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Should the Redskins draft a receiver?

Should the Redskins draft a receiver?

As we noted yesterday, the Redskins have eight wide receivers on the roster. NFL teams generally carry a dozen receivers during minicamps and training camp so they will almost certainly add some wide receivers to the roster.

The question is, will they add camp fodder, bodies who will catch passes in practice, try go get a few good plays on film during preseason games, and then get cut when the games start to count? Might they add some marginal talent that might compete for a spot at the lower end of the depth chart? Or will the aim to bring in a player who will seriously compete for playing time?

The latter option likely means spending a high or mid-round draft pick at the position. In a draft that is deep in wide receivers it is very easy to envision scenario where the Redskins’ turn comes up in, say, round 3 and the best player on the board is a wide receiver. In fact, if teams wait on drafting receivers because there are so many the two or three best players on the board could be wide receivers.

What should the Redskins do? Your third-rounder isn’t expected to start right away but he should at some point in the next year or so. But on the Redskins the top three wide receivers, DeSean Jackson, Pierre Garçon, and Andre Roberts, are all still in their primes and under contract for three more years. Since rookies get four-year contracts a 2014 draft pick would be entering the final year of his deal before getting a shot at a starting job.

Still, despite needs in other areas, the Redskins should seriously consider taking the best player available even if that player happens to be a wide receiver.

For one thing, the receivers in line behind the three top are nothing to write home about. Santana Moss will be 35 soon, Leonard Hankerson is coming off of his second major injury in three years in the league and Aldrick Robinson has yet to show that he’s anything more than a fast guy. Should Jackson, Roberts, or Garçon miss any significant time there would be a considerable drop off in ability.

And, as we know, contracts in the NFL are far from ironclad. The Redskins could release Garçon and Roberts next year with minimal cap pain and Jackson could go in 2016. Although right now it’s difficult to imagine circumstances under which the Redskins would want to make any of those moves things can change in a hurry. And they can change very fast if there is a younger and cheaper backup pushing hard for some playing time.

Certainly if the Redskins end up getting a wide receiver at any point during the draft the critics will be out screaming about other needs. They will have a case, especially if a player at a position of need goes shortly after the Redskins’ pick. But injuries happen. Jackson and Garçon missed five and six games with injuries in 2012, respectively. If November rolls around and one or two of the top receivers are sidelined they won’t worry about what was said in early May.

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Need to Know: Did the Redskins underachieve in 2016?

Need to Know: Did the Redskins underachieve in 2016?

Here is what you need to know on this Wednesday, January 18, 99 days before the NFL draft.

Timeline

Days until:
NFL franchise tag deadline 43
NFL free agency starts 51
First Sunday of 2017 season 236

The coordinator search and more

Did the Redskins underachieve this year? I know that a metric like Football Outsiders' DVOA is not the final word in the quality of a team but looking at it year after year it usually does work out that the teams with the better numbers in DVOA usually win more games than those with worse numbers. The Redskins finished 2016 eighth in DVOA. Considering that 12 teams make the playoffs, that could be considered a playoff quality team. Yet 15 teams finished with a better record than they did. I’m sure there are some holes in the formula for the stat but just looking at that it sure appears that the Redskins did leave some wins out on the field.

John Keim is reporting that the Redskins are prepared to switch to a 4-3 defense if that is what their new defensive coordinator prefers. They have been in the 3-4 since Mike Shanahan arrived in 2010. Whether it is because of the scheme or lack of draft and free agent resources spent on the line and at safety, the defense hasn’t been very good. As Keim notes, they will need to make some personnel changes if they do change but with a full load of draft picks and $62 million in cap space this may be the time to do it.

I expected the angst that was all over Twitter when word of the Rob Ryan interview got out. But it’s pretty dumb to get all worked up over an interview (with all due respect to readers here who may have been upset). It’s not a hiring. Look, somehow or another Ryan managed to stay employed as an NFL defensive coordinator for 12 straight seasons. I don’t know how to research it without going through some very time consuming and tedious steps but I’d be willing to bet that only about a few dozen men in the history of the league have been able to remain a defensive coordinator for that many season in a row. The organization can learn something from sitting down and talking to him for a few hours.

I understand that we want things to talk about in a relatively slow time. But I just don’t see why there is fear out there over the possibility that Kyle Shanahan will get hired as the coach of the 49ers and somehow steal Kirk Cousins away to be his quarterback. The Redskins can maintain his rights via the franchise tag. They could tag Cousins and trade him to the 49ers but there would be a heavy price in terms of draft picks. But while it’s possible, it’s unlikely. The chances are very, very good that Cousins will be in a Redskins uniform this year via either the tag or a long-term deal. 

Tandler on Twitter

In case you missed it

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page www.Facebook.com/RealRedskins and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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#RedskinsTalk Podcast Episode 40 - Seriously, when will the Redskins pick a coordinator?

#RedskinsTalk Podcast Episode 40 - Seriously, when will the Redskins pick a coordinator?

As the Redskins settle into the offseason without both an offensive and defensive coordinator, JP Finlay and Rich Tandler debate who will get the jobs, and when they will be announced. 

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