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Silva's June Top 150

Adrian Peterson

Silva's June Top 150

While we don't expect to have a firm grip on position-battle outcomes until midway through or even the end of training camp, many depth chart situations have at least begun to clarify during OTAs. Somesignificant injuries have already occurred. Mandatory, full-squad minicamp season will begin next week. Training camp opens in late July.

These are my Top 150 fantasy rankings as of June 7, weighted based on positional depth (i.e. quarterback is deep) and concocted with standard-league scoring in mind. There are PPR references throughout the player writeups, but the rankings were made according to a yardage- and touchdown-heavy scoring system.

Editor's Note: For all the latest NFL and fantasy information, keep it locked on Rotoworld's Player News Page. And follow @EvanSilva and @Rotoworld_FB on Twitter.

First Round

1. Adrian Peterson -- Most dominant player at fantasy's most valued position.
2. Doug Martin -- Fantasy's No. 2 scorer as rookie gets both stud guards back.
3. C.J. Spiller -- Huge year imminent for centerpiece of new Bills run-first offense.
4. Marshawn Lynch -- Lone real concern is possible suspension after 2012 DUI.
5. Jamaal Charles -- Top-3 PPR pick under pass-happy new coach Andy Reid.
6. Alfred Morris -- Ideal standard-league back churns out yards and touchdowns.
7. Calvin Johnson -- Megatron has a tier unto himself among fantasy receivers.
8. Arian Foster -- Many red flags. Overworked. Rapid YPC decline. Already hurt.
9. Trent Richardson -- Overblown injury concerns will make him great draft value.
10. LeSean McCoy -- Set for career-high workload in run-heavy Chip Kelly attack.
11. Jimmy Graham -- Clear top tight end due to Rob Gronkowski's medical woes.
12. Ray Rice -- Bernard Pierce usage is concern, but still a shoo-in top-15 pick.

Second Round

13. Steven Jackson -- A virtual lock for double-digit TDs in high-octane offense.
14. Stevan Ridley -- Better in standard than PPR; Ridley doesn't catch passes.
15. Brandon Marshall -- Ideal fit for Bears new quick-hitting, pass-heavy scheme.
16. Dez Bryant -- Monster talent has arrived and learned to defeat double teams.
17. A.J. Green -- Only mediocre QB play keeps Green behind Marshall and Dez.
18. Julio Jones -- WR1 but shares the ball with Roddy White and Tony Gonzalez.
19. Rob Gronkowski -- High-risk, high-reward pick after surgery-filled offseason.
20. Demaryius Thomas -- WR1 but shares ball with Eric Decker and Wes Welker.
21. Andre Johnson -- The DeAndre Hopkins pick could cost him a fistful of targets.
22. Frank Gore -- Still going strong at 30 and has best run-blocking OL in league.
23. Matt Forte -- Will be better PPR pick; Forte could catch 90 passes this year.
24. Chris Johnson -- Production depends on long runs. Boom/bust weekly player.

Third Round

25. Larry Fitzgerald -- Carson Palmer and Bruce Arians will rejuvenate his stats.
26. Vincent Jackson -- Last year's No. 6 fantasy wideout can improve TD total (8).
27. Dwayne Bowe -- Alex Smith is the best quarterback of Bowe's NFL career.
28. Percy Harvin -- New focal point of Seahawks up-and-coming passing offense.
29. Darren McFadden -- Hate Oakland's offense but DMC slated for big workload.
30. Drew Brees -- Top-two fantasy quarterback in four of the past five seasons.
31. Aaron Rodgers -- Run-game improvement could curb Rodgers' upside slightly.
32. Cam Newton -- No. 5 fantasy QB as a rookie and finished as QB4 last year.
33. Tom Brady -- A top-three quarterback scorer in three consecutive seasons.
34. Aaron Hernandez -- Could catch 90-100 passes if Gronkowski misses time.
35. David Wilson -- G-Men need to lean on run this year to hide shaky defense.
36. Roddy White -- No longer a sexy pick, but consistent WR2 with high floor.

Fourth Round

37. Randall Cobb -- Rodgers' favorite target is a candidate for 100-plus receptions.
38. Marques Colston -- Reliable WR2 pick typically scores like a borderline WR1.
39. Victor Cruz -- NFL's premier speed-slot receiver; holdout not a concern just yet.
40. Reggie Bush -- Will probably finish second on Lions in catches, behind Mega.
41. DeMarco Murray -- Overrated talent, but workhorse until he gets injured again.
42. Matthew Stafford -- Fantasy's likeliest bounce-back star after hard-luck season.
43. Montee Ball -- Seems to have already earned Peyton Manning's trust at OTAs.
44. Chris Ivory -- Will be foundation of Jets offense as "Ground 'N Pound" returns.
45. Maurice Jones-Drew -- Workload is a plus, but fading runner coming off injury.
46. Lamar Miller -- Explosive downhill runner with prime opportunity for breakout.
47. Eddie Lacy -- If Lacy wins starting job outright, he'll be a shoo-in for 10+ TDs.
48. Le'Veon Bell -- Lacks big-play run skills, but should lead rookies in touches.


Fifth Round

49. Reggie Wayne -- Volume WR in more balanced O.
50. Antonio Brown -- Legitimate threat for 100 catches.
51. Jordy Nelson -- Fantasy's No. 2 WR as recently as '11.
52. Darren Sproles -- His baseline is WR2/3-caliber stats.
53. Tony Gonzalez -- Top-five fantasy tight end in six of his last seven seasons.
54. Steve Smith -- Shows few signs of slowing down despite advancing age (34).
55. Russell Wilson -- No. 1 overall fantasy QB over last season's final five weeks.
56. Danny Amendola -- Will produce like WR1/2 for as many games as he lasts.
57. Andrew Luck -- Expect Luck's efficiency to spike in Pep Hamilton's offense.
58. Peyton Manning -- Signs of decline at age 37, but remains mid-range QB1.
59. Matt Ryan -- Might be overdrafted this season; still never a top-6 fantasy QB.
60. Robert Griffin III -- Could pass Luck, Manning, Ryan if recovery stays on track.

Sixth Round

61. Mike Wallace -- Flirted with WR1 value in Pittsburgh; will be WR2/3 in Miami.
62. Pierre Garcon -- Would be top-15 receiver candidate if not for troublesome toe.
63. Torrey Smith -- Ravens counting on year-three leap with Anquan Boldin gone.
64. Eric Decker -- TDs will regress, but Decker still makes for a passable WR2.
65. Vernon Davis -- Projects as primary beneficiary of Michael Crabtree's injury.
66. Jason Witten -- Should remain high-catch total guy, but never a big TD scorer.
67. Wes Welker -- Will disappoint owners counting on his old Patriots statistics.
68. Ahmad Bradshaw -- Assumes he signs with Colts. Would be their lead back.
69. Ryan Mathews -- Might be better rebound candidate if he had a better O-Line.
70. Greg Jennings -- Takes over the Percy Harvin role in Christian Ponder's offense.
71. Hakeem Nicks -- Value depends wholly on his health, which hasn't been good.

72. DeSean Jackson -- Clearly passing Jeremy Maclin as Eagles' top fantasy WR.

Seventh Round

73. Colin Kaepernick -- Michael Crabtree Achilles' tear drops Kap to borderline QB1.
74. Jonathan Stewart -- New Panthers offense will lean more on the running backs.
75. Giovani Bernard -- Bernard's role should increase as the season progresses.
76. James Jones -- Won't lead NFL in receiving TDs again, but role is increasing.
77. T.Y. Hilton -- Will move up this list once he beats out Darrius Heyward-Bey.
78. Kenny Britt -- Healthy and rearing for breakout season in final year of contract.
79. Cecil Shorts -- Exciting player could be held back by shoddy quarterback play.
80. Dennis Pitta -- Could lead Baltimore in catches if receiver corps stays as is.
81. Shane Vereen -- Arguably more talented all-around back than teammate Ridley.
82. Danario Alexander -- Fear he'll be a bit overdrafted after last year's second half.
83. Tavon Austin -- Sam Bradford has always peppered slot receivers with targets.

84. Isaiah Pead -- Most talented running backin STL should lead Rams in carries.

Eighth Round

 

85. Josh Gordon -- Two-game suspension will make him a better value in drafts.
86. Rashard Mendenhall -- The tentative favorite for Cardinals lead tailback duties.
87. Mark Ingram -- Sean Payton sounds committed to restoring Saints run game.
88. Tony Romo -- Annual QB value pick; Cowboys will continue to lean on pass.
89. Zac Stacy -- If Pead doesn't win the Rams' starting job, Stacy is next man up.
90. Ben Tate -- As Arian Foster shows signs of breakdown, Tate is next man up.
91. Miles Austin -- Doesn't offer the ceiling he once did; now a low-upside WR3.
92. Mike Williams -- Touchdown-dependent player hurts you when he doesn't score.
93. Lance Moore -- Quietly coming off career-best season with role still on the rise.
94. Anquan Boldin -- Candidate to be overvalued; can't carry 49ers receiving load.
95. Stevie Johnson -- Bills' transition to run-heavy offense will hurt Johnson's stats.
96. Ryan Broyles -- Getting little hype, but breakout candidate if health cooperates.

Ninth Round

97. Daryl Richardson -- Rams seem to fancy Richardson as change-of-pace back.
98. BenJarvus Green-Ellis -- Giovani Bernard pick torpedoed Law Firm's fantasy value.
99. Andre Brown -- Potential goal-line and passing-down vulture behind David Wilson.
100. Bryce Brown -- Could offer standalone flex value in Chip Kelly's run-based attack.
101. Ben Roethlisberger -- Major weapons losses, but benefits from QB-friendly offense.
102. Martellus Bennett -- Likely increasingly pass-happy Bears' No. 2 receiving option.
103. Greg Olsen -- Steady, if low-upside TE1 remains Panthers' No. 2 pass catcher.
104. Jermichael Finley -- Annual underachiever teased with solid 2012 second half.
105. Kyle Rudolph -- Red-zone stud but not a dynamic receiver between the twenties.
106. Ryan Williams -- Should have every opportunity to beat out Mendenhall to start.
107. Jacquizz Rodgers -- Will remain involved in offense despite S-Jax acquisition.
108. Jared Cook -- Candidate to lead Rams in both receiving yards and TD catches.


Tenth Round

109. Owen Daniels -- DeAndre Hopkins hurts TE1 appeal.
110. Vick Ballard -- Colts' Bradshaw flirtation is telling.
111. Justin Blackmon -- Suspended but WR2/3 on return.
112. Denarius Moore -- Inconsistent & worsening QB play.
113. DeAndre Hopkins -- Hopkins and Daniels may offset each other in run-first attack.
114. Vincent Brown -- Seems to be ascending; saw first-team reps at Chargers OTAs.
115. Emmanuel Sanders -- Will be every-down receiver for the first time in his career.
116. Jeremy Maclin -- No. 2 or 3 pass-catching option in Philly's new run-first offense.
117. Jay Cutler -- Offers some breakout appeal in Marc Trestman's pass-happy attack.
118. Joe Flacco -- Production soared last season after Ravens fired OC Cam Cameron.
119. Jordan Cameron -- Probably the top breakout candidate of all fantasy tight ends.
120. Eli Manning -- Giants temporary passing-based offense is likely thing of the past.

Eleventh Round

121. Mikel Leshoure -- Becomes every-week RB2/flex again if Reggie Bush goes down.
122. Bernard Pierce -- The coaches love him, but needs Ray Rice injury to really matter.
123. Michael Floyd -- Promising first step; he's running ahead of Andre Roberts at OTAs.
124. Michael Bush -- Always a solid, consistent producer when Matt Forte misses time.
125. Mike Goodson -- Behind only injury-prone Chris Ivory on Jets backfield depth chart.
126. Sam Bradford -- Will play with best supporting cast of his NFL career this season.
127. Michael Vick -- Boom-or-bust QB2 gamble has some renaissance-year potential.
128. Carson Palmer -- Shaky bet to last 16 games, but Cards will throw it around yard.
129. Josh Freeman -- Likely to disappoint any owners counting on repeat of 2012 stats.
130. Antonio Gates -- A middling TE2 at this point in rapidly declining Chargers offense.
131. Brandon Myers -- Highly efficient receiver could be sneaky back-end TE1 in PPR.
132. Brandon Pettigrew -- Has big name, but very overrated in both real life in fantasy.

Twelfth Round

133. Rob Housler -- Bruce Arians' history of TE neglect may curb breakout potential.
134. Sidney Rice -- Will see fewer targets with Percy Harvin added to receiver corps.
135. Kendall Wright -- Many mouths to feed in Tennessee's QB-limited pass offense.
136. Darrius Heyward-Bey -- Some indications DHB could start over T.Y. Hilton.
137. Brian Quick -- Current ADP is undrafted; shades of Vincent Jackson in his game.
138. Rueben Randle -- Question marks surrounding both Giants starting receivers.
139. Santonio Holmes -- Talented headcase's Lisfranc recovery is behind schedule.
140. Nate Washington -- Would be much more interesting in a place like Baltimore.
141. Cordarrelle Patterson -- Legit playmaker with only Jerome Simpson to beat out.
142. Alshon Jeffery -- Intermediate-to-deep misfit for new high-percentage offense.
143. Brian Hartline -- 2012 will probably go down as the best stat line of his career.
144. Chris Givens -- Streak-route deep threat may struggle for targets this season.

Thirteenth Round

145. Ryan Tannehill -- Probably another year (and OC) away from fantasy breakout.
146. Shonn Greene -- Titans' short-yardage/goal-line specialist behind CJ?K for now.
147. Pierre Thomas -- Snaps could take hit as Saints increase Mark Ingram's role.
148. Fred Jackson -- Turned 32 in February; behind C.J. Spiller on Bills depth chart.
149. DeAngelo Williams -- At best, lesser half of Panthers running-back committee.
150. Ronnie Hillman -- Broncos envision him as change-of-pace back and no more.

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Josh Norman critiques Roger Goodell, fires warning shot about coming penalties

Josh Norman critiques Roger Goodell, fires warning shot about coming penalties

Josh Norman is great talker. He almost always has something provocative to say, and his Bleacher Report interview published Thursday didn't buck the trend. 

Norman's sneering at NFC East receivers Odell Beckham Jr. and Dez Bryant drew immediate, look-what-he-just-said attention.

But let's not gloss over the larger theme of this interview: Norman thinks the NFL is headed down the wrong path. The timid path. 

In his five seasons, the Redskins corner has been on the receiving end of flags and fines for taunting and excess contact. And yet he told Bleacher Report that he's never once met commissioner Roger Goodell. 

Asked how he would handle the commissioner job differently, Norman started with interpersonal basics. 

"First, I would change how I handle people. For one, you don't show up anywhere. You don't show up where the players show up. So how are you going to know what they want?"

"If this is the guy who is your commissioner, who makes all these rules, wouldn't you think you'd want to see him other than when you get in trouble?" he continued. "Why would I see you if I'm in trouble—what's the point? Why wouldn't I see you before then so you can eliminate that?"

MORE REDSKINS: Scouting each opponent on the Redskins' 2017 schedule

But Norman's criticism morphed from finding fault with Goodell to dissatisfaction with the overall evolution of the league.

You're going to recognize this argument. It starts with defensive players lamenting how NFL rules have moved to limit contact, turning guys timid. 

"Now you have to stop and think about it before you actually hit somebody or you're going to get fined," Norman said. "But where's the offense getting fined?"

Then comes the nostalgia for the old days when football players were tough, as opposed to today, when everyone is Mary's little lamb. 

"Playing the way people used to play it in the old days. Like Mike Haynes. Those kinds of guys. Lester Hayes. People who played it with violence and ruthlessness," Norman said when asked what kind of legacy he wants to leave. "Lockjaw. No pussyfooting around. No inching off. None of that softness."

It's that soft mindset of the modern world that's diluting football, and the young guys are part of the problem. 

"We have too many soft guys, too many guys coming up saying, 'I don't know....' Playing their little off, soft technique," he complained. "That's how the soft mind-set of this world has us thinking now."

MORE REDSKINS: Trent Murphy trying to move on from 'gut-wrenching' suspension

This line of reasoning should be very familiar so far, but most that espouse it stop short of saying what they're going to do about it.

Not Norman. 

"You can't touch guys after five yards. ... Screw that! Hands on. Call it if you call it. So what. You're going to have to call it all game."

"I want him to see me with my hands in his face. That's what I want you to see. In their chest, their breast plate, so they cough up air. They skip a beat in their heart kind of thing," Norman said. 

So ... expect some rule-stretching this season? Perhaps against NFC East opponents?

"Trust me when I tell you, it's going to be bad blood this year," he warned. "There's going to be a lot of fines and maybe some suspensions. I'm going to be honest with you: This s--- is going to get really ugly. Because I do have a safety that don't give a f--- and I definitely don't."

"I'm letting all hell break loose."

Well, then. Noted. We'll let the league – and the Redskins – decide how to feel about this plan. 

MORE REDSKINS: Redskins’ Norman confident that changes will improve defense

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'I'm letting all hell break loose' – Josh Norman belittles Dez Bryant and Odell Beckham Jr.

'I'm letting all hell break loose' – Josh Norman belittles Dez Bryant and Odell Beckham Jr.

NFC East opponents don't challenge Josh Norman. Dez Bryant and Odell Beckham, Jr. are fake tough, no real threat to him. Not like some other receivers in the NFL. 

At least that's how the Redskins corner described them in a wide-ranging interview with Bleacher Report published on Thursday. 

The gist? The Cowboys and Giants stars get no respect from Norman, though both were involved in memorable feuds with him the past year. 

Norman got his first opportunity to talk trash when asked to do word association with the name "Dez Bryant." He took the opening and returned it for a touchdown. 

"That's a guy. Just a guy. Dez was Dez in 2012, '13, '14. Maybe '14. Now? He's a guy," Norman said.

"He doesn't 'wow' you. For me, he don't. For other guys, he probably will do the worst to them because he'll bully them. But you can't bully a bully. You know what I'm saying? That's why his game doesn't resonate to me."

To jog your memory, Norman and Bryant went at it after the Cowboys beat the Redskins on Thanksgiving last year. Bryant said Washington should get a refund on Norman's contract. There was also drama about whether Norman falsely accused Bryant of threatening to "unload the clip" on him.

Real mature, substantive conflict. 

RELATED: Redskins’ Norman confident that changes will improve defense

The Redskins corner didn't go any easier on Beckham, who of all receivers in the league has had the most explosive run-ins with Norman. 

In fact, Beckham's helmet-to-helmet hit on Norman in a 2015 contest between the Giants and Panthers led the NFL to change rules for ejections. Beckham had racked up three unnecessary roughness penalties in that game. 

"[Beckham] tries to be a tough guy. He tries to put on this persona which he's not. Because he's always going to have his head on a swivel. Always. Always when we play each other," Norman said, suggesting that he's able to push OBJ over the edge and out of control. 

"He's scary like that. He does things that he normally wouldn't do because of all the pressure and added hype that he has to put on his whole persona. He's not this guy. If you go back and watch the games in which we play compared to the games we don't play each other, he's a totally different guy."

"When people get physical, tough, like the Minnesota game, he acts out. He's a kid. He's a big kid, man," Norman concluded.

It must have been an exercise in restraint not to mention OBJ's kicking-net tantrum after losing to the Redskins last year. 

As the interview moved on, there wasn't a receiver that drew respect from Norman until the name Julio Jones came up. Norman got to see the Falcons receiver twice a year when he played for Carolina in the NFC South. 

"Now, that is the ultimate challenge. That's when I can do things in a split-second, a millisecond, just choo-choo-choo," Norman said of facing Jones. He said he's missed that challenge since moving to the NFC East. 

"It's the worst. Because I'm just battling 'guys.' I'm not battling against something I can call 'greatness.' I'm not enhancing my craft. Don't get me wrong. They're tough. But they're not [Jones]," he said. He also named Pittsburgh's Antonio Brown and Chicago's Alshon Jeffrey as other receivers who could provide a real test. 

But whether those matchups excite Norman or not, he knows they can't touch the hype of NFC East showdowns, especially ones involving Beckham. 

"That game gets so hyped up by the time we play them, it won't even be Giants vs. Washington—it'll be me and him. ... Because now you have us on Thanksgiving Night. C'mon, man!"

The interview ended with Norman looking forward to playing with new Redskins safety DJ Swearinger, who has a reputation as a hard-hitting intimidator.

"Trust me when I tell you, it's going to be bad blood this year. You think the NFC East didn't like each other before? This year right here? There's going to be a lot of fines and maybe some suspensions. I'm going to be honest with you: This s--- is going to get really ugly. Because I do have a safety that don't give a f--- and I definitely don't. And I know they don't have that many people on the offense who do on their side."

"I'm letting all hell break loose."

MORE REDSKINS: Josh Doctson ready to show the NFL, "I'm good at what I do"