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The O-line—A five-point plan

The O-line—A five-point plan

Milke Williams is unlikely to contribute so why keep him around?

The Washington Redskins' offensive line is getting to be like the weather—everyone wants to complain about it but nobody wants to do anything about it.

There are those who want the team to scan the available free agent list and sign a Jon Runyan or Levi Jones. I guess if you want to add even more age to a line that needs to get younger that might be a solution. I would call it a band-aid, one that may or may not stick. Joe Bugel and Jim Zorn need to just say no to age and implement the following plan:

  1. Cut Mike Williams—I've never heard of a player sitting out three years and returning to be an effective member of a team. Add in the 100-pound weight loss it took to get on the field and you have the impossible dream. The Redskins need to lose the illusion that this guy could help if needed and give the work to the players who can play.
  2. Bench Chris Samuels—Not for the regular season, for that meaningless string of glorified practices they call preseason games. Maybe get him out there to break a sweat but there is no sense in putting any more mileage on his body than is absolutely necessary. While he's riding the pine with his shoulder pads off identify his backup so that you don't have to put in your backup center if he goes out during a game. Devin Clark seems to be the first option right now, they need to see if he can get it done.
  3. Put Chad Reinhart in a right guard—That is what's happening now anyway with Randy Thomas nursing a knee injury. He also had neck surgery in the offseason. If Thomas can push Reinhart to the bench for the season opener, fine. But the chances of Thomas going 16 games are slim and Reinhart needs to be ready to go.
  4. Put Will Montgomery at center and leave him there—Not to supplant Casey Rabach but to see if he is capable of being the backup center. There are plenty of backup guards and we know that most centers could fill in a guard in a pinch anyway. He's 26 and although he may not be the long-term answer he could fill in until the Redskins draft a center (OK, I know the part about drafting a center is a bit farfetched).
  5. Treat Stephon Heyer and Jeremy Bridges as interchangeable parts—Neither one of them has demonstrated an ability to hold down a job so why pretend that one of them can? Figure on going with whichever one of them can keep Jason Campbell upright and stick with him until he breaks down. When (not if) that happens, put in the other guy. I know that this violates the cardinal rule that there are five starting offensive linemen and thou shalt not rotate or substitute unless one of them has a visible broken bone but this situation calls from some out of the box thinking.

Although I scoff at the idea of bringing in some veteran help, you might not. Vote in the poll and give your reasoning in the comments.

[polldaddy poll=1847496]

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The best players left in the draft for the Redskins—Offense

The best players left in the draft for the Redskins—Offense

The Redskins have seven picks in the final four rounds of the draft today. Here are some of the top players available on offense. Will look at the defense a little later this morning.

Offensive line

G Dorian Johnson, Pitt—The Redskins probably would want him to add a few pounds to his frame, as at 6-5 he currently carries “only” 300 pounds. He’s smart, tough, and athletic.

G Nico Siragusa, San Diego State—At 6-4, his weight is about right at 319 pounds. A three-year starter with a great power game and pass protection skills that will need to be coached up.

RELATED: Redskins focus on defense in first 3 rounds

Tight end/receiver

TE Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech—He’s big enough to be your blocking tight end and athletic enough to line up split out wide.

WR Dede Westbrook, Oklahoma—One of the most productive receivers in the country and a Heisman finalist. He’s a little small at 6-0, 178 but he has excellent deep speed.

Running back

RB Samaje Perine, Oklahoma—As a true freshman in 2014 he set the national record by rushing for 427 yards in a game against Kansas. He probably doesn’t have that kind of monster game in him at the next level but he will be a solid, reliable back who can handle a heavy workload.

RB Jeremy McNichols, Boise State—A very productive runner and pass catcher who posted over 2,200 yards of offense last year.

MORE REDSKINS: Three reasons to like the pick of Ryan Anderson 

Quarterback

QB Nathan Peterman, Pitt—Nobody would have batted an eye if he had gone off the board in the third or maybe even the late second round. If the Redskins are concerned about Kirk Cousins leaving as a free agent, Peterman carries a very similar set of skills.

QB Brad Kaaya, Miami—Another QB many thought may be off the board by now, Kaaya has the mental makeup to succeed at quarterback but his game needs a lot of polish.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Need to Know: The best Redskins late-round picks of the last 10 years

Need to Know: The best Redskins late-round picks of the last 10 years

Here is what you need to know on this Saturday, April 29, 25 days before the Redskins start OTAs on May 24.

Timeline

At Redskins Park—Fourth through seventh rounds of the NFL draft; conference calls with players selected; Gruden will speak to media shortly after Redskins’ final pick.

Days until:

—Redskins rookie camp (5/12) 13
—Redskins OTAs start (5/24) 25
—Training camp starts (7/27) 89
—Redskins opener vs. Eagles (9/10) 134

The Redskins’ best late-round picks since of the last 10 years

While no aspect of drafting in the NFL is easy, it is much harder to find key contributors on the last day of the draft than it is in the first three rounds. The Redskins will have seven picks in this afternoon's draft to try to find one or two of them. 

Since the 2007 draft the Redskins have taken 56 players from the fourth round on. Of those, 45 played in at least one NFL game but only 12 of them were the Redskins’ primary starter at their positions for at least one season. Here are the five best of those players.

QB Kirk Cousins (round 4, 2012)—He was probably the most controversial pick on this list since the Redskins had just drafted Robert Griffin III a couple of days earlier. History proved Mike Shanahan right.

RB Alfred Morris (6, 2012)—This pick came a few hours after and with much less noise than the Cousins pick did. Many believed that the Redskins were set a running back with Roy Helu and Evan Royster. Morris not only surprised many by making the team but he lined up as the Week 1 starter. He went on to break the team’s single-season rushing record by piling up 1,613 yards rushing.

LB Perry Riley (4, 2010)—He didn’t get into the lineup until midway through his second season. Riley was always solid for four-plus seasons as the starter but never spectacular. The team let him go last year in training camp and he played well for the Raiders after they picked him up.

CB Bashaud Breeland (4, 2014)—Breeland started 15 games as a rookie. At first he was in the slot but after DeAngelo Hall was injured in Week 3, Breeland moved to the outside and he has stayed there ever since. He has seven career interceptions and seven forced fumbles.

WR Jamison Crowder (4, 2015)—At 5-9, many teams thought Crowder was undersized and he didn’t run a great 40 at the combine. But he was big enough and fast enough to break the Redskins rookie record for receptions in a season and then to lead the team in touchdowns with eight last year.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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