Washington Wizards

Quick Links

Film study: Before praising Brandon Jennings too much for offense, defense is problematic

Film study: Before praising Brandon Jennings too much for offense, defense is problematic

Brandon Jennings led the bench with 10 points.

He made 4 of 5 shots, and had a key assist, helping the Wizards come back in Game 2 late in the fourth quarter of Wednesday's win over the Atlanta Hawks.

But pump the breaks with the praise.

He only helped undo a deficit that he had a major hand in creating in the first place because of his porous one-on-one defense that has been a recurring theme.

The obsession with points and offensive statistics in general -- see the NBA MVP race which has become hijacked by it -- ignores how the Wizards got behind.

Jennings made three consecutive shots, all jumpers, in a 2:07 span to start the fourthh quarter. The score went from an 80-76 deficit to 84-all following Jennings' assist to Jason Smith at the rim. John Wall and Bradley Beal closed the 109-101 victory for a 2-0 series lead.

Jennings' defense, however, has to change. He's not old and slow. He doesn't have any apparent physical limiations. There is no shame in getting beaten 1 vs. 1 in the NBA. It happens. But Jennings is getting beat on the first move before his help defense is in position to clean up the miess. The Hawks haven't shot the ball well but even the worst shooters can make layups:

Frontline foul trouble

Instead of moving his feet laterally to stay in front of Tim Hardaway, who has shot 7 of 28 in two games of the series, Jennings allows him by with red carpet treatment to the rim. This isn't on the rim protection. This is on the guard's lack of containment. To make matters worse, Jennings has to know who is on the court and the situation. Aside from Hardaway not being able to buy buckets from the outside, Markieff Morris gets put in a bind and ends up fouling Hardaway going downhill. It's his fifth foul. He'd started the fourth quarter after being on the bench most of the game and went right back to it.

Non-shooters get layups (and a rhythm)

Despite going under on the screen and Smith hedging to slow the ball, Jennings still gets beat to the rim by Schroder. He'd given him the cushion to take the shot and still gets blown by. Schroder had missed 2 of 3 shots to start the game -- all jumpers. Easy buckets can get a player like Schroder into a rhythm and then all of his other shots start falling. He started on a down note but Jennings' defense let him off the canvas. First and foremost, Schroder wasns to get to the rim. Not take jumpers.

Straight-line drives allowed

Before the defense even gets set, Kent Bazemore -- a lefty -- goes straight at Jennings and gets to the basket. Smith was correctly concerned with his man, Mike Dunleavy, running to spot at the arc (Smith was guarding Ersan Ilyaova but in transition defense you match up with the closest man). Smith's containment help could've been better as he made a reach, too, but he wasn't prepared for how quickly it developed. Bazemore's ballhandling can be suspect and he loves to go left. At least force him to change direction to his weaker side where he's more prone to mistakes and less likely to finish.

Turning corners allowed

Jennings has Schroder pinned on the sideline which should serve as an extra defender. There's only one thing he can do here to be successful. But Jennings is on his heels which allows the real estate to the rim rather than dictating to the ballhandler where he's permitted. Smith is out of position to help as he's tracking three-point shooting big Mike Muscala off a split . By the time he tries to slide down, it's too late. 

Solution

Beal defends Schroder late in the fourth quarter exactly the way you're supposed to each and every time. He shoots an airball. That simple. Beal has been consistent defensively all season because he doesn't go for the home-run plays. Give Schroder enough space to take away the drive, move your feet but keep your hands in your own pockets. 

Each time the Hawks were able to erase early deficits to get back into games with the Wizards in this series, they went at Jennings. Being targeted should motivate him to do better, but in later rounds of the playoffs vs. better teams these moments will ultimately cost the Wizards a close game or two and ultimately a series.

Talking about it or addressing it then will be too late. Of course, making shots like he did Wednesday can smooth some of that over but he can't be an open door on defense and the 27.4% shooter he was in 23 regular-season games in Washington.

MORE WIZARDS: Jennings helps Wizard's 4th quarter turnaround in Game 2

Quick Links

Cavs tried to trade Kyrie Irving to Warriors for Klay Thompson, report says

Cavs tried to trade Kyrie Irving to Warriors for Klay Thompson, report says

The Cavaliers ultimately got a lot in return for Kyrie Irving, a star point guard who wanted out after helping lead Cleveland to three straight NBA Finals appearances. But before they struck a deal with the Celtics for Isaiah Thomas and others, the Cavs reportedly tried for Klay Thompson of the Warriors.

Yes, the two teams that have met in the NBA Finals three straight times discussed a potential blockbuster. Marc Spears of ESPN's The Undefeated reported the would-be trade, saying Cavs GM Kobi Altman "did call the uninterested Warriors about Klay Thompson, a source said."

Well, wouldn't that have been interesting? From Cleveland's perspective, it would have been a great trade. Thompson could co-exist with LeBron James and Kevin Love, and one could argue he's a better player than Irving is. 

From the Warriors' side of things, that trade would have been a potential disaster. Irving would have needed to play alongside Stephen Curry and, though they would be amazing on offense, defense would be a completely different issue. Thompson works perfectly with Curry because he can not only score, but he's among the best defensive guards in the business. 

Beyond all those things, would the Warriors really want to switch it up now after winning their second title in three years? Nice try, Cleveland.

[RELATED: WHERE DO WIZARDS STAND IN EAST AFTER KYRIE TRADE?]

SCROLL DOWN FOR MORE WIZARDS STORIES

Quick Links

Wizards Tipoff podcast, Ep. 28 - What the Kyrie Irving-Isaiah Thomas trade means for the Wizards

wizardstipoff28.png
CSN

Wizards Tipoff podcast, Ep. 28 - What the Kyrie Irving-Isaiah Thomas trade means for the Wizards

On the latest episode of the Wizards Tipoff podcast, CSN New England's Celtics Insider A. Sherrod Blakeley joined the show to break down the blockbuster trade involving Kyrie Irving and Isaiah Thomas.

Chase Hughes and Chris Miller offered their own thoughts on the deal and later answered fan questions on the Wizards' bench.

You can listen to the episode right here:

You can download the podcast on Apple Podcasts right here and on Google Play. If you like the show please tell your friends!

[RELATED: Keef and Dolph: an odd couple friendship within the Wizards' organization]