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How safe will RG3 play it?

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How safe will RG3 play it?

What: Vikings (4-1) vs. Redskins (2-3)
Where: FedEx Field, Landover, Md.
When: Sunday, 4:25 p.m.
TV: Fox WTTG-5
Redskins Kickoff and Postgame Live: Comcast SportsNet 3 and 7

The big question this week is whether Robert Griffin III will be cleared by doctors to play after leaving last week’s game with the first concussion of his NFL career.

But the bigger question is this: Did the rookie quarterback – and face of the Redskins – learn a valuable lesson about avoiding similarly perilous situations in the future?

What’s going to happen the next time Griffin is flushed from the pocket and he has a hulking linebacker bearing down on him?

Will he slide or slink out of bounds?

Will he toss the ball into the stands? 

Or will he again put ego before team, attempt to add another highlight to his vast collection and leave himself vulnerable to a season-or career-altering blow?

What’s ironic about the hit, it came on an afternoon in which Griffin was not a significant part of the ground attack. In fact, Griffin’s rushing attempts have plummeted each the past three weeks, from a season-high 13 against the Bengals to eight vs. the Buccaneers to just one against the Falcons.

Since returning to practice on Wednesday, Griffin has said all of the right things. If he’s given the go-ahead by an independent neurologist to suit up against the Vikings, we’ll find out if he meant it.

“If you have to live to play another down,” he said, “you live to play another down.”

Redskins’ fans had better hope Griffin’s 180-degree turnabout from the bravado he expressed earlier this season wasn’t just lip service. The entire offense is predicated on Griffin lining up behind the center and, as last week’s loss emphasized, rookie backup Kirk Cousins is not ready to be a starter in the NFL. (Cousins threw a touchdown, but he also tossed two interceptions – double Griffin’s total – in only 13 snaps.)

“It’s about being smart,” Griffin said of punishing hit he absorbed. “It’s a learning experience for me.”

Griffin has adjusted to the speed and complexity of professional defenses faster than most anticipated. And, as a direct result, he’s ascended from Heisman Trophy winner to NFL star quicker than expected as well. But how long will it take for him to embrace the self-preservation tactics all successful dual-threat quarterbacks eventually learn?

Right now, it’s arguably the most important question facing the franchise. 

Here are three other areas the team at www.csnwashington will be monitoring:

1) Running back Adrian Peterson is the biggest star on Minnesota’s roster. Wide receiver Percy Harvin, however, might be the Viking’s most dangerous -- and the league’s most versatile -- weapon.

Harvin can line up in the slot, split wide, in the backfield and as a kick returner. He’s racked up 407 receiving yards, of which a league-leading 329 have come after the catch, according to STATS Inc.

The Redskins defense, meantime, ranks second to last in passing yards against (329 per game) and last in passing touchdowns allowed (13).

In last week’s 30-7 victory over the Titans, Harvin lined up as a running back and took an inside handoff from Christian Ponder and powered his way into the end zone from four yards out. Two quarters later, Harvin lined up in the slot, eluded two would-be tacklers and turned a routine bubble screen into a dazzling 10-yard touchdown.

“They find different ways to utilize his talent,” safety Madieu Williams said. “You always have to be aware of where No. 12 is.”

2) The Redskins will turn to their third kicker in two seasons against the Vikings after releasing the struggling Billy Cundiff on Tuesday and signing the talented but untested Kai Forbath.

Forbath was named college football’s top kicker in 2009 and the 25-year-old possesses a strong leg. But he’s never kicked a field goal in a regular season NFL game and did not kickoff during his four years at UCLA. 

Adding to the challenge Forbath faces: he’s had only five days to develop a rhythm with long snapper Justin Snow and holder Sav Rocca.

“We need him to make field goals for us,” special teams captain Lorenzo Alexander said. “We’re not a good enough team to miss opportunities to put points on the board.”

Cundiff missed five of his 12 attempts.

3) Is this the week the Redskins snap their losing streak at home? It’s reached an epic eight consecutive games and is the longest such drought in the NFL, dating back to Sept. 18, 2011.

Six of those defeats, however, have come by seven points or fewer, including last December’s 33-26 loss to the Vikings.

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Vernon Davis 'just can't fathom' the NFL's very strict celebration rules

Vernon Davis 'just can't fathom' the NFL's very strict celebration rules

As he proudly demonstrated in a 27-20 win against the Eagles last October, Vernon Davis has a silky jumpshot. Unfortunately, in today's NFL, celebrating by shooting a football like Davis did in the end zone that fall Sunday is prohibited.

The tight end, who was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct and eventually fined more than $12,000 for the move, didn't really get the point of the rule then, and he still doesn't understand it now. And as he told Kalyn Kahler of MMQB, he think it's time for the league to back off their strict stance on celebrations.

"I would just tell guys that when it comes to celebrations, anything is allowed, as long as it isn’t inappropriate," Davis said when asked how he'd change the celebration rules. "Anything that we know is wrong, we shouldn’t do. I think that is the key."

RELATED: THIS REDSKINS RULE PROPOSAL WOULD MAKE KICKOFFS MORE FUN

In Davis' case, he was penalized because of an odd technicality. The NFL doesn't want players using the ball as a prop — which No. 85 did on his jumper — but yet, they allow guys to spike and spin the ball without retribution. That gray area doesn't sit well with him.

"It doesn’t make sense to me at all," he said. "It should be really simple, we should know that we can’t use the ball as a prop for anything. So for them to allow spiking and not allow shooting, I just can’t fathom that."

The 33-year-old hopes that change is near, and he may get it, too, as the competition committee will reevaluate what is and isn't allowed at the upcoming league meetings. But if he and everyone else clamoring for less restrictions are rebuffed, Davis does have a workaround so that when he scores next, he won't get in trouble. 

"I shoot the shot, but without the ball," Davis said. "That’s my go-to now. As long as I don’t have the ball, I’m safe."

MORE REDSKINS: THE TEAM'S RECEIVING CORPS TOWERS OVER PAST GROUPS

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This Redskins rule proposal would make kickoffs more entertaining

This Redskins rule proposal would make kickoffs more entertaining

With his ability to limit opposing team's kickoff returners by consistently producing touchbacks, Dustin Hopkins is a solid weapon for the Redskins in the field position game. 

A rule that Washington is proposing to NFL owners at their upcoming meetings, however, suggests that the Redskins want Hopkins and other strong-legged kickers to become even more of an asset than they already are.

In addition, the rule would also breathe some much needed intrigue into kickoffs, which have been reduced to the second-best time to grab another beer behind a commercial break.

MORE REDSKINS: JEAN-FRANCOIS SIGNS WITH NFC CONTENDER

The proposal is this: If a kicker splits the uprights with his kickoff, then the other team's offense will take the field at the 20-yard line. As things stand now, any touchback — whether it's downed in the end zone, flies out of the back or sails through the middle of the goalposts — is brought out to the 25-yard marker.

A rule this funky isn't likely to pass on its first time through voting. In fact, who knows if it'll ever pass. 

But maybe, just maybe, one day it will, and guys such as Hopkins and Justin Tucker will become a bit more valuable than they are currently. So, if you're ever watching an NFL game and hear the words, "THE KICK IS GOOD!" on a kickoff, you'll know which team to thank.