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Experience could be key for Jackson in Game 3

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Experience could be key for Jackson in Game 3

A veteran of 10 major-league seasons, Edwin Jackson has helped lead a young Nationals pitching staff all year. He's helped show them what it takes to pitch every fifth day, how to slow down when an inning gets out of hand and how to prepare day after day throughout a 162-game season.

But on Wednesday Jackson will face his toughest test yet: Put the Nationals in position to win a pivotal Game 3 after two games where their starting pitching all of a sudden wasn't sharp. A strong start from Jackson could set the tone and sway the momentum of the series back in Washington's direction. It's a place he has been before and hopes to draw from the experience.

"The thing about postseason baseball is, the game can speed up real quick," he said. "You have to kind of control the pace and control the tempo. And having experience in that, it definitely helps when you get in those situations, being able to slow the game down and kind of take the crowd out of the equation and just think about concentrating on what you have to do."

Jackson has pitched in seven postseason games in his career, including twice in the World Series. Wednesday might not be an elimination game, but Jackson understands what is at stake for the young Nationals. Most of his teammates have never been in the playoffs, much less had to battle from behind in a series.

"It's high expectations on me.I have high expectations on myself, as well," he said. "This is one of those games where you go out and you try to lead by example."

Jackson has pitched in the playoffs before, but the results of his postseason outings do not suggest any guarantees. The right-hander, in fact, has a history of giving up runs early and has produced an overall mixed bag when the stakes are high.

Jackson started four games last postseason for the Cardinals, the team he will face on Wednesday. He earned the win in his first, Game 4 of the NLDS against Philadelphia, with six innings of two-run ball. But the two runs were actually allowed before he recorded a single out in the first.

Jackson pitched two games of the 2011 NLCS. In Game 2 against the Milwaukee Brewers, he allowed seven hits and a two-run homer to Rickie Weeks in a no-decision. The Cardinals ended up winning 12-3.

In Game 6, Jackson made it just two innings after giving up three home runs. The Cardinals had built a lead of four runs before he even took the mound. St. Louis also scored 12 runs that day and won 12-6.

Jackson started Game 4 of the World Series against the Texas Rangers and again was scored on early with a run allowed in the first. Jackson was able to pitch into the bottom of the sixth despite walking seven batters to go with three hits. The Cardinals lost the game, 4-0, thanks to eight innings of shutout ball by Derek Holland.

Jackson's other World Series appearance was with the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008. He pitched two innings of relief in Game 4, allowing a home run to pitcher Joe Blanton in what ended as a blowout loss to the Phillies.

Having been through each round before, and last season winning it all, nerves shouldn't be an issue for Jackson. And perhaps having both the ups and downs as a postseason starter will help him get over the hump this time around.

"Every inning you have to treat like it's the ninth inning, and you definitely want to come out and you want to get in a rhythm as early as possible," he said.

The most important factor in Jackson's prior experience may be the effect on his teammates. Catcher Kurt Suzuki says it will help everyone be calm and comfortable.

"I think it will definitely help out knowing that he's done this before. That he's been in these types of situations will definitely give him a little bit of an advantage."

Ryan Zimmerman feels assured that Jackson has pitched in games with the pressure of this one before.

"He has been through a lot and obviously he's pitched a ton in the postseason," Zimmerman said. "For him to have that experience and to go out there in a pivotal game in this series is gonna be great for us."

Jackson may have an inconsistent record in postseason games, but the mere fact he's been there before could make the biggest difference.

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This year's Nationals roster is stacked with glorious facial hair

This year's Nationals roster is stacked with glorious facial hair

The following is a list of things the 2017 Washington Nationals appear to have: A talented outfield led by Bryce Harper and Adam Eaton. A rising superstar at shortstop in Trea Turner. A possibly major hole at closer.

The following is a list of things the 2017 Washington Nationals appear to not have: Razors. Shaving cream. A desire to groom their faces.

A fun tradition at each team's spring training is the annual photo day, because photo day forces professional athletes to pose in front of cameras like they're being featured in the poster of an upcoming blockbuster movie. And after poring through the snapshots from the Nationals' photo day, a single trend emerged.

This year's team is a hairy bunch.

Among that bunch are the usual suspects, such as Bryce Harper, Anthony Rendon and Jayson Werth:

But there are some surprises, most notably of which is Stephen Strasburg. The right-hander tends to keep his mug 100-percent clean-shaven, but for now, at least, he's allowed his face to become quite fertile:

Then there's newcomer Adam Lind, who has a goatee that Duke's Blue Devil logo would be forced to respect:

Shawn Kelley, meanwhile, who's pictured below, has a beard that looks like...

...Derek Norris' beard, before Derek Norris' beard hit puberty and grew up to be the strong, mature beard it is today:

There are scraggly ones, such as Daniel Murphy's:

And fuller, more complete ones, like Eaton's (full marks, by the way, for the trade acquisition's ability to seamlessly connect 'stache to beard):

The most wild photo of all, however, was this one of Turner. Is this the Nats stud, or a picture of Leonard DiCaprio from a scene in The Revenant? Hard to tell with all that stubble the infielder's cultivating:

One potential positive of this team-wide movement: If Turner and his teammates keep what they're growing down in Florida going throughout the season, their faces will be plenty warm by the time playoff baseball comes around. 

RELATED: HARPER GOES YARD IN FIRST AT-BAT OF THE SPRING

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Nationals' Bryce Harper mashes monster homer on second pitch of spring training

Nationals' Bryce Harper mashes monster homer on second pitch of spring training

The Nationals played their first game of spring training today against the Mets. They won, but that's not nearly the biggest story of the day. It was Bryce Harper's first at-bat that stole the show. 

On just the second pitch he saw of spring training, from lefty Sean Gilmartin, Harper mashed a ginormous home run to right center field. MLB.com shared video of the bomb. 

According to Jorge Castillo of the Washington Post, Harper smacked the ball at least 400 feet. In his second at-bat, he hit a line-drive single on the first pitch. 

Let's just say it was an exciting start to the year for Harper, who won the 2015 NL MVP only to endure a let-down last season. As Castillo points out, the slugger hit .226 against left-handed pitchers in 2016. 

Harper enters spring training at 230 pounds, up 15 pounds of muscle from last year. 

“I just felt going into the offseason you want to get as strong as you can, try to maintain your weight the best you can and just do everything the right way,” he told the Post. 

MORE NATIONALS: Baker thinks DC sports teams can win a championship this year