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Tryon as Plan B

Tryon as Plan B

Rogers may fly the coop in 2010

After I posted about Justin Tryon yesterday, I thought a bit more about what Darrell Green said about him. In particular, this part jumped out at me: ". . . he's a starter in 2009, 2010 or whenever the opportunity comes."

What jumped out at me was the mention of 2010. Carlos Rogers will be a free agent next year, restricted or unrestricted depending on whether or not there is a new CBA. If he hits the free agent market he is likely to be a fairly highly sought after player assuming that he has a solid 2009.

That's fine; you want to have players that other teams want. But you don't want to be in a position where you're forced to break the bank because you have nobody on the team that can replace that player.

So, if Tryon lives up to Green's words, the Skins will be in a pretty good position when it comes to dealing with Rogers. If the bidding gets too high they can just let him go, knowing that a solid replacement, a player that they—gasp—drafted.

Now, I don't want everyone to think that I believe that Tryon is as good a Rogers or that I'm trying to run Rogers out of town. Neither of those is the case. I think that Rogers is highly underappreciated. He drops passes that other CB's wouldn't be in position to get their hands on.

But the world of sports is unlike that of other businesses in that the prices are set by your dumbest competitor. Often the Redskins are in the role of being that dumbest competitor. In this situation they might be able to draw a line in the stand and, if the bidding goes past that, let Rogers walk and have a cornerback who's working off of a fourth-round draftee rookie deal for the next two seasons. It's probably too much to hope to think it would be the start of a trend or anything like that, but any succession planning taking place at all is a welcome development.

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Updating Redskins' injury list after loss to Cardinals

Updating Redskins' injury list after loss to Cardinals

GLENDALE, AZ—The Redskins went into today’s game against the Cardinals somewhat banged up and they exit with a couple of additional injury concerns in the form of concussions.

Center Spencer Long left the game in the second quarter. Initially it was announced that he had been evaluated for a concussion but that he had been cleared. But after halftime the word came down that he had been retested and it was determined that he does have a concussion. Long has entered the concussion protocol.

Veteran John Sullivan, picked up earlier this season when Kory Lichtensteiger went on injured reserve, filled in a center the rest of the way. He is a capable fill-in but if Long is out he would be the only available center. The Redskins might have to sign a center if it looks like Long will be out of action against the Eagles.

In the fourth quarter safety Will Blackmon left the game. According to Redskins coach Jay Gruden he was being evaluated for a concussion and a stinger. His exact status is unknown. Gruden will give more information during a conference call with reporters on Monday.

[MORE: JOSH NORMAN ON HIS CRUCIAL FOURTH-QUARTER PENALTY]

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Josh Norman on his crucial fourth-quarter penalty vs. Larry Fitzgerald

Josh Norman on his crucial fourth-quarter penalty vs. Larry Fitzgerald

GLENDALE, AZ—The Redskins had a couple of chances to stop what would eventually turn into the Cardinals’ game-clinching drive in the fourth quarter. The first one came when they went for it on fourth and one at their own 34. It was a gutsy call by Arizona coach Bruce Arians and David Johnson make him look smart by popping off a 14-yard run.

The Cards earned that one. But it looked as though they got something of a gift a few plays later when Josh Norman was flagged holding receiver Larry Fitzgerald. It was a borderline call, granting Arizona a gift third and five conversion. Two plays later Carson Palmer went in for the kill, throwing a 42-yard touchdown pass to J.J. Nelson.

On the field, Norman seemed to be none too pleased with the penalty flag. He said after the game that he thinks that Fitzgerald may have stolen a flag.

“He [Fitzgerald] was within five yards. Larry is a wily vet,” said Norman. “I'd been doing it all game, kind of . . . He breaks out and I go for the ball and the flag got thrown. We'd like to see that not happen in that situation because there was some good position, some good leverage. And a flag came out.

“It is what it is. You can't blame a call on that, blame a call on this. It's whatever, man.”

Norman is right. The Redskins blew plenty of chances to take control of the game and the blame can be spread around on both sides of the ball. But the flag will loom large as the Redskins try to shake off this loss and get ready for the Eagles next week.

[MORE: ANGRY JAY GRUDEN SAYS REDSKINS 'NOT EVEN CLOSE' TO THINKING ABOUT PLAYOFFS]