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GameBlog: Third Quarter

GameBlog: Third Quarter

Third Quarter

Washington is a homecoming opponent again. Denver is installing two guys into its Hall of Fame or whatever they call it. I’m sure they were expecting an easy win. I trust that Gibbs and company pointed this out to the team.

Three consecutive three and outs for the Broncos. Nothing is working for them except for the fact that the Redskins can’t get a turnover out of Plummer’s shaky play. I’d like to say that it will happen sooner or later but the Redskins’ track record doesn’t give one much confidence in that statement.

I was just corrected, that was four straight three and outs. A fifth here, deep in Denver territory, would be most helpful.

I’ve got to think that the tuck rule will be invoked here. That was a textbook example. Heck, if I’m the Redskins I might challenge the call if Denver doesn’t. I’d rather have them punting with a rush from the end zone than getting a free kick from the 20.

If it’s a safety, I wonder if it counts as a three and out.

Denver is now out of challenges, although their second one was successful. Let’s see, can I spell pyric victory without spell check? Nope.

Those third-down conversions aren’t coming as easily this week as they were last week against Seattle. That was not a good sequence for the Redskins as they gave up field position in addition to not scoring points. You have to do one or the other.

You can’t hold ‘em down forever. It looked like a give-up almost, not wanting to let Plummer put it up in the air. But just like on the other, fourth-down run he got through the blitz and there was nobody there. Hopefully, this will wake up the Redskins’ offense. Plenty of time left.

Again, no field position advantage gained by the Redskins due to the intentional grounding and the poor punt by Frost. The Redskins may pay again.

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One stat that should make DeSean Jackson very dangerous against Eagles

One stat that should make DeSean Jackson very dangerous against Eagles

The Eagles defense is on a big-play streak, but not one that defensive coordinators will like very much, and it could be very good news for the Redskins and DeSean Jackson. 

At this stage of his career, Jackson is a well-known deep threat. While much of the 2016 season has been disappointing for Jackson, in back-to-back weeks, the vertical passing attack has worked. In Arizona last Sunday, Jackson only caught one pass, but it went for 59 yards. On Thanksgiving in Dallas, Jackson hauled in a 67-yard touchdown pass from Kirk Cousins as part of his season-high 118 receiving yards.

"What he brings to this football team, he brings something that not a lot of people can bring, and that’s obviously the speed and the big play ability," 'Skins head coach Jay Gruden said of Jackson.

The last two games moved Jackson's yards-per-catch average back in normal range with the rest of his career at 16.5. Halfway through this season, Jackson was averaging below 14 YPC, which would have been by far the worst of his career.

"A lot of people think that we haven’t utilized his speed quite like we should, but I think he has had a major impact on this football team," Gruden said. "His deep threat has an impact on the defense. It opens up areas for Jordan Reed and Jamison Crowder and the backs sometimes. He’s been a major influence for this football team in a good way."

Beyond just the big plays, the Eagles defense has given up 645 passing yards in their last two games. Cousins has historically played well in Philadelphia, and should be in good position to do the same this weekend.

And based on the Eagles' past six games, expect Jackson to have another big game at Lincoln Financial Field. 

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