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Rendon and Werth homer, Nats beat Dodgers to take 2-1 lead in NLDS

Rendon and Werth homer, Nats beat Dodgers to take 2-1 lead in NLDS

Updated 10:46 p.m.

The Nationals know as well as most just how difficult it can be to score runs in the MLB postseason. October has its own way of sorting things out: the pitching improves, nerves come into play and in many cities the temperature drops.

Ask most baseball observers about the 2014 playoffs and they will cite the bullpen and manager Matt Williams as the root of the Nationals' downfall. But they scored just nine runs in four games. Few bullpens or coaches can overcome that.

Through three games in the 2016 NL Division Series, the Nationals have charted a divergent course. They are generating scoring chances consistently and the runs have followed. That success at the plate continued in their 8-3 victory over the Dodgers in Game 3 on Monday afternoon in Los Angeles. Those eight runs were the most ever scored by the Nats in a playoff game and almost what they put up in their entire 2014 NLDS vs. San Francisco.

The Nationals offense erupted to a stellar start, chasing Dodgers rookie standout Kenta Maeda after just three innings. Washington collected four runs in the third inning alone, two thanks to Anthony Rendon's first career postseason homer. It was also his first playoff extra-base hit and run scored. He is now an impressive 10-for-31 (.323) with five RBI through seven career postseason games.

The Nationals' first two runs were plated by Jayson Werth and Bryce Harper earlier in the third. Werth brought in Trea Turner all the way from first on a double to the right field corner, one that gave the speedy Turner a chance against Yasiel Puig's notorious throwing arm. Harper then poked a single to shallow right to score Werth from third.

Werth would add another run to their total in the ninth with a solo homer off vaunted closer Kenley Jansen. The Nats outfielder decimated a 1-0 cutter deep into the left field bleachers. It was his 15th career postseason bomb.

"That one felt pretty good. I played a lot of games here and I've always wanted to hit one out of the stadium," Werth said. "I never thought it was possible, and I still feel the same way. So that ball doesn't get out, I don't think I can do it."

[RELATED: Nats manager Baker on how he got the nickname 'Dusty']

Zimmerman drove in two more later in the ninth on a double off the wall in right field. That scored Daniel Murphy, who walked, and Harper, who was hit by a pitch. Zimmerman redeemed himself for striking out with the bases loaded on three pitches to end the top of the first.

The Dodgers gained an early advantage in the first inning on Nationals starter Gio Gonzalez, once again on a big hit by rookie superstar Corey Seager. After homering in the top of the first of both Games 1 and 2, Seager ripped an RBI double in the bottom of the first on Monday. That scored Justin Turner, who reached with a one-out walk.

The Dodgers got two more runs in the fifth inning to end Gonzalez' day. Those were on a home run by Carlos Ruiz, the fifth of his postseason career. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts originally tapped Andre Ethier to pinch-hit before pulling him back for Ruiz. The veteran catcher then smoked a 3-1 fastball over the fence to score himself and Joc Pederson, who got on with a one-out single. 

Pederson and Ruiz landed two of the four hits Gonzalez surrendered on the afternoon. He walked one and was charged with three runs through 4 1/3 innings.

The Nationals' bullpen continued to shine in Game 3. Lefty Sammy Solis made his third straight appearance, this time with 1 2/3 scoreless innings. He's tossed four shutout frames this series on two hits and two walks. Solis has yet to show his inexperience and looks like the unique weapon he was for much of the regular season.

[RELATED: Report: D'Back want Nats GM Mike Rizzo for front office]

Fellow lefty Oliver Perez then faced two batters in the seventh and allowed one hit. Shawn Kelley finished the frame, capped by a strikeout of Turner in a full count, and returned to toss a perfect eighth. Kelley went 1 2/3 perfect frames with three strikeouts and built a bridge to closer Mark Melancon, who tossed a clean ninth.

The Nats' relief corps has yet to allow a run this postseason through 12 1/3 innings. Collectively, they have 14 strikeouts.

"I tell you, the bullpen was awesome," manager Dusty Baker said. "All the guys contributed. Sammy Solis got the win, but he did an outstanding job. What a job that Kelley did for us. I mean, he went through the heart of the order and that's the best we've seen him in a while, but he was well rested."

"It's exciting. I guess it could be maybe a little boring at times because they get everybody out," Rendon said.

Murphy went 0-for-4 outside of his walk. Turner singled and scored, but struck out three times. He has eight strikeouts through three playoff games. Danny Espinosa also had a rough day with a strikeout and a hit-by-pitch, his third of the series. That's the most ever in an NLDS.

The rest of the Nationals lineup did plenty to compensate for those troubles. Harper had a single, two walks and a run. Werth had three hits - including the homer - and a walk and is now 5-for-13 with four runs scored in the series. Zimmerman walked, singled and doubled. He now has five hits in the series.

With a 2-1 lead in the NLDS, the Nationals are one win away from advancing to the Championship Series. The NLCS would push them closer than any D.C. sports team has been to a world championship in 18 years. 

The last D.C. major sports (MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL) team to reach the semifinals of their league was the 1997-98 Capitals, who were swept by the Detroit Red Wings in the Stanley Cup Finals. No other North American city with at least three such teams has waited longer.

The 1998 Caps are the only D.C. team to get that close to a world title since 1992, when the Redskins won the Super Bowl. That was the last D.C. world championship. Only Minneapolis-St. Paul has waited longer for a title, among U.S. cities with at least three major sports teams.

Put simply, one more win would be the biggest victory for a D.C. team in almost 20 years. The Nationals have been close before. They were one strike away in 2012. Now, they have another chance.

Quotes via SportsNet Los Angeles and ASAPsports.com

[RELATED: Nats manager Baker on how he got the nickname 'Dusty']

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Nationals, MLB betting odds and prop bets for 2017 season

Nationals, MLB betting odds and prop bets for 2017 season

Sports Betting Dime released betting odds and prop bets for the 2017 MLB season this week.

According to the sports book, the Nationals, in particular, sit well in their chances to win the World Series, as well as to have the NL MVP in Bryce Harper and the NL Cy Young Award winner in Max Scherzer.

Harper, at 5/1, also has the best odds to have the largest home run increase of any player in Major League Baseball this season among players who hit a minimum of 20 a year ago.

The Nationals and Orioles, for what it’s worth, also have 199/1 odds – sixth best – to meet each other in the World Series. The Orioles have 50/1 odds to win it in general.

But there’s also some interesting prop bets, as well, namely a number of things involving former Heisman Trophy winner and NFL quarterback Tim Tebow, who has been assigned to the Mets’ low Class A affiliate to begin the season.

For a full list of odds and props, click here.

RELATED: Donald Trump will not throw out Nationals Opening Day first pitch

Odds to win World Series

Chicago Cubs: 11/2

Cleveland Indians: 8/1

Boston Red Sox: 9/1

Los Angeles Dodgers: 9/1

Washington Nationals: 14/1

Baltimore Orioles: 50/1

Odds to meet in the 2017 World Series

Cubs-Indians: 13/1

Cubs-Red Sox: 16/1

Cubs-Yankees: 66/1

Mets-Yankees: 195/1

Dodgers-Angels: 166/1

Orioles-Nationals: 199/1

National League MVP

Kris Bryant (Cubs): 6/1

Bryce Harper (Nationals): 7/1

Corey Seager (Dodgers): 9/1

Nolan Arenado (Rockies): 9/1

Clayton Kershaw (Dodgers): 2/1

Max Scherzer (Nationals): 5/1

Noah Syndergaard (Mets): 8/1

National League Cy Young Award

Clayton Kershaw (Dodgers): 2/1

Max Scherzer (Nationals): 5/1

Noah Syndergaard (Mets): 8/1

Odds at least one player hits 50-plus home runs: 7/4

Over/under number of players to hit 40-plus home runs: 6.5

Odds Tim Tebow …

--gets an at bat for the Mets this season: 250/1

--retires or is released before the end of the 2017 World Series: 2/1

--over/under career MLB home runs for Tim Tebow: 0.5

Odds to have the largest home run increase from 2016 (minimum 20 HRs):

Bryce Harper (Nationals; 24 in 2016): 5/1

Giancarlo Stanton (Marlins; 27): 11/2

Gary Sanchez (Yankees; 20): 7/1

Jose Bautista (Blue Jays; 22): 9/1

Jose Abreu (White Sox; 24): 9/1

Odds Alex Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez announce their engagement in 2017: 3/1

RELATED: 10 insane ballpark foods you'll find in 2017

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Donald Trump will not throw out Nationals Opening Day first pitch

Donald Trump will not throw out Nationals Opening Day first pitch

One of the most iconic moments in sports is when the President of the United States throws out a first pitch at a baseball game. In fact, every president dating back to William Taft in 1910 has thrown at least one Opening Day ceremonial first pitch during their time in office. 

At least for this year, Donald Trump will not join that long lists of presidents. 

According to Bryon Kerr, President Trump will not partake in the tradition due to scheduling conflicts.

Traditionally the ceremonial first pitch by presidents has been done on Opening Day, but also there have been presidents that have thrown the first pitch at the All-Star Game, and even during the World Series; none was perhaps more memorable that George W. Bush's first pitch in the 2001 World Series. 

Regularly presidents have thrown out the first pitch on Opening Day, but it is not uncommon for presidents to miss out on one of baseball's sacred days. George W. Bush only threw the Opening Day pitch in six of his eight years as president. He would also throw a Ceremonial first pitch in 2009, his first year out of office. Barack Obama would only throw one Opening Day first pitch and that was in 2010 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the now forgotten tradition. 

Before his presidency, President Trump has thrown one first pitch to start a baseball game. It was during the 2006 regular season at Fenway Park. 

RELATED: Tim Tebow strikes out in three pitches from Max Sherzer