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Limas Sweed

Limas Sweed

I'm guilty as charged.

Guilty of talking a good game when it comes to posts on the Redskins' draft but coming up very small when it comes to actual content.

I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

I could talk about how rough things have been at work, how we've had a constant stream of contractors moving through the house, how my unkempt yard has screamed out for attention as the weather has turned warmer and so on and so forth. And all of that would be true.

However, the main reason that I don't write much about the prospects out there is that I just don't know enough about them to write about them with any authority. I love college football but I don't get to watch nearly enough of it to see enough of the players to form a firm opinion of their potential as pros.

As you know, that doesn't stop many bloggers, media types, and message board posters from spewing out millions of words about fluid hips and shuttle times. You surely recognize that about 98% of them have barely the vaguest clue as to what they're talking about and they're just parroting what they read elsewhere.

That's not my style.

That doesn't mean, however, that I haven't formed some opinions about some players and what the Redskins should do. Last week I discussed the possibility of them trading this year's first round pick for someone's first next year plus a couple of other top 100 picks. Either a deal like that or a normal trade down, sliding down into, say, early in the second round and picking up more selections that way would be fine by me. This team needs an injection of youth and adding relatively high picks would be the best way to make that happen.

However the wheeling and dealing might shake out, if any takes place, there is a player who has caught my eye. He is Texas wide receiver Limas Sweed. Here is the case for him in video format.

What I like about him—and this is about as sophisticated as I'll get in an analysis—is that he passes the eyeball test. Limas Sweed looks like an NFL receiver. He's a man among boys at times playing in the Big 12, often going up and over a pair of hapless defenders to haul in a pass. At 6-5, 220 he has excellent size and his 4.5 time in the 40 demonstrates that he has more than adequate speed.

As there is with almost any player who will be available at pick #21, there is some downside with Sweed. The primary concern is a wrist injury that cost him most of his senior season for the Longhorns.

If he had shredded his ACL or broken an ankle I would be more concerned. There is every indication that the wrist will not be an issue going forward.

There are those who will tell you that Limas Sweed would be a reach at #21, that there is no way that he will be the best player on the board when the Redskins pick. There are others who think that he would be a good fit both in terms of the draft slot and in terms of the Redskins' needs.

There is only one player ranking list that matters, of course, and that is the one compiled by Vinny Cerrato and company. We don't know how they have Sweed rated. They could have him in their top 15; he might not even be in their top 30. On draft day they could be giving each other high fives as their pick approaches and he remains available or they could be completely disinterested in his status.

I don't know where the Redskins stand on him and that puts me in the company of billions of other people on the planet, including virtually all of the draftnicks out there. I do know that he'd look pretty good in burgundy and gold and I'll be rooting for that to happen next Saturday.

I'll leave you with a couple of Sweed highlight reels. To be sure, they're not the complete picture—I have yet to see a dropped pass in any of them—but they do give you a glimpse of what his upside could be.

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Matt Ryan throws some serious shade at Kyle Shanahan for the Super Bowl loss

Matt Ryan throws some serious shade at Kyle Shanahan for the Super Bowl loss

Matt Ryan spoke to CBS Sports' Pete Prisco about the loss to the Patriots in the Super Bowl and how the Falcons will rebound in 2017. 

In the process, he took a shot at former offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan's play-calling and put some of the blame on his style of coaching for the disastrous fourth quarter.

"Kyle's play calls -- he would take time to get stuff in," Ryan said. "As I was getting it, you're looking at the clock and you're talking 16 seconds before it cuts out. You don't have a lot of time to say, 'There's 16 seconds, no, no, no, we're not going to do that. Hey, guys, we're going to line up and run this.' You're talking about breaking the huddle at seven seconds if you do something along the lines.

"With the way Kyle's system was set up, he took more time to call plays and we shift and motion a lot more than we did with (former coordinator) Dirk (Koetter). You couldn't get out of stuff like that. We talk about being the most aggressive team in football. And I'm all for it. But there's also winning time. You're not being aggressive not running it there."

Those are some harsh words from Ryan and not exactly a ringing endorsement of Kyle Shanahan. This loss will surely haunt him should he never get back to another Super Bowl.

"There's always going to be a little sting," Ryan said. "You never lose that. Hopefully we've got four Super Bowl victories after this one, but that doesn't mean we won't still be like, 'Damn, let's talk about the other one we should've had."

Redskins fans may be able to relate to Matt Ryan's pain as some were vocal about Kyle Shanahan's play-calling during his time in Washington. Maybe Kirk Cousins takes notice of Ryan's comments as well before he considers San Francisco next off-season.

MORE REDSKINS: REDSKINS STATEMENT WAS A MISTAKE, BUT WON'T HAVE IMPACT ON THE FIELD

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Over/under: Redskins running backs in 2017

Over/under: Redskins running backs in 2017

Redskins running backs over-under

The Redskins’ running backs depth chart looks quite different from how it did a year ago. Rob Kelley, who was “ninth-string” back last year per Jay Gruden, is the starter. Samaje Perine enters the mix with expectations that exceed those normally assigned to a fourth-round pick. Chris Thompson is the constant as the third-down back. What kind of numbers will they put up this year? Redskins Insiders Rich Tandler and JP Finlay go over-under on some Redskins running back stats. 

Rob Kelley, 1,000 rushing yards

Tandler: If you project Kelley’s production in the nine games he started over 16 games it comes to about 1,050 yards. He had his ups and downs in those nine starts and he will have them this year. But he should have enough ups to be able to average the 62.5 yards per game needed to hit the thousand-yard mark. Over

Finlay: Unlike wide receivers, where 25 guys broke the 1,000 yard mark in 2016, it's getting harder and harder for a running back to hit four-figures. In 2016, only 12 RBs ran for more than 1,000 yards, and only eight got over 1,100 yards. As the NFL becomes more and more of a passing league, less backs are getting the carries sufficient for a 1,000 yard season. The Redskins haven't had a 1,000 yard rusher since Alfred Morris in 2014. While I think Kelley gets the bulk of the yardage, I think it caps out about 900 yards and Chris Thompson and Samaje Perine creep into the total. Under

RELATED: Who's next at QB for the Redskins?

Kelley, 10 rushing touchdowns

Tandler: He scored six as the starter last year and doing the math that comes to 11 over 16 games. But last year there wasn’t a player like Perine, who could come into the game and vulture some touchdowns after Kelley did the work to get the ball in goal to go position. Under

Finlay: Sorry to keep going back to stats, but last year only seven running backs got to 10 TDs or more. Only seven! Hard to see Kelley getting there on a team that didn't run all that much, or all that well either, in 2016. Under

Samaje Perine, 500 rushing yards

Tandler: It tough to set a line for a guy who hasn’t played. I’ll go off Matt Jones’ 2015 rookie season when he gained 490 yards while sharing time with Alfred Morris. If Perine averages four yards per carry, which is not hard to do, he’ll need about eight carries per game to get to 500. It’s close but if Kelley is effective, as I believe he will be, Perine might not get enough carries to have a chance. Under

Finlay: Tandler's Matt Jones comp pretty much works for Perine, but Jones had explosive speed that Perine doesn't have. A better comp for me was Derrick Henry last year as a rookie with the Titans. DeMarco Murray was established as the top dog, and Henry worked for a productive 490 yards. Under

MORE REDSKINS: Offer to Cousins not nearly enough

Chris Thompson, 60 pass receptions

Tandler: His role is beyond just third down. If the Redskins are behind in the fourth quarter, Thompson is usually in there to try to help spark a rally. Along with TE Jordan Reed and WR Jamison Crowder, Thompson will benefit from Kirk Cousins’ familiarity with him. Over

Finlay: Thompson should be a strong contributor in 2017, but 60 catches is a lot for a running back. Only David Johnson (80) and Le'Veon Bell (75) went over that number in 2016, while James White had exactly 60 catches. Thompson grabbed 49 balls in 2016, an impressive total. I could actually see Thompson getting a bigger percentage increase in carries, he had 68 rushes last season with a very solid 5.2 YPC, than catches. Under

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