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Nats consider playoff roster

Nats consider playoff roster

This season has brought about many new ideas and emotions for the Nationals, who for the first time since they arrived in Washington are legitimately in a pennant race. And as a result of that, here's another new concept we're going to have to consider: the August 31 playoff roster deadline.

You've probably been vaguely aware of this deadline in the past but never really had to consider the ins and outs of it. Rest assured, you're not alone. I've had to learn more about all this myself, and even the Nationals front-office folks I talked to the last couple days admitted they had to take something of a crash course on the subject because they've never needed to be experts before.

So consider this an entry-level class in the suddenly pertinent matter of playoff roster construction...

You've probably heard plenty of times before that all postseason rosters must be set by August 31. But that's not entirely true. The only thing that must be set by the end of the month is the pool of players who are eligible to appear in the postseason. And even then, there are exceptions that allow more players to be added at the last minute.

The only real significance of the August 31 deadline is that it marks the final day in which a player can be acquired from another organization and be eligible to participate in the postseason. So the Nationals can't trade for someone on Sept. 1 and use him in October.

That doesn't mean a player must be on the active, big-league roster on August 31 to be eligible for the playoffs. Anyone on the 25-man roster, plus anyone on the disabled list, bereavement list or suspended list is eligible.

So that makes this the Nationals' initial pool of roster candidates (we're going to assume there are no changes in the next seven days)...

Pitchers (12): Sean Burnett, Tyler Clippard, Ross Detwiler, Gio Gonzalez, Michael Gonzalez, Tom Gorzelanny, Edwin Jackson, Ryan Mattheus, Craig Stammen, Drew Storen, Stephen Strasburg, Jordan Zimmermann
Catchers (2): Jesus Flores, Kurt Suzuki
Infielders (6): Ian Desmond, Danny Espinosa, Adam LaRoche, Steve Lombardozzi, Chad Tracy, Ryan Zimmerman
Outfielders (5): Roger Bernadina, Bryce Harper, Tyler Moore, Michael Morse, Jayson Werth
Disabled list (6): Mark DeRosa, Cole Kimball (60-day), Wilson Ramos (60-day), Henry Rodriguez, Jhonatan Solano, Chien-Ming Wang

So that's 31 eligible players. But wait, there's more.

If any one of those 31 players is injured at the start of any postseason series, the Nationals can replace them with any other player from the organization (provided they were acquired by August 31).

Ramos will remain on the DL at season's end, so that's a playoff roster spot that can be given to someone else, whether they're on the 40-man roster or not. And it's not a stretch to think any one of those other players currently on the DL could still be there come October, opening more spots.

Which means September call-ups can be used in the postseason. That opens the door for potential additions like Corey Brown, Eury Perez, John Lannan and others we may see over the season's final month.

And truthfully, it opens the door for anyone else in the organization to be a part of October baseball. Not that this would happen in a million years, but even a guy like Carlos Alvarez (who you may remember as the fake Esmailyn Gonzalez, currently a 26-year-old shortstop at short-season Class A Auburn) could appear for the Nationals in the postseason, provided he was added to the 40-man roster.

The whole thing may sound a bit convoluted, but there's really only one key point you have to remember: If a player is in the organization on August 31 (and is still there at the end of the regular season) he's eligible for the playoffs.

Something you probably never thought about before. Certainly something I never did.

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Bryce Harper knows why he didn't play well, but he won't specify why

Bryce Harper knows why he didn't play well, but he won't specify why

Bryce Harper struggled by his standards in 2016 and he says he know why it happened last year. While it was rumored last season that he was playing through injuries, Harper never really missed significant time, nor did he really say that his injuries were the reason for his disappointing numbers. 

Speaking with the media today at spring training, Harper hinted at his injuries from last season as he said he was just trying to stay in the lineup every day.  

Although Harper's statistics dropped off dramatically from his MVP season in 2015, his numbers weren't entirely awful last year. He still hit 24 homers, drove in 86 runs and he had an .814 OPS. 

With a full offseason to heal up, Harper will be a prime bounce-back candidate as he looks to help the Nationals win their third NL East title in the last four years. 

Related: Sorry D.C. sports fans, Bryce Harper is a Dallas Cowboys fan

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Nationals' Max Scherzer says he may not be ready for season opener

Nationals' Max Scherzer says he may not be ready for season opener

The Nationals aren't certain to have ace Max Scherzer ready to pitch for Opening Day. Scherzer, 32, was unable to compete in the World Baseball Classic this summer due to a stress fracture in his right ring finger. 

When he spoke to the media today at the first bullpen session of spring training, he said that the fracture has healed but the symptoms continue. 

Scherzer also said he'd just started throwing again this week. Manager Dusty Baker confimed that the Nationals don't know whether Scherzer will be ready to start the season. 

Any time a team's star pitcher suffers an unusual hand injury, it's cause for concern for the club and fans. 

Scherzer won the NL Cy Young Award last season and posted a 20-7 record as a starter. He also led the MLB with 284 strikeouts. 

Scherzer is an especially vital part of the Nationals rotation considering the injury history of Stephen Strasburg, who landed on the DL twice last season, once with soreness in the elbow that needed Tommy John surgery in 2010. 

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