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Stand behind (and in front of) your Redskins

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Stand behind (and in front of) your Redskins

We know that many fans want to stand up and cheer for their Washington Redskins. But how many are willing to stand up for the whole game and pay for the privilege of doing so?The team has sent an email to fans offering standing room seats in the upper deck of FedEx Field for 290 for the eight regular season games and two preseason games.The standing room area was created when about 10,000 upper deck seats were removed in order to build what the team called party decks. It appears that the name has been dropped but the areas will be ready for the coming season.On their general seating tickets, the Redskins do not list the 10 percent county tax that is paid at purchase. That could well be the case here so expect to pay the additional money if you are interested in the standing room tickets.As of now, the standing room tickets are available for full-season purchase only. Single game sales could happen at some future point if all of the tickets available, estimated by the Washington Post to be 4,000 to 5,000, are not sold as season packages.Since the area is designated as standing room, the tickets do not need to be sold out in order to lift the NFLs blackout restrictions.The lowest priced general admission tickets have a face value of 44, although those prices are grandfathered in for fans who were displaced when the upper-level end zone seats were removed. The cheapest ticket available to new ticket holders is 64.

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To Kevin Durant, it's simple: Kirk Cousins deserves a rich contract

To Kevin Durant, it's simple: Kirk Cousins deserves a rich contract

If Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Kevin Durant were in charge of the Redskins, Kirk Cousins' future in Washington would not be in doubt like it currently is. 

A handful of days after NASCAR's most popular driver said he's "tired of waiting" for the Burgundy and Gold to decide on the quarterback's next contract, one of the NBA's top players echoed his fellow fan's opinion.

"I love Cousins," Durant told the Washington Post. "I think he deserves a long-term deal. I think so. I think he’s the future for us."

To Durant, the stability that comes from a multiyear-deal would go a long way in providing the 28-year-old passer more comfort and confidence under center for the 'Skins.

"I think he’ll play better knowing that, ‘I’m here, this is my team. I’m rooted in this city,'" Durant said. "I think that all factors in to making a good player, so hopefully we sign him to a long-term deal."

Last summer, as Durant was looking for his next home in the Association, people in the DMV strongly supported the #KD2DC movement. That one obviously didn't work out, but if the Warriors star is able to pitch in on the #KC2DC movement, perhaps he'll win back at least some love from his hometown fans.

MORE REDSKINS: THESE KIRK COUSINS NEGOTIATIONS ARE UNCHARTERED WATERS

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Redskins entering uncharted waters in Cousins contract situations

Redskins entering uncharted waters in Cousins contract situations

Last year, the Redskins gave Kirk Cousins the franchise tag on the last possible day. It looks like that is what will happen this year, with the deadline coming at 4 p.m. on Wednesday.

However, Cousins getting tagged and then signing the offer shortly after that was the end of the process. This year it looks like it could be the beginning of it. And when it starts, the Redskins will be going into territory where no NFL team has gone before.

It appears that the Redskins and Cousins will have difficulty coming to terms on a new contract. The gap between the team’s valuation of Cousins’ worth in a long-term contract and what Cousins believes he can get on the open market appears to be vast, perhaps several million dollars a year or more. And since Cousins likely will be on the open market in 2018 if he plays out this year on the tag there is no incentive for Cousins to compromise.

RELATED: NFL Mock Draft Version 4.0

This leaves the Redskins in a box. They can either pay Cousins a significant amount more than they think he is worth, a move that would hamper their ability to pay other players what they are worth. Or they can let another team pay him and move on at the quarterback position.

When faced with such choices in the past, NFL teams have just paid the quarterback whatever it took to get the deal done. The Redskins don’t appear to be inclined to do that.

Since it doesn’t look like they are willing to bite the bullet and pay Cousins they must figure out the end game. Their options are limited. Just letting him go into free agency does not appear to be a realistic way to go. They can franchise tag him, pay him $23.94 million in installments of $1.41 million due each of the 17 weeks of the regular season, and then figure out how to handle 2018 when it comes around. Next year they could let him walk, franchise tag him a third for whopping $34.5 million (unlikely) or give him the transition tag. That tag would be less expensive at $28.7 million and it would give the Redskins the right to match any offer sheet.

None of those 2018 options seems to be particularly attractive. The franchise tag is prohibitively expensive, the transition tag is only slightly less so but it gives the Redskins only the chance to match an offer made to Cousins without the option of taking draft pick compensation. And with either tag, Cousins could simply sign the tag, play out the year on it and become a free agent in 2019 with all tag options off the table.

Their other option is the tag and trade this year. This would entail Cousins getting tagged and then working out a trade that may bring less than the two first-round draft picks as compensation. In fact, it could bring a lot less.

No matter how they proceed, the Redskins will be in uncharted waters. No quarterback has played a second season on the franchise tag. And no quarterback who has thrown for over 4,000 yards in back-to-back seasons has played the next season for another team. So, either way the Redskins are doing something that never has been done before.

MORE REDSKINS: #RedskinsTalk podcast: Is Kirk too nice for his own good?

If the Redskins move on from Cousins, whether it’s this year or next, they will be saying no to the NFL conventional wisdom that says you pay whatever it takes to hold on to your quarterback. When, say, the Patriots do something unconventional or when the Seahawks don’t follow the NFL orthodoxy the assumption is that they know what they are doing and that everything will turn out fine.

However, the Redskins do not enjoy a sterling reputation for being smart operators. Their last major quarterback decision, trading three first-round picks and a second for Robert Griffin III, quickly turned into a disaster. They will get no benefit of the doubt no matter how they proceed here.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.