Quick Links

Don't expect Redskins to offer top QB market price to Kirk Cousins, analyst says

Don't expect Redskins to offer top QB market price to Kirk Cousins, analyst says

Negotiations between the Redskins and Kirk Cousins broke down last year as the two sides were far apart on money. Washington offered as much as $16 million per year in a long-term deal, but the Cousins' camp rebuffed those offers before the organization placed the franchise tag on their quarterback for the 2016 season.

With the countdown on for the team to decide to use the franchise tag for the 2017 season before the March 1 deadline, the 'Skins must again decide what they are willing to offer Cousins in a multi-year contract. ESPN's Andrew Brandt, speaking with ESPN980's Kevin Sheehan on Thursday morning, explained that Washington brass is not expected to go to the top of the quarterback market.

"The Redskins are in a position of strength on the long-term aspect," Brandt said. "A long-term deal can happen if Kirk Cousins' camp is willing to not negotiate on the level of the franchise tag number. That did not happen last year."

Last year that meant the Cousins camp wanted the deal to start at $20 million per season, the amount guaranteed by the franchise tag. This year, that number jumps to $24 million. 

Many have used the Andrew Luck contract, and it's $87 million guaranteed, signed last year as a barometer for what Cousins should make, regardless if the Washington passer is as good as the Colts QB. Brandt disagreed.

"They don’t have to be a slave to the Andrew Luck deal," he said.

Brandt made clear he doesn't expect the Redskins to "negotiate with the top of the market" and that if the Cousins camp demands to be paid at that level, expect another contract impasse. 

Last year's negotiations followed a similar pattern, in that the team and the player were miles away from a compromise when it came to annual salary and guaranteed money. Redskins' decision makers have already showed they are willing to use the tag, and in 2017, it again seems like a viable option. 

Cousins spoke earlier this year about his desire to be paid at the top of his worth, both for his own contract and for quarterbacks down the road. Interestingly, Brandt didn't believe the market for Cousins quite matches the "hysteria" suggested by fans and some media.

"Much more hyped than the reality will show," he said. "I don’t think somebody's going to put together this massive Kirk Cousins' contract."

<<<LOOKING AT REDSKINS DRAFT PROSPECTS>>>

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

Quick Links

After 4 teams in 5 seasons, D.J. Swearinger knows what it takes to make the Redskins home

After 4 teams in 5 seasons, D.J. Swearinger knows what it takes to make the Redskins home

It's never been a talent issue for D.J. Swearinger. In college he made big plays and earned all conference honors playing in the SEC at South Carolina. He was drafted high by Houston, second round in 2013, and started 10 games his rookie season. 

In his first two seasons with the Texans, Swearinger started 22 games and proved to be a playmaker. He logged three interceptions and more than 100 tackles. He looked like a possible long-term answer at safety, until he was uncermoniously cut after his second year.

Reports showed Swearinger bucked at playing special teams. And over time, a reputation as a big - sometimes dirty - hitter emerged. 

None of it helped Swearinger, who was signed by Tampa in 2015. He played seven games for the Bucs but was cut mid-season. Arizona signed him late in the 2015 season, and kept him for 2016.

Last year, playing on a defense with strong leaders like Calais Campbell and Patrick Peterson, Swearinger excelled. He played all over the Cardinals secondary, starting 12 games and making plays like he did early in his career in Houston.

He finished the 2016 season with three interceptions, two sacks and eight passes defensed. He made more than 50 tackles. Pro Football Focus rated Swearinger with a +15.3 grade, by far the highest of his career and good for the 8th best rating of any safety in the NFL.

The Redskins haven't had solid safety play in years. In 2016, the team tried to address the position on the cheap, converting cornerbacks to safeties and signing low tier free agents. It didn't work.

So, finally, in 2017 the Redskins front office addressed the safety position by signing Swearinger to a three-year deal. And it sounds like the 25-year-old has grown up a lot after five years of bouncing around the league.

"I've been on a lot of teams. I want to make this home," Swearinger said (full video above). "I feel like I’m experienced enough to know what to do as a pro, know what to do to stay on top of things and be a pro. As long as I be a pro every day and make the plays I’m capable of, I’ll be a Redskin."

Swearinger's deal will keep him with the Redskins through the 2019 season, but already, head coach Jay Gruden seems excited about the new safety. Earlier this offseason, Gruden said watching film of Swearinger revealed a player hitting the highest levels of safety play in the NFL. In OTAs, seeing Swearinger in person, Gruden was impressed.

"Watching him the first two days really excites me. He just looks like a safety back there," Gruden said. "No offense to the previous safeties we’ve had before, but I just think D.J. is to a level in his career right now where he’s got a lot of confidence. He has got a lot of talent."

There was some question if Swearinger can play the free safety role in Washington. More to the point, if he has the speed to play a true center field, with second-year man Su'a Cravens moving from linebacker to strong safety. Swearinger has zero concerns.

"I'm a free safety, I think that fits my body well," he said. "As a free safety you got to have the confidence in yourself that you can run with those guys and make plays on those guys."

Swearinger doesn't lack for confidence, and he shouldn't. Combined with Cravens, along with Josh Norman and Bashaud Breeland at cornerback, the Redskins secondary could be a strength in 2017.

"We have a lot of talent. If we work day in and day out, I think this group can be one of the best," Swearinger said. "We just got to keep working, keep gelling to get everybody on the same page, the sky’s the limit."

It's normal for players to be excited in May. There supposed to be. 

Coaches, however, tend to be more hesitant with praise. Not optimism, but actual praise, though when it comes to Swearinger, Gruden isn't shy about his expectations.

"We know that he’s a physical guy, but as far as coverages and breaking up things, he’s got a lot of confidence and I think he’s going to really, really emerge as a top safety not only for this team but in this league," the coach said of his new free safety.

It's been a long journey for Swearinger, four teams in five season. He's hoping this one sticks. 

<<<NFL POWER RANKINGS: WHO GOT BETTER AFTER THE DRAFT>>>

Want more Redskins? Click here to follow JP on Facebook and check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates via Twitter! Click here for the #RedskinsTalk on Apple Podcasts, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

ROSTER BATTLES: Left guard | Tight end Nickel cornerback  | Inside linebacker | Running back

Quick Links

The Redskins' challenge: Get their big receivers to play big

The Redskins' challenge: Get their big receivers to play big

It is not news to anyone reading this that the Redskins wide receiver corps is bigger than it was last year. The challenge now is for the offense to get better, particularly in the red zone.

The additions to the wide receiver corps that stand out are free agent Terrelle Pryor, 6-4, and 2016 first-round pick Josh Doctson, 6-2, replacing the 6-0 Pierre Garçon and DeSean Jackson, who was generously listed at 5-10, as the starters on the outside.

It’s not just a matter of quarterback Kirk Cousins aiming his passes a little higher. Bigger receivers present a different target.

RELATED: Who are the Redskins' roster locks?

“I’m bigger and my body movement is different than some guys he played with,” Pryor said on Wednesday following his second OTA practice with Cousins. “He played with some guys that are six-foot, 5-11. I think the movement and how I run, it doesn’t look like I’m really flying but I’m flying. Different things like that he needs to feel out and he will.”

Last year, the Redskins tried to run some fade patters in the red zone, often to some of their shorter receivers. It worked on occasion but it failed often enough for it to become a running joke among fans. But with the bigger wide receiver group coach Jay Gruden could be doubling down on the fade in 2017. It sure sounds like Cousins will be working on it a lot.

“There are certain throws down the field that we have to get adjusted to—some of the back-shoulder fades, the opportunity balls that Terrelle really makes look easy that are harder to throw if you haven’t thrown them before,” said Gruden. “That’s an adjustment period we’ll have to go through. We’ll keep pushing the envelope out here at practice and try to get good at everything. Terrelle is a different target and gives us some different options down the field, but we do have to get him squared away on some of the fundamental route concepts that we have.”

MORE REDSKINS: OTA practice observations 

Throwing to the smaller group of receivers, Cousins has completed 68.3 percent of his passes. He is looking forward to throwing to the big guys.

“I think it’s an advantage in the sense that you have a larger catch radius,” said Cousins. “When a guy is quote-unquote covered, hopefully he is still open because you can throw him to a spot where maybe the defensive back can’t quite make a play. It is a little new for me, haven’t had a ton of experience making throws like that, so it is one of the many things we will emphasize, work on and try to get a better feel for as we go through the offseason program. And as a quarterback it is exciting because we think that adds another wrinkle or element to our offense that hopefully can make us better and help us take a step forward.”

There is one thing to keep in mind as the Redskins move forward with their new receiving corps. There are smaller receivers who play big. Pryor likes how his new teammate, the 5-9 Jamison Crowder, plays.

“I look at Crowder and he plays like he’s 6-5,” said Pryor. “You want guys like that, guys who play like they’re huge.”

And that’s the thing. The Redskins have had one of the best passing attacks in the NFL for the past couple of years with smaller receivers who often came up big. It will take the bigger players playing up to their size for the Redskins to continue to be productive through the air. And that will take a lot of work.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.