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Need to Know: Five NFL rule changes that should be approved without debate

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Need to Know: Five NFL rule changes that should be approved without debate

Here is what you need to know on this Friday, March 21, 17 days before the Redskins start their offseason workouts.

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Here are five of the proposed NFL rule changes that should pass with no debate:

Permit a coach to challenge any official’s decision, except scoring plays which are automatically reviewed—I was scoffed at by some when I suggested in this space a couple of months ago that a coach should be able to use his two challenges on anything he thinks should be reviewed. If there’s no indisputable video evidence, the coach loses the challenge and the timeout. Well, now no less than Bill Belichick agrees with me as this is a Patriots proposal.

Re-organize the rules about what can be reviewed and what cannot be reviewed, including making the recovery of a loose ball in the field of play reviewable—OK, if you don’t want to open up offside calls to review how about the big, obvious things like the fumble that Bowman recovered in the NFC title game while being injured?

Allow the referee to consult with members of the NFL officiating department during replay reviews. The referee would be able to speak with the command center in New York to help in reviewing a play—Can you tell I don’t like the replay process? This would let officials in New York do quality control over the review process and they could get a head start on the process while the referee is talking to the coach, making the announcement of the challenge, jogging to the replay booth, and getting the headset on. Better replay calls in less time? Sign me up.

Extend the goal posts an additional five feet above the cross bar—If it increases the accuracy of calls—and this clearly would—just do it and move on. Surprised this needs a three-fourths vote of the owners to get changed. It’s common sense.

Enforce defensive fouls behind the line of scrimmage from the previous spot, rather than from the end of the run or from the spot of the foul—This makes perfect sense. If a team tackles the quarterback by the facemask deep in the pocket, it could only end being penalized five yards past the previous spot. A personal foul penalty should hurt. But if they do this, they need to mark off offensive personal fouls on the offense that are behind the line from the spot of the foul. If there’s a chop block five yards behind the line, enforce it from there.

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Timeline

—It’s been 82 days since the Redskins played a game; it will be about 170 days until they play another one.

—Days until: Offseason workouts start 17; NFL Draft 48; Training camp starts 124

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Redskins draft oft-injured Auburn CB Joshua Holsey with their final pick

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Redskins draft oft-injured Auburn CB Joshua Holsey with their final pick

The Redskins haven't shied away from using draft picks on players with an injury history, and that trend continued all the way to their final pick of the draft with Auburn CB Joshua Holsey.

Holsey missed parts of the 2013 and 2015 seasons at Auburn due to torn ACLs, but rebounded with a strong season in 2016. He had 30 tackles, three interceptions and 10 passes defended in his senior season.

RELATED: REDSKINS ROLL THE DICE ON 7TH ROUND SAFETY

He was overlooked through most of the draft process due to his injury history and was snubbed at the combine. 

The seventh round is a spot to take a flier on a guy who has some traits you like, and this certainly fits the bill with the pick of Joshua Holsey. 

MORE REDSKINS: ANOTHER TALL WR? 3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT ROBERT DAVIS

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All or nothing? Redskins roll dice on 7th-round safety with lots of talent

All or nothing? Redskins roll dice on 7th-round safety with lots of talent

With two picks in the seventh round, the Redskins rolled the dice and selected Josh Harvey-Clemons. A safety from Louisville that started his career at Georgia, Harvey-Clemons was a five star recruit out of high school that eventually left Georgia due to multiple positive drug tests.

His junior year at Louisville, however, was a breakout season for Harvey-Clemons. Here are three things to know:

  1. Testing - At Georgia, Harvey-Clemons dealt with multiple suspensions for marijuana. That had a major impact on his draft status, and will have the eyes of the NFL watching him on the next level.
  2. Size - Harvey-Clemons has the size to play safety in the NFL, or maybe even more of a hybrid role like Su'a Cravens as a rookie. He's listed at 6-foot-4 and 217 lbs. NFL.com describes him with an "alpha mentality."
  3. Keep it together - After sitting out a transfer year, Harvey-Clemons played well at Lousville for two seasons. He logged more than 140 tackles and took ACC conference honors in 2015 and 2016. Whatever problems he had early in his college career (cough pot cough) he controlled at Louisville. If that continues, Harvey Clemons could have a chance at making the Redskins roster.

Simply put? The Redskins rolled the dice on a kid with good size and tackling ability who had problems with marijuana early in his college career. A lot of college students have problems smoking marijuana early in their college career. In the 7th round, this seems like a good gamble.

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