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Grading the Washington Redskins draft

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Grading the Washington Redskins draft

Since we don’t know how the careers of the players picked by the Redskins yesterday will turn out we have to dig in a little more to come up with a grade. Here's my assessment, feel free to leave yours in the comments.

Strategy—C+

They came in with the handicap of not having a first-round pick, with that selection going to the Rams as the final payment in the deal to land the rights to Robert Griffin III. There is no way at the time that they thought the pick would be the second overall but it was what it was. We won’t know for a while if the trade will prove to be a good deal but in the short term the fact that the Redskins do have a quarterback in place obviated the need for Redskins Nation to spend the last four months debating the relative merits of Johnny Football and Blake Bortles was a positive.

Because of that deal the Redskins went in with six picks; they ended up with eight. They picked up an additional third by moving back in the second round from the 34th overall pick to the 47th. That deal was with the Cowboys and the Redskins did quite well in the deal. Looking at the draft value chart, such a move back should have netted Washington Dallas’ fourth-round pick. But they were able to take advantage of the Cowboys’ desperation for a pass rusher and they extracted a third-rounder from their division rivals.

A few players the Redskins could have used did go off of the board in between their original pick and the one they traded for. In particular, offensive tackle Joel Bitonio and defensive lineman Stephon Tuitt were players many had connected to the Redskins. It seemed that Washington liked the guy they ended up getting, outside linebacker Trent Murphy. Some saw that pick as a reach but not a crazy one. They took guard Spencer long with the additional third-rounder from the deal.

Late Saturday afternoon they pulled off a similar deal on a smaller scale, dealing with the Titans to move back eight spots in the sixth round, collecting Tennessee’s seventh-round pick in the process. They likely got the same player with the 186th pick as they would have with the 178th, running back Lache Seastrunk of Baylor.

You can debate how wisely the Redskins used that extra seventh as they took a kicker, Zach Hocker of Arkansas. Some say it’s dumb to ever draft a kicker, especially when you have a pretty good one in Kai Forbath. I disagree on the first part, if you like a kicker, take him rather than scramble through the chaotic undrafted free agent process. I do agree that Forbath is a quality kicker and that burning a draft pick to challenge him is not good strategy.

Many thought that the Redskins should have taken a safety somewhere along the line given that Brandon Meriweather and Ryan Clark are both on the wrong side of 30. Gruden said that they didn’t have the chance to take one who they thought could make the roster. It was generally thought that this was a very weak draft at the position and Gruden’s explanation is quite plausible. Still, it could come back to burn them if Bacarri Rambo and/or Phillip Thomas, the two safeties they drafted last year, can’t develop into starters or at least solid reserves.

Talent/Fit—B

Morgan Moses is the best fit on the Redskins’ board. The team clearly wants to move on from right tackle Tyler Polumbus at some point. Moses is a good candidate to unseat him, perhaps sooner rather than later.

Some question the Murphy fit but those people need to look at Brian Orakpo’s contract. He’s a free agent after this year and the Redskins will have to decide if they want to sign him, franchise him, or let him leave. The first two options will be expensive and the team will have more leverage if they have a replacement for Orakpo on the roster. For this year, Murphy will play a few hundred snaps on defense in addition to being a full special teams contributor.

Spencer Long, the Redskins’ third-round pick, will be a good fit if, as some believe, he can become the team’s starting center. Ryan Grant will have to work to overcome his shortcomings (mainly pedestrian speed) to become a productive receiver. Bashaud Breeland and Lache Seastrunk both left college a year early and could become assets if they mature. Seventh-round tight end Ted Bolser will have to justify the team carrying four tight ends.

Overall—B-

In the lead up to the draft, the Redskins let it be known that they were looking for hard-working, hungry, overachieving players who love playing the game more than they love what the game can get for them. And an ability to play special teams was a major resume enhancer as well.

The players they picked fit the criteria. Not all of them precisely fit, of course, but well enough to where you can say that the draft class has a reasonable chance of developing into a successful group.

In particular, scouting reports on Murphy and Long noted a “first on the field for practice, last one off” mentality. And Murphy, Grant, Breeland, and Bolser played special teams in college and spoke as though they expect to do the same thing in Washington.

They keys to this draft could end up being Breeland and Seastrunk. Breeland could be a starting corner in a year or two if he develops. If Seastrunk can learn to catch out of the backfield his home-run ability could make him a great asset.

If those two and, say, two of the top three picks pan out, this would be quite a successful draft. Anything else would be gravy.

But that’s easier said than done. This franchise has not done a very good job of developing mid- and late-round picks into starters or even key reserves. Bruce Allen noted this failure in last week’s press conference and said that the solution was to focus on high effort players with the belief that they will put in what it takes to grow as a player.

Will it work? We will have to wait and see. For now, we can give Allen and the organization some credit for recognizing the problem, having a plan to fix it, and sticking to that plan.

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Redskins' Doug Williams presents a special jersey to family of Jim Vance

Redskins' Doug Williams presents a special jersey to family of Jim Vance

On July 22, legendary D.C. broadcaster Jim Vance died at the age of 75.

During the first day of training camp on Thursday, Washington Redskins VP of player personnel Doug Williams, presented NBC4 sports reporter Carol Maloney with a gift for Vance's family.

RELATED: REMEMBERING JIM VANCE

The gesture by the Redskins was one filled with much respect for the award-winning anchor.

Vance was a staple for many D.C. locals, being a full-time anchor since 1972 for NBC4. 

Last summer, Vance revealed he had been diagnosed with cancer but never stopped working. 

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LIVE Redskins training camp practice report: Day 1

LIVE Redskins training camp practice report: Day 1

RICHMOND—The Redskins took the field for their first practice of the season. Jordan Reed is missing as was the usual stifling heat at the Bon Secours training center.It's warm but the humidity is down from the normal late-July sauna here. 

Here are my observations from practice as it unfolds. Come back and refresh often for the latest:

—Jamison Crowder still appears to be the No. 1 punt returner. Also fielding kicks off of the leg of Tress Way were Maurice Harris, Chris Thompson, and Will Blackmon. 

—The Redskins are practicing without pads per collective bargaining rules. A few are wearing shells. 

—New tight end EJ Bibbs just introduced himself to Vernon Davis as they were getting ready for some individual drills. Reminds me of a few year ago when a just acquired player was participating in stretching and they brought his contract out onto the field for him to sign. He wouldn’t have been able to practice otherwise. 

—Kirk Cousins just acknowledged a fan lined up near the sideline. ‘How’s it going, Derrick?” Derrick’s friends were properly impressed. 

—Maurice Harris showed good form in catching a Cousins pass over the middle against no defense. Nothing spectacular but but a good job reaching forward to pull in a pass that was ahead of him. 

—Harris with another nice catch, this time guarded over the middle by Will Blackmon. He is off to a good start in competing for playing time.

—Torian Gray is admonishing his defensive backs to “wake up, wake up.” On one rep he wanted Tevin Homer to “drive to the ball.”

—It looked like Josh Doctson had a step on Bashaud Breeland on a deep pass but the CB recovered and knocked the pass away. 

—A few plays later Doctson got deep again, this time against Quinton Dunbar. This time the CB couldn’t catch up and Doctson hauled in the pass.

—In the early going in 11 on 11, Will Compton and Mason Foster are the inside LBs with the first team and Joey Mbu is at nose tackle. Both situations could change over the course of the next few weeks. 

—Nice cut by Keith Marshall on a run around right end. He planted his foot and cut upfield with some serious burst. He’s a dark horse when it comes to making the roster but I’m keeping an eye on him. 

—Cousins with a dart to Terrelle Pryor along the sideline. A sharp and accurate throw. 

—Rain is approaching but it should hold off until practice is over. Meanwhile, the clouds and breeze are cooling things down. Nobody is complaining.  

—Pryor was assigned to block Josh Norman on a running play. Norman made a business decision not to contest the block and there was light contact as Norman backed down the field.

—Rookie Robert Davis made a solid back-shoulder catch on the sideline. I’m not sure if Colt McCoy intended for the pass to be back shoulder but that was where it went and Davis reached to make the grab. 

—What was that? Nate Sudfeld heaved one downfield to nobody in particular. Kendall Fuller got an easy interception, his second of the day. 

—That is from Richmond for today. Come on back tomorrow, we’ll do it again.