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Morse has torn sheath, bone bruise in wrist

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Morse has torn sheath, bone bruise in wrist

NEW YORK -- An examination of Michael Morse's left wrist this morning revealed a torn sheath and bone bruise, injuries that while currently painful don't require surgery and could possibly allow the Nationals' left fielder to return to the lineup Friday in Atlanta.

Morse said the diagnosis actually gave him peace of mind, relieving any worries he had a break or more significant tear that would keep him out longer.

"Oh, yeah. For sure," he said. "Just have to get it better now."

There's not a whole lot Morse can do to help speed along the healing process, aside from rest and some anti-inflammatory medication. The plan for now: He's not playing in tonight's series finale against the Mets and will be off with the rest of the club Thursday. He'll then attempt to take batting practice Friday in Atlanta, at which point the Nationals will decide whether he's ready to play or needs more time to recover.

"We asked for anything we can do," Morse said. "They pretty much said the best thing is just to let it calm down."

The Nationals also will send copies of Morse's MRI to a specialist in Baltimore, seeking another opinion.

The injury has plagued Morse for about a month and could be a byproduct of him compensating for another injury to his right thumb. Unable to grip his bat during a mid-August series in San Francisco, he attempted a one-handed swing, adding stress to his left wrist.

Morse has played through the pain since, but his production has dropped off. Since that series against the Giants, he's hitting .238 with two homers and zero doubles.

After going 0-for-5 during Tuesday night's win, he told manager Davey Johnson about the extent of his pain.

"I'm sick of hurting the team," he said.

"He's been trying to play through it, but I was going to give him off anyway because I thought he had to be hurting the way he's been swinging," Johnson said. "Glad to find out about it. Wished he'd have said something. Maybe we could've given him some time off and then he wouldn't have had to struggle through this little batting slump."

The sheath is a layer of connective tissue that surrounds the wrist. If completely torn, it could require surgery, but that doesn't appear to be the case for Morse.

This is merely the latest ailment to interrupt Morse's season. He missed the season's first two months with a torn lat muscle and missed time last month after getting hit by a pitch in his right hand.

Overall, the 30-year-old is hitting .285 with 13 homers, 49 RBI and a .758 OPS in 88 total games on the heels of a breakthrough 2011 in which he led the Nationals with a .303 average, 31 homers, 95 RBI and a .910 OPS.

"It's been a tough year," he said. "I'm going to try to help the team as much as possible."

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Nats beat Mariners behind Joe Ross' career day in return from minors

Nats beat Mariners behind Joe Ross' career day in return from minors

WASHINGTON -- Anthony Rendon homered twice and drove in five runs, Joe Ross returned from the minors to allow one run over a career high-tying eight innings, and the Washington Nationals routed the Seattle Mariners 10-1 on Tuesday night.

Bryce Harper added his 14th homer and Jayson Werth hit his seventh off Chris Bergman (1-2), who allowed all of the Nationals' runs and 14 of their 15 hits.

Rendon doubled before his second homer -- and seventh of the season -- completed an eight-run fourth inning. Ryan Zimmerman also had three hits.

Mike Zunino homered off Ross (2-0) in his return from his own minor league stint. Robinson Cano was hitless in his first game back from the disabled list following a thigh injury as Seattle dropped its fourth straight.

Ross showed no signs of the late April struggles that ended with a demotion to Triple-A Syracuse. He yielded five hits and a walk while striking out six, and retired 12 straight batters after a leadoff single to begin the game.

By the time Seattle finally put multiple runners aboard, Washington had already opened a 10-0 lead.

Rendon's second-inning shot around the left field foul pole made it 2-0.

Then Werth, Harper and Rendon all connected in the fourth, helping the Nationals score seven of their eight runs in the inning with two outs.

MORE NATIONALS: WATCH: Werth, Harper go back-to-back, Rendon hits 2 HRs in Nationals win

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WATCH: Werth and Harper go back-to-back, Rendon hits 2 HRs in Nats win

WATCH: Werth and Harper go back-to-back, Rendon hits 2 HRs in Nats win

The Nationals had a big day at the plate Tuesday night.

Washington hit four home runs, including three in an eight-run fourth inning, in its 10-1 victory over the Seattle Mariners.

Third baseman Anthony Rendon hit two home runs – the first a two-run blast to left field in the second inning and the second a three-run shot to center in the fourth. He finished the game 3-for-4 with five RBIs.

Prior to Rendon’s second homer in the fourth inning, left fielder Jayson Werth hit a two-run blast to left field, which was followed by a solo shot from right fielder Bryce Harper in the next at-bat.

Harper’s homer was measured at 450 feet.

At the end of the fourth, the Nationals led 10-0, which also included an RBI single from catcher Matt Wieters and an RBI triple from shortstop Trea Turner.

Tuesday night’s contest was the first of a three-game home series against the Mariners, who play in the American League. The Nationals and Mariners also will play Wednesday and Thursday.

Earlier this season in a 23-5 win over the New York Mets on April 30, Rendon went 6-for-6 with three home runs and 10 RBIs to become the first player to accomplish that feat since at least 1913. He now has seven homers this season.

Harper’s homer was his 14th of the season, tying him for first in the National League with the Atlanta Braves’ Freddie Freeman. The New York Yankees’ Aaron Judge is first with 15.

Though he did not have a home run Tuesday night, Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman has 13 for the season.

MORE NATIONALS: 2017 MLB Power Rankings: As Bryce Harper goes, so do the Nationals