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Loudoun board formalizes agreement with Redskins

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Loudoun board formalizes agreement with Redskins

The headlines two weeks ago said that the Redskins are moving their training camp to Richmond starting in 2013. But the lead was buried.The location of training camp only matters for about three weeks per year. For the next eight years at least, the Redskins will spend the other 11 months out of the year in Loudoun County, Virginia.On Tuesday, the Loudoun Board of Supervisors formalized the agreement that had been reached with the team earlier, one that will keep the Redskins in Loudoun.We are a proud business partner, said Mitch Gershman, the teams chief marketing officer. We look forward to staying in Loudoun for years to come.The county will pay the Redskins 2 million over four years starting in 2013. As part of the deal, Loudoun will be receiving a good amount of advertising and PR from the team including banner ads on the website, mentions in press releases, and placement on press conference backdrops at Redskins Park.The Virginia legislature was not entirely pleased with the states part of the deal, which pays the Redskins 4 million. That did not appear to be the case in Loudoun as nary a dissenting voice was heard.Im just delighted that you all are staying here in Loudoun, said Supervisor Suzanne Volpe.I just want to say to the critics that I think this is a good deal. I really do. And I think that the Redskins add value to our local economy, added Supervisor Ken Reid.The payments to the Redskins will come from hotel taxes. The Redskins estimate that the promotional services they will provide Loudoun will be worth 16 million over the eight years on the deal.

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Vernon Davis 'just can't fathom' the NFL's very strict celebration rules

Vernon Davis 'just can't fathom' the NFL's very strict celebration rules

As he proudly demonstrated in a 27-20 win against the Eagles last October, Vernon Davis has a silky jumpshot. Unfortunately, in today's NFL, celebrating by shooting a football like Davis did in the end zone that fall Sunday is prohibited.

The tight end, who was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct and eventually fined more than $12,000 for the move, didn't really get the point of the rule then, and he still doesn't understand it now. And as he told Kalyn Kahler of MMQB, he think it's time for the league to back off their strict stance on celebrations.

"I would just tell guys that when it comes to celebrations, anything is allowed, as long as it isn’t inappropriate," Davis said when asked how he'd change the celebration rules. "Anything that we know is wrong, we shouldn’t do. I think that is the key."

RELATED: THIS REDSKINS RULE PROPOSAL WOULD MAKE KICKOFFS MORE FUN

In Davis' case, he was penalized because of an odd technicality. The NFL doesn't want players using the ball as a prop — which No. 85 did on his jumper — but yet, they allow guys to spike and spin the ball without retribution. That gray area doesn't sit well with him.

"It doesn’t make sense to me at all," he said. "It should be really simple, we should know that we can’t use the ball as a prop for anything. So for them to allow spiking and not allow shooting, I just can’t fathom that."

The 33-year-old hopes that change is near, and he may get it, too, as the competition committee will reevaluate what is and isn't allowed at the upcoming league meetings. But if he and everyone else clamoring for less restrictions are rebuffed, Davis does have a workaround so that when he scores next, he won't get in trouble. 

"I shoot the shot, but without the ball," Davis said. "That’s my go-to now. As long as I don’t have the ball, I’m safe."

MORE REDSKINS: THE TEAM'S RECEIVING CORPS TOWERS OVER PAST GROUPS

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This Redskins rule proposal would make kickoffs more entertaining

This Redskins rule proposal would make kickoffs more entertaining

With his ability to limit opposing team's kickoff returners by consistently producing touchbacks, Dustin Hopkins is a solid weapon for the Redskins in the field position game. 

A rule that Washington is proposing to NFL owners at their upcoming meetings, however, suggests that the Redskins want Hopkins and other strong-legged kickers to become even more of an asset than they already are.

In addition, the rule would also breathe some much needed intrigue into kickoffs, which have been reduced to the second-best time to grab another beer behind a commercial break.

MORE REDSKINS: JEAN-FRANCOIS SIGNS WITH NFC CONTENDER

The proposal is this: If a kicker splits the uprights with his kickoff, then the other team's offense will take the field at the 20-yard line. As things stand now, any touchback — whether it's downed in the end zone, flies out of the back or sails through the middle of the goalposts — is brought out to the 25-yard marker.

A rule this funky isn't likely to pass on its first time through voting. In fact, who knows if it'll ever pass. 

But maybe, just maybe, one day it will, and guys such as Hopkins and Justin Tucker will become a bit more valuable than they are currently. So, if you're ever watching an NFL game and hear the words, "THE KICK IS GOOD!" on a kickoff, you'll know which team to thank.