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Redskins Combine Countdown: Virginia safety Anthony Harris

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Redskins Combine Countdown: Virginia safety Anthony Harris

The NFL Combine gets underway in Indianapolis in just 7 days. I will be there and in between now and then I’ll be doing a lot of work getting up to speed on the draft class of 2015. Along the way I’ll be sharing some of what I find out with Real Redskins readers. The focus will be on players in areas of need for the Redskins but I might look at players at just about any position since Scot McCloughan has said that he will take the best player available regardless of need.

Anthony Harris
Safety
Virginia

Height: 6-1
Weight: 190

What they’re saying:
STRENGTHS: At 6-1, Harris has a lean, wiry frame with long arms and nice proportion throughout. He makes good breaks on the ball with a strong first step despite his long-striding run style, and has quick hips and a second gear to recover over the top when plays go vertical.

WEAKNESSES: Despite the durability Harris showed at Virginia, his lanky frame looks better suited to cornerback or even wide receiver than safety. He isn't an intimidating hitter over the middle and resorts to ankle tackling, at times -- though to his credit, he's a generally reliable open-field tackler.
Derek Stephens and Rob Rang, CBS Sports

How he fits the Redskins: I wrote about the possibility of Harris being the Redskins’ starting strong safety at some point during the 2015 season. The position is a major need for the Redskins and Harris could be sharp enough to get up to speed in time to start at some point during his rookie year. Harris logged plenty of playing time at Virginia, seeing substantial action as a freshman and becoming the starter his last three years there.

At 6-1, he’s probably just about at the bottom end of the height that Scot McCloughan is looking for in a safety. Some analysts think he’s better at free safety, some prefer him at strong. As the NFL often requires players to be adept at both, that versatility could be a good thing.

Potential issues: The other side of the size coin is the “lanky” description. Can he add on weight and still move as well? If he plays smaller than his height he won’t fit into McCloughan’s long-term vision for a “Legion of Boom” sized backfield.

Bottom line: It’s tough to rely on any draft pick to start as a rookie, especially on picked after the first round. The second round might be a reach for Harris; the third is likely where his value is. Out of 36 third-round picks in 2014, just nine started at least half of their teams’ games as rookies. Having the pick earlier in the round does help. Four of the players who had eight or more starts were picked in the top 10 selections in the round.

If McCloughan is going to pick Harris in the third round it’s going to be because he thinks he is the best player on the board at the time and that he will be a good player in 2016 and beyond. An immediate need at safety won’t drive the pick.

But sometimes a draft pick steps up when you don’t expect him to, like Bashaud Breeland did in 2014. If the Redskins do take Harris it wouldn’t be shocking to see him as a major contributor by the time the year is out.

Previously in Combine Countdown:

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New #RedskinsTalk Podcast: JP & Tandler break down Redskins draft targets, and players to avoid

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New #RedskinsTalk Podcast: JP & Tandler break down Redskins draft targets, and players to avoid

How plausible is a draft day trade? Could the Redskins move up? And what to do about all those 'diluted samples'? JP Finlay and Rich Tandler break it all down.

<<<LOOKING AT REDSKINS DRAFT PROSPECTS>>>

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

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Redskins roster by the numbers: Defense

Redskins roster by the numbers: Defense

The Redskins currently have 75 players on their roster. They are about to add some more in the draft and as undrafted free agents. They can have up to 90 players on their offseason roster. Year after year the distribution of those players to positions are consistent. We can look at what they have and see what they need to sign to get through OTAs, minicamp, and training camp.

Let’s break down the numbers by position and see where they will need to add players to get to where they want to be going into training camp. Last week we looked at the offense; today we’ll look at the numbers on defense.

End

Have: 6
Need: 8

Just like in a game, you want plenty of players to rotate through the line in the heat of training camp. They could carry one or two additional players here since they are legitimately in search of players who can have an impact beyond starters Terrelle McClain and Stacy McGee and pass rushing project Anthony Lanier.  

Nose Tackle

Have: 2
Need: 4

Like with the ends, you want to have a few big guys to rotate in when it gets hot in Richmond. It would be surprising if the Redskins didn’t add a nose tackle to the mix in the draft, probably on Saturday.

Inside linebacker

Have: 9
Need: 8

If the Redskins take an inside linebacker in the draft, as many expect that will, this position would get very crowded. They could keep as many as six on the final 53-man roster if there are a couple of key special teams players in the group.

RELATED: NFL Mock Draft Version 10.0

Outside linebacker

Have: 7
Need: 7

They could keep an extra one or two if they find some in the draft. You can’t have too many pass rushers, although they have kept just four on the final roster recently.  

Cornerback

Have: 7
Need: 8

It has always seemed to be a little odd to me that they’ll bring in a dozen wide receivers and only seven or eight corners.

MORE REDSKINS: Redskins mock 2.0 goes offense early, defense often

Safety

Have: 7
Need: 7

The depth chart here is unusual in that all seven players have significant NFL playing time; there is no “training camp fodder” here. If the draft one, an experienced player might be let go.  

Total defensive players under contract: 38
Total needed for camp: 41

There are 34 offensive players and three specialists on the roster, making the total 75. If they don’t make deals and use all 10 of their draft picks that will leave just five spots to sign undrafted free agents. They likely will want to sign more than that meaning that some of the players currently on the roster will end up getting cut, particularly those on the defensive side.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.