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Skins Big Media Bias: Caught Red Handed

Skins Big Media Bias: Caught Red Handed

I'm not one to whine much about media bias against the Redskins. Yes, there is a lot of negative reporting about the Redskins. It's hard to find a Skins draft grade out there above what I got in high school physics (and there's a reason I'm not a rocket scientist). My line of reasoning has been based on the fact that until they make the playoffs again or at least post a couple of consecutive winning seasons, the critics will be out there.

Sometimes, however, the critics get caught in a biased moment. When something they said in a context that doesn't involve the Redskins suddenly does pertains to Danny Snyder's team, the positive spin becomes inoperative and turns negative, or vice versa depending on the situation.

Read the following statement and tell me who made it:
Campbell looked really good -- so good that you find yourself wondering: How can a scout watch this kid and not label his arm, athleticism and field presence all first-round gifts?Was it Joe Gibbs or Vinny Cerrato? Auburn coach Tommy Tubberville? Some homer Redskins blogger out there?

No, it was said in this article by Peter King. Yes, the very same Peter King who annually draws the ire of Redskins fans when he leads to charge to block Art Monk's entry into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The very same Sports Illustrated writer who hasn't had anything good to say about the Redskins since the Norv Turner era.

To say that he is ga-ga over Campbell in the article, which was published two weeks before the draft on April 11, would be an understatement. You have to click over to the third page before you find the nut of the story:
Next I watched Campbell. My first question was: Where's this guy been hiding? The simple answer: Behind Brown and a very big Cadillac. Campbell is 6-4 3/4 and 230 pounds. His pass-drop is quick and textbook perfect. He sets up well in the pocket, bouncing athletically until he finds his receivers. He never flinches against a pass rush, moving deftly this way or that to avoid traffic. He throws on the run better than Rodgers or Campbell. On one throw against Kentucky last fall, he rolled out from his 46 to his right, then flicked a sideline throw 19 yards downfield for an in-stride completion. That's the kind of throw he'll be asked to make 100 times a year in the NFL.
He concludes in regards to what quarterback the 49ers should draft among Alex Smith, Aaron Rogers and Campbell:
I hope they take another look at Campbell. I sure would if I were Mike Nolan.
But, hey, if you're Joe Gibbs, you're a fool to make the trade for the 25th pick in the draft in order to take a quarterback who is in the writer's view an equal to the #1 overall pick, according to King.

On Monday on PTI, King literally laughed at the Redskins for drafting Campbell, saying that it was obvious that the right hand didn't know what the left hand was doing. He made absolutely no mention of the fact that he thought that Campbell was Smith's equal. If he did, then that would have blown the whole media template established that the Redskins are the gang that can't shoot straight.

If you're trading a couple of mid-rounders for a shot to get an guy who's as good as the best quarterback in the draft, that's a pretty shrewd deal. That's something that, to the Peter Kings of the world, the Redskins can't make. So, just like in the Nixon White House, previous statements become inoperative. Campbell's talents are first-round gifts when another team might be looking at him. When the Redskins take him in the first, they're bumblers.

We're always suspected it, but now we have the goods on at least one of them.

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Need to Know: Redskins’ needs line up well with the strength of the draft

Need to Know: Redskins’ needs line up well with the strength of the draft

Here is what you need to know on this Wednesday, April 25, one day before the April 27 NFL draft.

Timeline

Days until:

—Redskins rookie camp (5/12) 16
—Redskins OTAs start (5/24) 28
—Training camp starts (7/27) 92
—Redskins opener vs. Eagles (9/10) 137

Wrapping up the Redskins pre-draft presser

We’ve looked at a some of what Redskins college scouting director Scott Campbell said during his pre-draft press conference on Monday, covering possible trades, who makes the final call on those trades, and how the organization handles character issues. Here are a few more bullet points from Campbell’s presser:

—Asked if the Redskins would draft to fill needs or take the best available player, Campbell gave the stock answer. “I guess as you asked the question, you kind of framed it and the way I’m going to frame the answer, and the age-old answer of ‘I’m going to take the best player available,’” he said “And if that serves your needs, that’s a bonus.” So, there you go. That said, don’t be surprised if the best players as defined by the Redskins in the first few also happen have the “bonus” of filling one the team’s top two or three needs.

—The needs could line up well because the strength of the draft as Campbell sees it coincides with side of the ball where the Redskins need the most help. “Well, I’m excited because I think it’s one of the strongest, deepest classes on the defensive side of the ball that I’ve seen,” he said. “I’ve told the guys upstairs I’m excited because we’re going to get better . . . And several different positions – sometimes it’s just maybe defensive line or outside backers or corners. Across the board on defense, I’m really excited about the class and the guys we’re going to bring in are going to help us.”

—The draft board is still used after the draft ends and the scramble for undrafted free agents starts up. “There’s going to be guys left on the bottom of that board that didn’t get drafted that we had rated as draftable,” said Campbell. “So that’s our No. 1 targets. I assign a scout to all the coaches, and really the coaches talk to the players – once the draft ends, let me be clear, it’s after the draft ends when we start making calls – the scouts are on the phone with the agent finding out what our competition is, how much.” Campbell said that money isn’t much of a factor in recruiting the undrafted players; selling opportunity is the key.

—The draft board was influenced by former GM Scot McCloughan but adjustments have been made since he was fired in early March. “Well, he certainly had influence on it because we all met as we always did the last couple of years and every team does. You meet right after the all-star games before you go to the combine and kind of get an initial ranking of how you like the guys. Of course Scot hadn’t been here since, so just like when he was here before, there’s adjustments being made to the board with the new information.”

—The 2016 draft class did not contribute a lot but does not mean that there is more pressure on the organization to do better this year. The pressure is always there regardless. “Always pressure. Every year’s pressure,” said Campbell. “I grew up in an NFL household. My dad was a coach and a player for 40 years. Pressure every year to perform, that’s what the NFL is. You’ve got to perform every year.” His father was Marion Campbell who played in the NFL for eight years and then coached for 21 seasons including stints as the head coach of the Eagles and Falcons.

—Campbell also asked for a little patience with the 2016 draft class, citing a group from a few years ago. “It takes a couple of years to develop a class,” said Campbell. “People are saying the ‘14 class had some success. Well, if I read articles and see what happened and what was said right after that draft, our grades in the mock drafts were not very good. It takes time. Morgan Moses didn’t start his first year, you know, but he’s come on to be one of the best right tackles in the league. That’s my opinion anyway. It takes time to develop. I still think with time, that class [2016] will be just fine.” I guess I buried the lede here—Campbell reads draft grades.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Redskins 2017 NFL Draft preview: What you need to know about the Redskins' draft

Redskins 2017 NFL Draft preview: What you need to know about the Redskins' draft

The 2017 NFL Draft isn't officially here, but it's very near. And for the Washington Redskins, this year's NFL Draft brings with it a lot of intrigue.

The Redskins are coming off an 8-7-1 season and are in the middle of an offseason that's included a lot of change. Therefore, the team needs to ace their 2017 NFL Draft and bring in a rookie class with a lot of talent. 

How will they do that, though? Starting with pick No. 17, will the Redskins draft a player based on need or based on their board? And which prospects would be the best fits for Washington?

Scroll through CSNmidatlantic.com's 2017 Redskins draft preview for the most in-depth coverage of the team's draft you'll find before the big night.

What will the Redskins' draft strategy be for the 2017 Draft?

 

 

 

What are the Redskins' biggest draft needs? 

 

 

 

  • Feeling a safety? Malik Hooker and Budda Baker both figure to be in the mix when the Redskins first pick on Thursday night.

 

What are mock drafts projecting the Redskins to do at No. 17?

 

 

 

 

Other Redskins draft storylines that Redskins fans should know

 

 

Draft busts: 15 draft busts taken in Round 1

NFL Draft history: The best players taken 17th overall