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No need to rush to judgment on Redskins' RG3

No need to rush to judgment on Redskins' RG3

A year ago, former Redskins quarterback and current ESPN analyst Mark Brunell believed that current Redskins QB Robert Griffin III would successfully complete the transition from being a scrambling quarterback to being more of a pocket passer.

“He can get there. He’s one of the best young quarterbacks in the league and he got there because he’s a great athlete and he’ll be coached well,” Brunell said in May of 2014. “He’ll be fine. Other young quarterbacks couldn’t get to that point. He won’t be one of those guys. He’s smart.”

Griffin struggled in his first season in new coach Jay Gruden’s system. He hesitated when the should have pulled the trigger, looked to scramble when he should have hung in the pocket, and generally looked like a fish out of water.

Fast forward to this week and we find that Brunell has changed his tune on Griffin’s future.

“There were a series of things that were wrong with RGIII, and it really starts with his fundamentals,” Brunell said on “NFL Live” via the Washington Post. “Unfortunately for the young quarterback, he has gone backwards.”

Host Stephen A. Smith asked him if he thought that Griffin could overcome his issues and become a successful NFL quarterback.

“I do not,” Brunell replied.

So nine games and 214 pass attempts were enough to prompt Brunell to change his opinion on Griffin’s future a full 180 degrees. Yes, Griffin did look bad at times (a lot of the time, in fact) but let’s consider sample size here. He threw about a third the number of passes that league leaders Drew Brees and Matt Ryan did and less than half of what Blake Bortles and Alex Smith threw.

It appears that Brunell overrated Griffin’s chances for success a year ago and now he is underrating his chances. After all, this is sports talk where the “hot take” rules. “He’ll make the Pro Bowl” is a hot take. So is “he’ll fall flat on his face.”

But “let’s wait and see how this plays out” doesn’t cut it even though it’s usually the right stance to take. Such statements will have ESPN or whoever is employing the analyst looking through resumes and audition tapes for a replacement who will deliver the hot takes.

The truth is that a year ago there was no certainty that Griffin would eventually succeed. Today there is no certainty that he will not.

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Need to Know: What is the Redskins' plan for QB Kirk Cousins?

Need to Know: What is the Redskins' plan for QB Kirk Cousins?

Here is what you need to know on this Tuesday, March 28, 30 days before the April 27 NFL draft.

Timeline

Days until:

—Offseason workouts begin (4/17) 20
—Redskins rookie camp (5/12) 45
—Redskins OTAs start (5/24) 57
—Franchise tag contract deadline (7/15) 109
—First Sunday of 2017 season (9/10) 157

Tuesday three and out

1. Maybe Bruce Allen and the Redskins have a master plan for saving the whole Kirk Cousins situation but right now it just looks like they’re stuck without a solution to paying $24 million to a quarterback who likely will be gone in a year. That’s money that could either be rolled over into future seasons if Cousins gets traded or used as a down payment on a long-term Cousins deal. Maybe there’s a master plan there somewhere but right now it looks an awful lot like the organization is just stumbling around in the dark, stubbing its toe while trying to find the light switch.

2. WR Brian Quick will cost the Redskins less against the salary cap than they are paying him. That’s because his contract takes advantage of the minimum salary benefit. He gets the sixth-year minimum salary of $775,000 plus an $85,000 signing bonus, a total of $860,000. Because of the minimum salary and low signing bonus the CBA rules allow the team to essentially discount the cap hit for the contract down to $695,000. The rule is designed so that younger players are necessarily cheaper, at least when it comes to the salary cap.

RELATED: NFL Mock Draft Version 6.0

3. Allen hinted that the Redskins won’t necessarily hire a general manager after the draft. While talking to colleague JP Finlay he said, “We’ll talk about what we need after the draft from a staffing standpoint.” Not “we’ll search high and low for the best GM in the business” but that needs will be examined. It’s going to be interesting to see how it all shakes out.

And out—Allen didn’t have much to say when JP asked about the stadium project that was a hot topic a year or so ago, only confirming that talks are ongoing. The fact that he had so little to say, not even some platitudes about the desire to build a great environment for the fans. Reading between the lines, this makes me think that a deal is getting close and the less that is said about it at this point the better. Virginia governor Terry McAuliffe will be term limited out of office next January and the feeling is that he will want to leave a Redskins stadium deal as his legacy.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Bruce Allen goes full Belichick when talking about Snapchat

Bruce Allen goes full Belichick when talking about Snapchat

When it comes to incorrectly identifying the names of social media platforms, Bill Belichick is the standard-bearer and industry leader. Examples of terms recently uttered by the head coach include gems like "MyFace" and "Yearbook," as the football icon has demonstrated he's somewhat aware of the sites and apps yet doesn't really care about them.

Bruce Allen, though, may have just laid claim to Belichick's crown. In a 1-on-1 interview with CSN Redskins Insider JP Finlay, Allen discussed how he's not involved at all on social media and then proceeded to give Snapchat a glorious new name.

"I don't get to pay attention to everything," Allen told Finlay when asked if the team president keeps up with the constant rumors surrounding Washington quarterback Kirk Cousins.

"You're not on Twitter all the time?" Finlay interjected.

"No, I don't have Twitter," Allen answered, laughing, "and I'm not on Snapper-chapper or whatever it's called."

Allen was in the neighborhood by starting off with "Snap," but the rest of his attempt showed he's not exactly on the right street. Fortunately, unlike Belichick, Jay Gruden has gotten Snapchat's name right in the past, and could likely help Allen get used to the app if Allen ever decides to start using it.

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