Quick Links

Stupid

Stupid

Dos uno's wasn't enough to get Ocho Cinco to Washington.

I would have posted this sooner, but I was out looking for thank-you cards for Mike Brown and Marvin Lewis. However, the local Hallmark store had nothing in their "thanks for saving an organization from self-destructing" line.

Dan Snyder and Vinny Cerrato have been drawing praise since the departure of Joe Gibbs because, for the most part, they have done nothing.

After seeing what they offered the Cincinnati Bengals in an effort to obtain Chad Johnson there is fervent hope on the part of many that they will crawl back into their hole.

If you read this space with any regularity, you know that I tend to give the Redskins' organization the benefit of the doubt. However, none of that is forthcoming here.

Snyder and Cerrato's decision (and I have to join them at the hip in looking at this as it has the fingerprints of both of them all over it) to offer the Bengals their first-round pick this year and a conditional pick that would be at least a third and perhaps a first in exchange for disgruntled wide receiver Chad Johnson was stupid.

Incredibly stupid.

Crazy stupid.

Stupid and stupider.

I don't have a problem with Johnson, the persona. While I'm decidedly the old-school type, the celebrations, the list of cornerback "victims" and the brash talk that make up the Ocho Cinco character are no big deal. I've been a reporter in a locker room looking for a good quote and it would have been refreshing and fun to have such entertainment at hand.

And Johnson does produce on the field. He cranks out 90-catch, 1,400 yard seasons with regularity. Certainly, the Redskins' offense would have been better had the Bengals taken the bait.

It would have been better in 2008, anyway. And probably in 2009. Beyond that the returns from the deal would start to diminish. And that is the rub.

Johnson celebrated his 30th birthday last January. The production of most football players who are not quarterbacks generally starts to drop off at that age. CJ does keep himself in excellent shape so he may be able to cheat Father Time out of a season or two. But anything beyond that would be a lot to ask for.

It would be a questionable deal if the team was one playmaking wide receiver away from a Super Bowl run. But they're not.

They are a couple of good drafts away from being a perennial contender. The odds of executing a good draft are much better when you, you know, have all of your picks.

Now, there is no guarantee that the Redskins' will be able to land a wide receiver of the quality of Johnson with the #21 pick. In fact, it's unlikely that they will. But they are likely to be able to get one who will be productive for the next half dozen years at a fraction of the salary cap cost of CJ.

Even if Snyder and Cerrato decided that they had to have Johnson, why not wait it out to see if the price drops? It certainly isn't going to get any higher. A Chad Johnson sitting out and making noise in late August might be able to be acquired for a relative song.

Evidently, Snyder took Lewis' pronouncement last February that Johnson would not be traded as the Bengals' coach saying that it would take a hell of an offer to get him out of Cincy. As it turns out, what Lewis said was not a negotiating ploy; it was a statement of fact.

It's also a statement of fact to say that the Redskins' personnel decision-making is in highly questionable hands.

Quick Links

Robert Kelley, Su'a Cravens, Colt McCoy among Redskins who'll have new numbers in 2017

Robert Kelley, Su'a Cravens, Colt McCoy among Redskins who'll have new numbers in 2017

The next time Robert Kelley plows over a helpless linebacker, he'll do it with a new number on his uniform.

The second-year running back is switching from No. 32 to No. 20, according to Redskins.com. And he's not the only returning player who'll take the field in 2017 with a new pair of digits.

Su'a Cravens will no longer be No. 36 for Washington. Instead, he'll change to No. 30. DJ Swearinger will be taking over No. 36 after coming over from the Cardinals, a number that he reportedly purchased from Cravens for $75,000

Then there's Colt McCoy. McCoy has donned No. 16 for the past three seasons, but he's throwing it back to his college days and will now rock No. 12.

MORE REDSKINS: THE ULTIMATE REDSKINS DRAFT PREVIEW

Finally, second-year corner Kendall Fuller only spent one year with No. 38. As he hopes to improve in his sophomore campaign, he'll be doing so with No. 29.

As for the free agents, Terrelle Pryor will be replacing DeSean Jackson in more ways than one when kickoff rolls around. Not only will the ex-Brown have to shine as a top receiver for Kirk Cousins like Jackson did, but he'll also be sporting Jackson's No. 11.

New linebacker Zach Brown, meanwhile, is now No. 56, linemen Stacy McGee and Terrell McClain are Nos. 92 and 97 respectively and Brian Quick will keep No. 83 from his Rams days.

For a complete list of all the changes, click here.

RELATED: IS REUBEN FOSTER WORTH THE RISK?

Quick Links

How big a need do the Redskins have at running back?

christian_mccaffrey_running_usat.png
USA TODAY Sports Images

How big a need do the Redskins have at running back?

Do the Redskins have a draft need at running back? It depends on who you ask.

Jay Gruden seems to be very happy with incumbent running back Rob Kelley. Here is what he had to say last month about the second-year back, signed as an undrafted free agent out of Tulane, last month:

“Oh, man, I love Rob Kelley,” Gruden said. “I thought he played great. You throw a rookie free agent into the fire like that and see him play and compete. Not one time did I feel like it was too big for him. Not once. That’s a hell of a thing to say for a kid out of Tulane who only had a couple of carries his senior year. He came right in, he competes on every play.”

[Related: Full Redskins Seven-Round Mock Draft]

Kelley played in 15 games last year and rushed for 704 yards and scored six touchdowns. He started the last nine games and if you project his numbers in this games out over a 16-game season you get about 1,050 yards and 11 touchdowns. That’s not Ezekiel Elliott or Le’Veon Bell production but it’s good for a team that is going to rely mostly on the pass.

Gruden also praised third-down back Chris Thompson and backup Mack Brown. In a telling sign, he acknowledged that 2015 third-round pick Matt Jones is still on the roster but he didn’t have much good to say about him.

Why, then, do you see so many draft analysts listing running back as one of the team’s most urgent needs? Mark Maske, who is the Post’s national NFL writer but also a former Redskins beat reporter, has them taking Stanford RB Christian McCaffrey in his mock draft. “There certainly are issues on defense for the Redskins,” writes Maske. But there also is a need at running back.”

Lance Zierlein of NFL.com said that the Redskins “obviously” need a running back as his rationale for mocking Florida State’s Dalvin Cook to Washington at No. 17.

So, what is it? Is Kelley adequate for the Redskins’ needs considering they call pass plays on over 60 percent of their offensive snaps? Would they run more often if they had a back like McCaffrey or Cook? And if they did run more would the offense improve?

I think that running back is like several positions with the Redskins. If they have to get through the 2016 season with what they have they will be OK. But if there is an upgrade on the board when they are on the clock they won’t hesitate to make the pick if he’s the best player available.

We will see what happens if, say, McCaffrey is still on the board when the Redskins pick at No. 17 and top defensive targets like Rueben Foster and Haason Reddick are off the board. That will be the true test to see how committed Gruden and the rest of the organization are to Kelley, Thompson, and company. 

More Redskins: When the talent is there, Bruce Allen has looked past red flags before