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Redskins’ camp remains fan unfriendly

Redskins’ camp remains fan unfriendly

With the departure of Joe Gibbs and the arrival of Jim Zorn, some things have changed about the Washington Redskins' training camp while some things have remained the same.

One change is that camp no longer is built by Home Depot; instead, it will be presented by RE/MAX (properly typed in all caps and with the front slash). Instead of an area where kids could be amused by playing on work benches with toy hammers, maybe there will be a place where they can fill out sub-prime mortgage applications.

One thing that won't change is that Redskins fans will have very limited opportunities to see the team in camp. Here's the complete schedule of practices that will be open to the public (don't blink, you might miss it):

Sunday, July 20
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Monday, July 21
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Tuesday, July 22
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Wednesday, July 23
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Thursday, July 24
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Friday, July 25
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Saturday, July 26
Includes Intra-squad Scrimmage
Individual drills begins at 1:20 p.m. ET
Scrimmage begins at 2 p.m. ET

Sunday, July 27
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

Monday, July 28
Open Practice, Morning
8:30 a.m. ET

That's it. Nine practices in nine days, no more than one in any single day. That's makes the Redskins among the least fan-friendly teams in the NFL in this respect.

Not all teams have their camp schedules out yet, but I pulled up a few at random. Between July 25 and August 20, the Buffalo Bills will have 20 practices open to their fans, including two days where both practices are open. The San Diego Chargers will have 15 open practices between July 25 and August 14. The Packers have a reputation for being one of the most fan friendly organizations in the league and they back that up with 24 open practices in 32 days. Their fans can go see them up until 10 days before the season opens.

For the past several years, the Redskins have had fewer than 10 open practices each camp. I always thought it was a Gibbs thing, but the practice has outlasted his tenure.

I've stepped up onto my virtual soapbox in the past and I've gone on about how such limited availability isn't doing right by the fans and is hurting the team in the long term as camp is the only opportunity many kids who may or may not be future fans have to see the team in person.

But nobody else seems to care so, while I still feel the same way, no rant is following here. Apparently, the Redskins believe that this is the best thing for the team, despite the fact that most other teams think that more is better.

But Dan Snyder, Vinny Cerrato and company don't tend to do things the way the rest of the crowd does them. That has served them well in some instances—especially when it comes to making money—and not so well in others.

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Redskins defensive coordinator resume: Jason Tarver

Redskins defensive coordinator resume: Jason Tarver

The Redskins have interviewed some high-profile candidates for their open defensive coordinator position. When it was reported that they will meet with former Raiders defensive coordinator Jason Tarver, the reaction among the fans was, “Who?”

Let’s take a look at what Tarver’s qualifications are to get the job of running the Redskins’ defense.

Before becoming a coordinator: At the age of 22, Tarver took a coaching job at West Valley College in California, and did that while earning his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Santa Clara. After that he was a graduate assistant at UCLA for three years before getting into the NFL in 2001, when the 49ers hired him as a quality control coach. Tarver worked his way up to outside linebackers coach in 2005 and did that job until 2010, when he was let go went Mike Singletary was fired as the head coach. After a year as the defensive coordinator at Stanford, Dennis Allen hired Tarver to run the Raiders defense in 2012.

More Redskins: Early first-round draft possibilities

Note: If you want more complete stats on Tarver’s defenses check out his page on Pro Football Reference. DVOA stats via Football Outsiders. A negative DVOA percentage is better than a positive number. Zero is average.

For players, * designates Pro Bowl selection, + designates first-team All-Pro

2012 Raiders (4-12)

Rankings: Yards 5,672 (18th), points 443 (28th), takeaways 19 (26th), 3rd down 39.1% (20th), DVOA 12.5% 29th
Notable players: DT Richard Seymour, DE Lamarr Houston

It should be noted that Allen had a defensive background so he had a hand in these numbers. This team just wasn’t very good as indicated by the fact that Seymour, at age 33, was one of their best defensive players.

2013 Raiders (4-12)

Rankings: Yards 5,918 (22nd), points 453 (29th), takeaways 22 (21st), 3rd down 43.1% (28th), DVOA 10.3% (26th)
Notable players: S Charles Woodson

They did make an effort to shore up the defense by bringing back Woodson and drafting cornerback D.J. Hayden in the first round. But Hayden only played in eight games and Woodson could only contribute so much at age 37. The pass defense struggled, ranking 29th in DVOA.

Related: Redskins offensive coordinator resume: Matt Cavanaugh

2014 Raiders (3-13)

Rankings: 5,721 (21st), points 452 (32nd), takeaways 14 (30th), 3rd down 38.5% (14th), DVOA 6.3% (26th)
Notable players: LB Khalil Mack, S Woodson

Allen was fired after an 0-4 start and Tony Sparano took over as interim head coach the rest of the way. Sparano has an offensive background so perhaps Tarver is more fully accountable for these results than those in other seasons. They did draft Mack with the fifth overall pick but his impact as a rookie was limited as recorded four sacks. Hayden again missed half of the season and, again, the defense was near the bottom of the NFL.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page www.Facebook.com/RealRedskins and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Award Tour: JP & Tandler select Redskins Offensive Player of the Year

Award Tour: JP & Tandler select Redskins Offensive Player of the Year

With the 2017 offseason about to kick into high gear, Redskins Insiders JP Finlay and Rich Tandler are going to take one last look at 2016 in the coming days. That’s right, it’s time to hand out awards for Coach of the Year, Special Teams Player of the Year, Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year and Offensive Player of the Year.

We’ve picked our top coaches and the Special Teams. and defensive POY’s. Today we select the Offensive Player of the Year.

Tandler: I don’t see any need to overthink this. The Redskins set a team record for total offensive yards in a season and it was mostly due to the play of Kirk Cousins. He shattered his own team records in nearly every major passing stat. He was a steady hand as the line underwent some turmoil with the suspension of Trent Williams and injury situations. His primary running backs were a fumble-prone second-year player and an undrafted rookie. The team’s best pass catcher, tight end Jordan Reed, missed four games with injuries and he was obviously hampered by a shoulder injury in a few others. Cousins did slump towards the end of the season and the interception he threw late in the season finale killed off the Redskins’ playoff chances. But he was the one primarily responsible for the team posting winning record in consecutive seasons for the first time in nearly 20 years.

More Redskins: Early first-round draft possibilities

Finlay: I kinda wanted to overthink this but Tandler yelled at me. DeSean Jackson was arguably the Redskins best threat, and Pierre Garçon was the most dependable player on the team. Jordan Reed showed how great he can be, but injuries limited his performance. In the end, the award goes to Kirk Cousins. It has to. The guy nearly threw for 5,000 yards and he broke his own passing record that he set last season. What happens before the March 1 franchise deadline not withstanding, Cousins was the 'Skins best offensive player in 2016.

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