Quick Links

Redskins fans should root for Ravens

Redskins fans should root for Ravens

If fans of the Washington Redskins are looking for a rooting interest in the NFL playoffs, they should look about 32 miles to the north of FedEx Field to M&T Bank Stadium.

They should think purple.

Yes, Redskins fans should be rooting for the Baltimore Ravens to win the Super Bowl.

I know that the idea is anywhere from repulsive to uncomfortable to most. It's just not natural to want to root for the team from the neighboring city. It certainly doesn't feel right to me, although the feeling is more towards uneasy and less towards physically ill.

But Redskins fans should set aside such feelings out of pure self-interest.

Huh?

Stick with me here. This is about Dan Snyder and the mix of insecurity, jealousy, and competitive fire that drives him.

Should the Ravens win the Super Bowl that will make two titles in the time that Snyder has owned the Redskins. Two titles in a period of time when Snyder's team has won a grand total of two playoff games. Two titles in a period of time during which anyone associated with Snyder's team would have to buy a ticket to attend so much as a conference championship game.

The Redskins owner clearly would be the owner of the inferior team in the region. It wouldn't even be debatable. Actually, it's not debatable that the Ravens are the superior team and organization right now, even if they were to lose to the Titans this weekend, but another championship would convince even those wearing glasses with lenses of the deepest shades of burgundy and gold of that fact.

It might even convince those with a vested interest in the way the Redskins do business to reconsider the way things work in Ashburn.

The Redskins and the Ravens couldn't be more different when it comes to football operations. Baltimore owner Steve Bisciotti offers encouragement and signs checks but otherwise stays out of the way. He lets Ozzie Newsome, his fine, talented general manager, draft the players and make the other player personnel decisions.

Snyder also offers encouragement and signs checks but he does not otherwise stay out of the way. While the extent of his involvement in player personnel decisions is unclear, the fact that he's involved at all is not good. Vinny Cerrato, one of the least talented and respected men in an NFL GM-type role, has some authority and that also is not good.

The Ravens, by and large, build through the draft and they build from the lines out. The Redskins think flashy skill players first and their plan for building consists of whatever seems like a good idea at the time.

The Ravens, in other words, have the traditional NFL setup and build in the traditional NFL way. The methods are traditional because they work.

Should there be a parade in downtown Baltimore in early February, Snyder would look up north with that mix of jealousy and desire to win. Steve Bisciotti holding up the Lombardi Trophy would be a life-altering moment for him. It would force him to take a serious look at the way he does things.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and Snyder would be loathe to flatter the Ravens by immediately restructuring the Redskins organization and revamping its philosophy. But certainly a Ravens title would be a hard nudge in that direction and that would be a positive development.

Quick Links

Redskins release Dashaun Phillips, again

Redskins release Dashaun Phillips, again

Cornerback Dashaun Phillips had a very short return to the Redskins’ active roster.

Phillips, who started the season as the nickel cornerback before being benched and eventually released and moved to the practice squad last month, was re-signed to the roster on Friday. He made the trip to Arizona but he was inactive for the game. The Redskins announced today that he has been released again.

It is possible for Phillips to return to the practice squad if he clears through waivers.

The transaction clears a roster spot for the return of offensive tackle Trent Williams, who has been suspended for the last four games.

Quick Links

Jamison Crowder's touchdown dance was better than his touchdown

Jamison Crowder's touchdown dance was better than his touchdown

Among all the darkness and depression that has followed after the Redskins' 31-23 loss to the Cardinals on Sunday, one bright, shining light has emerged: Jamison Crowder's touchdown celebration.

Late in the third quarter, the second-year wideout was on the receiving end of a 26-yard Kirk Cousins strike, which put his team in the lead on the game's scoreboard by three. However, it's what he did post-catch that put his team in the lead by a far larger margin on the swagboard.

Feast your eyes on this dance, and if you've already seen it, feast your eyes on it again. And again. And AGAIN:

Do you see how much Juju he put on that beat? And did you catch how he gave the ref a little somethin'-somethin' right at the end of the sequence? Calling that flawless would be an insult to Crowder.

Apparently, Jay Gruden was heard screaming at his players in the locker room as they were processing the matchup's result Sunday night. Is it possible he was just loudly complimenting Crowder's moves?

MORE REDSKINS: BARRY, COUSINS BOTH COOL OFF IN OUR REPORT CARD