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Need to Know: Redskins first-round trade up-trade down options

Need to Know: Redskins first-round trade up-trade down options

Here is what you need to know on this Wednesday, April 12, 15 days before the April 27 NFL draft.

Timeline

Days until:

—Offseason workouts begin (4/17) 5
—Redskins rookie camp (5/12) 30
—Redskins OTAs start (5/24) 42
—First Sunday of 2017 season (9/10) 151

Trade up/trade down options for the Redskins

I did a mock draft for the Redskins yesterday and when I made the first-round pick there really wasn’t anyone on the board at No. 17 who I thought would have sufficient impact on the team. It was a perfect situation for the Redskins to trade down and collect some more picks or, if they are targeting a particular player, use some of their 10 picks to trade up.

Let’s take the latter scenario first. Suppose the Redskins think that RB Christian McCaffrey will be the perfect addition to change their offense from good to great. But there is credible intel out there that the Eagles, who are drafting three spots earlier at 14th, will take the former Stanford star. What would it take for the Redskins to jump ahead of Philly?

Per the draft pick trade chart, the 17th pick is worth 950 points and the 13th is worth 1,150. To move up to No. 13 the Redskins would have to give up their third-round pick (No. 81, 185 points) and possibly one of their sixth-round picks. The lesson here is that moving up in the first round is very expensive. A third-round pick has about a 50 percent chance of evolving into being a starter at some point.

On the other side, suppose they don’t trade up and they’re looking at the same situation I was the mock yesterday, with nobody particularly appealing on the board. I had it set up so I couldn’t make trades but, of course, that would be an option for the Redskins.

You first thing you have to remember about trading down is that another team has to want to trade up. In other words, another team must look at the same pool of available players that you’re looking at and be excited enough about one of them to give up a future starter as part of a deal to move up.

It’s usually quarterbacks who excite teams enough to make moves so let’s say that Mitchell Trubisky of North Carolina is still hanging around at No. 17 and the Texans, who have the 25th pick, see him as their QB of the future.

The 25th pick is worth 720 points so the Texans would have to come up with 230 points of value to move up. Their third-round pick (No. 81), worth 185, and their fourth rounder (No. 131), 41, would total 226. Bill O’Brien could throw in a few racks of BBQ ribs and they could call it even.

Let’s look at one more trade back that would net the Redskins a bigger haul. Cleveland needs a quarterback and they might think that they can bypass Trubisky with their two first-round picks at No. 1 and No. 12 and move up to get him a little later. The Browns have two second-round picks, No. 33 (580 points) and No. 52 (380 points). Those add up to 960 points, making it just about the right price for Washington’s 950-point pick at 17.

That would leave the Redskins without a first-round pick but they could get some quality players with three second-round picks—their own and the two from the Browns. In fact, with that 33rd pick the Redskins could jump up into the end of the first round with a Saturday pick. Their later fourth-rounder, No. 124 overall, could get them to about pick No. 29.

This is all hypothetical and the value chart is only a guide, not a hard and fast way of doing business. But it does give you an idea of what to look for if the Redskins start wheeling and dealing.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Need to Know: The top five receivers the Redskins will face in 2017

Need to Know: The top five receivers the Redskins will face in 2017

Here is what you need to know on this Wednesday, June 28, 29 days before the Washington Redskins start training camp in Richmond on July 27.

Timeline

The Redskins last played a game 178 days ago; they will open the 2017 season against the Eagles at FedEx Field in 74 days.

Days until:

—Franchise tag contract deadline (7/17) 19
—Preseason opener @ Ravens (8/10) 43
—Roster cut to 53 (9/2) 66

The five best wide receivers the Redskins will face in 2017

We’ve looked at the best quarterbacks and the best running backs on the Redskins’ schedule. Now here are the five best wide receivers they will face as determined by 2016 receiving yards.

Odell Beckham, Giants, 1,367 yards in 2016—Josh Norman didn’t exactly shut him down in their two meetings as Beckham has 12 receptions for 165 yards. But Beckham didn’t score any touchdowns or have any other game-changing plays against the Redskins. Their first matchup this year comes under the lights at FedEx Field on Thanksgiving. Save room for popcorn after your Thanksgiving feast.  

Amari Cooper, Raiders, 1,153 yards—There was plenty of chatter that the Redskins wanted to draft Cooper when they have the fifth selection in 2015. But the Raiders snapped him up right before the Redskins picked. Cooper has been a steady and consistent target for Derek Carr. In fact, Carr should get Cooper a really, really nice Christmas present with some of the $125 million contract he just signed, a deal that Cooper helped him get.

Michael Thomas, Saints, 1,136 yards—Others sucked up all the rookie of the year conversation in 2016 but Thomas, a second-round pick out of Ohio State was very worthy of some accolades. To be sure, the Saints’ offense, led by perennial 5,000-yard passer Drew Brees, is very friendly to racking up a lot of receiving yards. With Brandin Cooks traded to the Patriots, look for Thomas to get even more opportunities in 2017.

Doug Baldwin, Seahawks, 1,128 yards—He is coming off career highs in receptions (94) and receiving yards (1,128). Baldwin has only played against the Redskins twice in the regular season and once in the playoffs and he hasn’t done much damage.

Demaryius Thomas, Broncos, 1,083 yards—You have to think that Thomas misses Peyton Manning already. In 2016, he had his worst production in five years. Still, he made his fifth straight Pro Bowl.

Pierre Garçon, 49ers, 1,041 yards—Adding a sixth here because, hey, we know this guy. He was the Redskins’ leading receiver three of the five seasons he was in Washington. I don’t think there is any reason he should want revenge. He was treated well and played well while in Washington. But certainly, he has a ton of professional pride and he will want to do well against his former team.

Best of the rest: Larry Fitzgerald led the NFL in receptions last year with 107 although he averaged only 9.6 yards per catch. Demaryius Thomas’ teammate Emmanuel Sanders also had over 1,000 yards receiving. So did Michael Crabtree, Cooper’s teammate in Oakland. I’m not a big fan of Alshon Jeffery but he instantly becomes the Eagles’ best receiver. Brandon Marshall also came into the division with the Giants. And don’t forget about Dez Bryant even though he appears to have taken a step back; he still is very dangerous.

In all, the Redskins will face nine receivers who gained over 1,000 yards last year.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Report: 'There isn't a real price that will make Kirk Cousins happy' with Redskins

Report: 'There isn't a real price that will make Kirk Cousins happy' with Redskins

Following a slew of reports that cast doubt on the Redskins reaching a long-term deal with Kirk Cousins, ESPN's Dianna Russini tweeted Tuesday that the impass is not about money. 

If the report is true, then Washington has run out of good options for retaining Cousins in the long term.

It's possible the team could use a third-straight franchise tag to keep him next season, but the price tag around $34 million would be astronomical for one season.

The transition tag would be worth in the neighborhood of $28 million. 

Russini doesn't elaborate on the reasons behind her report that Cousins wouldn't be happy in Washington regardless of price. But it's important to note that both teams and players have incentive to create leverage in contract negotiations through the media. 

The Redskins have until July 17 to reach a long-term deal with Cousins. 

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