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The biggest Redskins deals that never happened

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The biggest Redskins deals that never happened

For every trade and other deal that NFL teams make, there are a dozen or so that are rumored or that fall apart for a variety of reasons. Here, in reverse chronological order, are some of the biggest Washington Redskins deals that never took place.

  • Jay Cutler from Denver to Washington, 2009—This is the most recent, of course. A direct trade with the Broncos didn't get traction because Broncos coach Josh McDaniels didn't want Jason Campbell and a three-way trade involving Cleveland fell apart at the last minute.

  • Lance Briggs from Chicago to Washington, 2007—This was a Dan Snyder creation. The trade came up over cocktails with Briggs' agent Drew Rosenhaus at the owners' meetings. Pro Bowl linebacker Briggs, the Bears' franchise player, would have gone to Washington and the Redskins and the teams would have swapped first-round picks (the Redskins had No. 6, the Bears No. 31). The Bears didn't seem to want any part of it and Joe Gibbs didn't seem to be very enthusiastic about it either. Rosenhaus managed to keep the talk going for a while it never happened.

  • Reggie White as a free agent to Washington, 1993—White was the biggest catch of the first truly free free agency class in 1993. It appeared certain that the Redskins would be able to outbid everyone for the defensive end's services. The Packers weren't considered to be a factor at all until the moment he signed a four year, $17 million deal with Green Bay.
  • John Elway from Denver to Washington, 1991—The two teams involved managed to keep a tight lid on this one and we heard nothing about it at the time. Mark Rypien, the Redskins starter in 1990, was balking at signing a new contract, so Joe Gibbs got on the phone to the Broncos to talk about dealing for Elway, who at the time was a star without a championship ring. The talks never got beyond preliminary discussions. Rypien eventually signed and went on to become the Super Bowl MVP.
  • Darrell Green from Washington to Denver, 1989—This one got way beyond the talking stage and almost became a reality. Here's the story from the pages of my upcoming book The Redskins Chronicle:

    April 4—For how much longer will Darrell Green be a Washington Redskin?

    Trade talks with the Denver Broncos have gone from discussion to real negotiation in the past days. The Redskins would take Denver's first-round pick (13th overall) and a player for the rights to Green. Just who that player would be is the sticking point.

    The Redskins are willing to part with their 1983 first-round pick for a couple of reasons. One is the nagging injuries that have slowed the 5-9, 185-lb. cornerback to the extent that the team is concerned that he may be on the downside of his career.

    The other reason is money. Green made $450,000 last year and is looking for a raise to $1 million a year. The Redskins are willing to give him a raise, but not to seven figures. The Broncos apparently are willing to pay Green his asking price.

    The team has braced for Green's possible departure by signing cornerback Martin Mayhew as a free agent.

The Redskins eventually decided to hold on to Green and he signed a new contract in July.

  • Sonny Jurgensen from Philadelphia to Washington, 1960—Yes, this deal did occur—in 1964. In 1960, Jurgensen was a backup to Norm Van Brocklin and the Redskins had their eye on him. But the Eagles didn't want to give up their promising clipboard carrier. Four years later, after Jurgensen became the starter and tormented the Redskins on several occasions, the Skins finally got their man.

All of these trade rumors and the stories of the deals that did happen are detailed in my upcoming book The Redskins Chronicle. If you want to know when it comes out, just go to the book's website and sign up.

Did I miss any? Do you remember any that you want me to investigate? Discuss in the comments.

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Redskins Stat Breakdown: What worked - and what didn't - against Arizona

Redskins Stat Breakdown: What worked - and what didn't - against Arizona

CSN has teamed up with The Edge Systems to provide the occasional statistical review of Redskins game film. The Edge is analytical football software currently being used by coaches in the NFL, SEC, ACC and the media, providing some of the fastest and best data in football.

Below is a breakdown of the Redskins run game against Arizona - a game coach Jay Gruden admitted did not feature enough carries for Robert Kelley. 

The Redskins had a lot of success with their GAP runs early in the game.

In the first half they were successful on 75 percent of their GAP runs. 

As the game wore on the Redskins moved away from what had been successful and only ran two GAP runs in the second half.

As their power running game vanishing, mirrored their prospects for winning the game.

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

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State of the Redskins: Playoff chances trending in the wrong direction

State of the Redskins: Playoff chances trending in the wrong direction

Here is where the Redskins stand in Week 14 of the NFL season.

Record: 6-5-1, 3rd in NFC East
vs. NFC East: 2-2
vs. NFC: 4-4
vs. AFC: 2-1-1
Home: 4-2
Away: 2-3-1

Rankings and changes from Week 13

Offense (yards/game): 418.6 (2nd, no change from Week 13)
Defense (yards/game): 369.6 (23rd, +2)
Points for: 303 (10th, -1)
Points against: 295 (20th, -2)

Passer rating offense:  99.8 (8th, -2)
Opp passer rating: 95.0 (22nd, -3)
Yards/rush attempt: 4.5 (5th, no change)
Opp. yards/rush attempt:
 4.6 (29th, +2)
Weighted DVOA (Football Outsiders): 9.8% (10th, no change)
Playoff chances per FO: 41.5%, -14.1% from last week

Trending the right way: Not much, really. Their ranking in rushing defense improved a couple of notches but mostly because other teams got worse, not because the Redskins put the clamps down on the rushing game.

Trending the wrong way: For the first time in a few weeks the Redskins’ playoff chances are below 50 percent. Two straight losses will do that.  

Top three storylines:

Letting them have it—Jay Gruden is usually supportive of his team after a loss but that was not the case following the Cardinals game. He could be heard speaking to the team in angry tones in the locker room following the loss. We will see if this rare tirade jump-starts the Redskins’ stretch run.

Dealing with injury issues—Not only do the Redskins have to be concerned about the condition of Jordan Reed, whose status is unclear as he rehabs from a shoulder injury he suffered on Thanksgiving Day in Dallas, their starting center is in the concussion protocol. If Spencer Long can’t go the Redskins may have to add a center to back up John Sullivan.

Help wanted—The Redskins need other teams to lose if they want to make the playoffs. They need a little help if they win out to finish 10-5-1; they need more help if they finish at 9-6-1. Scoreboard watching starts at 4:25 on Sunday when the Bucs, a half-game ahead of Washington, host the Saints and continues on Sunday night football with the Cowboys at the Giants.

Next three games

Sunday @ Eagles (5-7)—The Redskins handled them well in October; the final score did not indicate how Washington dominated the game. The Eagles look more like a rebuilding team than a playoff contender and the Redskins could elimate them for all practical purposes

December 19 vs. Panthers (4-8)—The season of the defending NFC champs officially came off the rails on Sunday night when Cam Newton started the game on the bench because he didn’t wear a tie and he ended it looking at the wrong end of a 40-7 beatdown by the Seahawks. Still, the Redskins have never beaten Newton so this is not one that will come easily.

Christmas Eve vs. Bears (3-9)—There is no such thing as an easy game in the NFL but if the Redskins can’t manage to win this one they don’t deserve to make the playoffs.