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Indisputable Visual Evidence II

Indisputable Visual Evidence II

Indisputable Visual Evidence II

No, this is not another 1,000 words about yet another close call at the goal line that went against the Redskins. It did indeed seem unlikely that Lamont Jordan’s knee would be able to find the ground in the midst of pile of bodies that he was on top of. I mean, last week you have Alstott on a pile of bodies and he’s not down and this week Jordan is on the pile and he is down. And it would have been a bit easier to swallow if we had seen a zebra running in and emphatically jabbing his index finger towards the ground in the universal “down by contact” gesture. It was like last week when the head linesman trotted in from the sideline, looked around, hesitated a count, and then raised his arms to signal that the conversion was good. Be emphatic and sell the call, ref.

There is no diatribe here for two reasons. First, unlike last week, there is no indisputable visual evidence that the call on the field, weak and hesitant as it was, was incorrect. It looked like a fumble, but his knee could have touched the ground; you just can’t see through the pile. Second and most important, again unlike last week, the view here is that the Redskins would have lost this game even if the call had gone in their favor.

They would have had the ball inside their own one with about 2:20 left. They had done zip offensively in the second half. The Raiders had two timeouts and the two-minute warning to work with. Assuming a three and out for the Redskins, Oakland would have had at least a minute and a half and good field position to give Janakowski a shot. Even if it had gone into overtime there is little reason to believe that they would have been able to move the ball and/or stop the Raiders from doing so.

There really isn’t any point in writing a thousand words about this game anyway because it can be summed up in one word—turnovers. Despite the lack of offensive continuity, despite the lack of a pass rush, despite the injuries, the Redskins still win if they don’t cough the ball up. Two fumbles by Clinton Portis, who has been positively glue-fingered all year, cost the Redskins six points. His first gave the Raiders the ball at the Redskins 15 and led to the Raiders’ first points of the day on a field goal. In the third quarter, Portis’ second fumble at the Oakland 29 cost them a shot at a field goal. Do the math, that’s a net loss of six points in a three-point game.

And here’s one more number: 2:39. That’s the Redskins’ time of possession in the fourth quarter of a close game. The possession times in their three “drives” in the fourth quarter were 29 seconds, 39 seconds, and 63 seconds (for those of you doing the math, another drive died after first 25 seconds of the fourth). That’s not going to get it done.

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Redskins and Morgan Moses agree to five-year extension

Redskins and Morgan Moses agree to five-year extension

The Redskins have signed one of their own to a contract extension.

According to multiple reports, the team has reached agreement with right tackle Morgan Moses on a five-year contract extension. The deal will make him the second-highest paid right tackle in the NFL.

RELATED: Final NFL Mock Draft

Moses was entering the final year of his rookie contract. Absent an extension he was slated to become a free agent in 2018.

Moses, who just turned 26, was a third-round pick of the Redskins in 2014. He played sparingly as a rookie, appearing in eight games and starting one. In training camp in 2015 he was installed as the starter at right tackle and he has started all 32 games since then.

The highest-paid right tackle in the game is Lane Johnson of the Eagles. His contract averages $11.25 million per year. Second on the list is Ricky Wagner of the Lions whose deal has an average annual value of $9.5 million per year. So look for Moses’ deal to come in somewhere in the $10 million per year range.

MORE REDSKINS: Final Redskins mock: Defense goes 1-2, surprise in the third 

Of course, the details and fully guaranteed money are the most important aspects. Those will be reported in the coming days.

Moses’ extension means that the Redskins now have both of their offensive tackles under contract through at least the 2020 season. Left tackle Trent Williams signed a five-year, $66 million contract extension in 2015.

The extension was first reported by ESPN.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Will McCloughan advising other teams hurt the Redskins in the draft?

Will McCloughan advising other teams hurt the Redskins in the draft?

Redskins’ college scouting director Scott Campbell acknowledged earlier this week that the team’s draft board will have Scot McCloughan’s influence on it. The Redskins may not be alone in having a McCloughan imprint on their draft tonight.

According to Mike Garofolo of NFL Media, the former Redskins GM has resumed the scouting service that he ran prior to being hired by the Redskins in January of 2015. He supplied his evaluation of various draft prospects to teams who paid for his service.

RELATED: Final NFL Mock Draft

Team president Bruce Allen has let it be known since they fired McCloughan in early March he was free to do work for other teams. And apparently, McCloughan is doing just that, providing his evaluations to teams that the Redskins are trying to outsmart in the draft.

The report did not specify to which teams McCloughan has been providing reports. However, Garafolo did say that McCloughan is “not giving up” information about the Redskins’ strategy. Of course, that’s a very gray area. If McCloughan tells a team that he gives Player X a third-round grade that team can reasonably guess that the Redskins have a similar grade on him. Teams are hungry for any tidbits about what other teams are thinking and they can put such nuggets to good use, especially if they are considering a trade.

MORE REDSKINS: Final Redskins mock: Defense goes 1-2, surprise in the third 

However, it’s possible that the Redskins’ board has changed enough to make whatever information McCloughan might be leaking out so outdated as to be of very limited use. Had the Redskins really been highly concerned about what McCloughan might say to other teams they either would have kept him on the job or they could have continued to pay him through the end of the draft and prohibit him from working anywhere else until after the final pick is made on Saturday evening.

If it’s not anything else it’s a reminder that the guy the Redskins let go a month and a half before the draft is so good at evaluating draft talent that other teams are willing to pay for him to provide them with those evaluations even this late in the process. This may not be an issue for them in this draft but it could be a problem as they try to grow a winning program through the draft in the coming years.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.