Quick Links

Coles is developing a pattern

Coles is developing a pattern

A Sports Illustrated article by Jeffri Chadiha dealing with the Coles issue warrants some scrutiny here:

It all will be over soon for Laveranues Coles.

Once he passes a routine physical Wednesday, his trade from the Washington Redskins will be consummated and he'll officially be a New York Jets wide receiver again. Given how much we've heard about Coles' frustration this past season, there shouldn't be a more delighted player in the NFL. There's no question he lucked into the best opportunity he could find after his time in D.C.

"His time in DC" makes it sound as though he had been in prison, not collecting some $18 million for playing two seasons for an NFL team. It really gets good when Coles goes on to say that his complaint in Washington was Hall of Fame coach Joe Gibbs (emphasis added):

Coles' main complaint about Gibbs was the coach's inflexible nature. "I didn't feel respected as a player," Coles said. "I know everything changed [when Gibbs succeeded Spurrier] but when you feel like you're one of the best players at your position, you'd think you could talk to a coach about the play-calling. We didn't have that situation. He called the plays. We ran them. That's where things fell off with me. I realize it's a dictatorship but there's only so much you can take."
Coles sounds like Leon in the Bud commercials here, an egotistical, whiny jerk.

Let's see, how many Super Bowls have been won with Laveranues Coles calling the plays? Right, that would be none. And how many have been won with Joe Gibbs calling the plays? Let's see here, XVII + XXII + XXVI = three.

For that matter, what business would Coles have telling any head coach or any offensive coordinator, regardless of his record, what plays to run? Has new Jets offensive coordinator Mike Heimerdinger promised him partial control of the offense?

He often commiserated with Rod Gardner, another Redskins receiver in search of a trade. "We'd shake our heads and wonder where we fit in every time we saw a new game plan," said Coles, who became a Pro Bowl receiver while playing in Steve Spurrier's pass-happy system a year earlier. "People say we're leaving now because we're selfish, but how are you supposed to be happy as a receiver when you go from a passing offense to a running offense? This wasn't what I signed up for
Obviously, these guys weren't chatting on the way to Mensa meetings. One receiver Gibbs coached, Art Monk, has strong Hall of Fame credentials. Another, Gary Clark, had an outstanding career just short of Hall consideration. Ricky Sanders, Charlie Brown, Alvin Garrett and others also prospered under Gibbs' "conservative" offensive system. Gibbs' teams set a scoring record in 1983 and set a record for scoring margin in 1991. Monk was the first NFL player to catch over 100 passes in a season and retired as the career receptions leader.

Sorry, but if you're a receiver and you don't think that you can prosper under Joe Gibbs, you're just ignorant of history.

According to Coles, his main issue with Gibbs was a matter of trust.
When the season ended, Coles met twice with Gibbs in order to air grievances. Neither session led to any positive results. "We concluded that it was best to go our separate ways," Coles said. "I don't want to get into the details but he basically said he didn't trust me, and I said I didn't trust him."
Not everyone who played for Gibbs liked him; that can be said of every other player and every other coach who ever coached in any sport. A few have accused him of not being straight with them. Notably, Stan Humphries didn't feel as though he's been treated fairly by Gibbs when he was traded in 1992. But most players who have played for him, the overwhelming majority, have praised Gibbs as a trustworthy and honorable man to deal with.

Now, not having been a fly on the wall in all of the various interactions that took place between Gibbs and Coles over the past year, it's impossible judge if Gibbs said or did anything to warrant distrust. All you can do is look at Gibbs' record over the years and look at that of Coles. From the SI article:
Coles was bitter when New York didn't try harder to retain him as a free agent two years ago.
He blasted coach Herman Edwards on the way out the door then. When he was kicked off of the Florida State football team for shoplifting he expressed anger at Bobby Bowden. Fast forward two years and he's received another substantial bonus check, he's bitter, and he's taking pot shots at the coach on the way out the door.

You decide.

Quick Links

Redskins plan to 'spy' Cardinals' David Johnson with rookie Su'a Cravens, per source

Redskins plan to 'spy' Cardinals' David Johnson with rookie Su'a Cravens, per source

Facing one of the NFL's best running backs in Arizona's David Johnson, the Redskins plan to use rookie linebacker Su'a Cravens as a spy in nickel coverage to slow down the Cardinals' threat, per a source close to the team.

Johnson ranks third in the NFL with 921 rushing yards, but it's the variety of ways the Arizona offense uses their second-year running back that makes him so difficult to handle for opposing defenses. Johnson also has 55 catches for 613 yards, and that's just through 11 games.

Cravens comes into the game with momentum as perhaps the Redskins most dynamic defensive threat. With size to play linebacker and enough speed to play coverage, the 6-foot-1, 220 lbs. rookie out of USC will be put in a tough position covering Johnson. The reality of his assignment is to try and contain Johnson as the Cardinals offense is so reliant on the runner that he will get a number of chances.

In their last two games, Johnson has gone for more than 150 total yards in each contest and scored multiple touchdowns. For his part, Cravens has proved a playmaker in his rookie season. To go with 29 tackles in nine games, his stat sheet has sacks and an interception listed.

Getting to Carson Palmer is the best path for the Redskins defense - especially considering the Cardinals' offensive line woes - but using Cravens to try and limit Johnson is a smart course of action for the 'Skins.

One member of the Washington defense explained that Johnson is "going to make plays" but that the key is to limit the damage. If the running back catches a ball out of the backfield, Joe Barry's defense will be focused on making a stop after a five-yard gain, instead of a 20-yard gain.

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

Quick Links

Redskins vs. Cardinals inactives: Reed out as expected

Redskins vs. Cardinals inactives: Reed out as expected

GLENDALE, AZ—As expected, the Redskins will be without star tight end Jordan Reed today against the Cardinals.

He is inactive due to a third-degree AC joint sprain in his left shoulder.

Reed gutted it out and played the second half on Thanksgiving Day in Dallas after being injured in the first but during the week he didn’t practice at all couldn’t regain the range of motion needed to play today.

Coach Jay Gruden said on Friday that the team is planning on having Reed play next week against the Eagles.

For this week, Vernon Davis will step into the starting role.

Also inactive is reserve defensive lineman Anthony Lanier, who was kicked in the lower leg in Dallas. Gruden said that the swelling was still too severe for him to be able to play.

LIVE BLOG: WEEK 13 REDSKINS VS. CARDINALS

The Redskins’ other inactive players today:

  • QB Nate Sudfeld
  • DL AJ Francis
  • RB Matt Jones
  • WR Rashad Ross
  • DB Dashaun Phillips