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A $20 million yearly average is now the floor for a Cousins deal

A $20 million yearly average is now the floor for a Cousins deal

The floor keeps getting higher for Kirk Cousins.

In March, when Brock Osweiler jumped from the Broncos to the Texans for a contract that averages $18 million per year, that was generally accepted to be a floor for a Kirk Cousins deal. Osweiler had just seven NFL starts under his belt and his play was just OK. Cousins was coming off of a very good, 16-start season. If Osweiler was worth $18 million per season then Cousins was worth at least that much.

Yesterday the floor shifted.

Andrew Luck signed an extension is worth about $25 million per year. Luck was the No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft, he has three Pro Bowls on his resume and his teams have been to the playoffs three times and have won three games. He clearly is a cut above Cousins, who has one season as a starter and the Redskins have an 0-1 mark in the playoffs with him at quarterback.

But that doesn’t mean that Luck’s big payday won’t affect Cousins. As the saying goes, a rising tide lifts all boats. Luck’s deal is a rip tide that will raise the salaries of all competent quarterbacks who are fortunate enough to become free agents.

So what is the minimum that Cousins should expect now? It’s hard to see his agent settling for a dime less than $20 million per year on average. That’s 80 percent of Luck’s take on his extension. Even that number may be low but it seems to work as an absolute rock-bottom minimum.

The per-season average money is only one factor in evaluating the value of a contract. Guaranteed money is perhaps even more important. Luck’s extension contains $84 million in guarantees. If we take the same 80 percent of Luck’s guarantees and apply them to Cousins then the Redskins’ QB should figure on something in the neighborhood of $65 million guaranteed.

The Redskins are surveying the landscape. Right now their stance is that they want to see Cousins produce something similar to his 2015 season again before they commit anything close to Luck-type money to him.

They might look at Luck’s deal, wonder how much it will cost them to lock up Cousins if they wait a year, and push to get a deal done by the July 15 deadline. If they are going to make a serious push, however, they had better be willing to start with an annual average value with a “2” in front of it and a pile of guaranteed money that starts with a “6”. It’s doubtful that Cousins’ camp will entertain anything less.

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New #RedskinsTalk Podcast - How freaked out should Redskins fans be after Arizona loss?

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USA Today Sports

New #RedskinsTalk Podcast - How freaked out should Redskins fans be after Arizona loss?

JP Finlay and Rich Tandler address the most important question for Redskins fans after two straight losses - is it time to freak out?

Click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

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Redskins don't request roster exemption for Williams

Redskins don't request roster exemption for Williams

Trent Williams’ suspension ended on Monday and the Redskins did not wait to get him back on the 53-man roster.

NFL teams often request roster exemptions for players who return from suspensions that last multiple games. Such requests routinely are granted for the week leading up to the next game. It gives the team an extra player in practice while the formerly suspended player rounds back into shape.

But the Redskins apparently are going to throw Williams right into things. On Monday, they waived cornerback Dashaun Phillips and cleared a spot for Williams right away.

Yesterday, Jay Gruden confirmed what has been widely reported, that Williams will return to his left tackle spot. Leaving Ty Nsekhe, who did a solid job filling in while Williams was out, at left tackle and putting Williams at left guard is something that will remain something for fans and media to speculate on but not something that will happen on the field.

The Redskins managed to go 2-2 during Williams’ suspension. Perhaps one upside is that Williams may be fully healthy down the stretch after having five weeks off, including the bye week that preceded his suspension.