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Report: IIHF assures NHL that it won’t allow players under contract to play in the Olympics

Report: IIHF assures NHL that it won’t allow players under contract to play in the Olympics

Alex Ovechkin has said he hopes to go to the Olympics next February.

Ted Leonsis has said he won’t stand in Ovi’s way if that’s what he chooses to do.

As it turns out, however, suiting up for Russia in PyeongChang may not even be an option for the Capitals’ captain, according to one report.

NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly told The Athletic last week that the International Ice Hockey Federation has assured the league that NHL players under contract won’t be allowed to participate in the Olympic tournament.

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To be clear, that’s not the Capitals saying Ovechkin can’t go to South Korea.

Or the league saying he can’t represent his homeland.

That’s the Olympic tournament’s sanctioning body saying it won’t roster NHL players who go rogue.

From Pierre LeBrun’s fantastic article, which chronicled a day in the hectic life of Daly:

As Daly explains, the International Ice Hockey Federation has given the NHL assurances that it won't allow any NHL players under contract to participate in the Olympic tournament.

“So I just don't think it will be an issue,” he said.

Daly also told LeBrun that the league has not prepared a memo warning teams and/or players about the consequences should someone bolt for the 2018 Winter Games.

“No, because we don't believe it's going to be an issue,” Daly was quoted as saying.

Ovechkin has been in town working out ahead of training camp for a couple of weeks. He’ll address reporters for the first time this season on Friday at media day.

And you can be sure he’ll once again be asked about going to the Olympics in the middle of the Capitals’ season.

Based on Daly’s comments, though, it seems the question might have been answered already.

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Alex Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov team up for preseason game in Montreal

Alex Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov team up for preseason game in Montreal

Two nights after opening the preseason with a loss in New Jersey, the Capitals will make a day trip to Montreal on Wednesday for Game 2 of the exhibition season.

And they’ll ice a completely new group of players.

Here’s how Coach Barry Trotz will have them line up:

Forwards
Ovechkin-Kuznetsov-Vrana
Simpson-Stephenson-Smith-Pelly
Connolly-Pilon-Wilson
Sill-Albert-Peluso

Defense
Orpik-Hobbs
Jokipakka-Bowey
Siegenthaler-Williams

Goalies
Grubauer
Copley

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A few notes and observations from the skate:

  • The Caps made the first roster move of the preseason Wednesday morning, returning 2014 seventh rounder Kevin Elgestal to HC Vita Hasten. On Monday night in New Jersey, Elgestal got pickpocketed by Devils first overall pick Nico Hischier on Hischier’s nifty goal.
  • Coach Barry Trotz said the first significant round of cuts is coming Thursday, followed by another round over the weekend. The roster currently stands at 39 forwards, 18 defensemen and 7 goalies.
  • The stakes are high Wednesday night for a handful of players who are battling for spots. Among them: Vrana, Smith-Pelly, Peluso up front and Bowey on the backend. Vrana’s getting a look on the top line, Smith-Pelly is coming off his best day of practice on Tuesday, Peluso has looked good so far and Bowey needs a strong showing in the preseason to lock down a spot.
  • Trotz on Peluso, who is vying for the right wing spot on the fourth line: “He’s got pretty good hands for a man that’s known for other qualities. He’s a student of the game, works on his game. I like what he’s done in camp. We’ll see how he does tonight.”
  • Stephenson, a prospect who’s appeared in 13 games for the Caps the past two seasons, is the only player who will have appeared in both of the first two exhibition games. Stephenson can play center and wing. He’s also got to clear waivers in order to be sent to the minors. “He’s got a skillset that is NHL ready,” Trotz said. “Now it’s just can he showcase and be very consistent. If he does and has production, I think his chances are very good.” 
  • After taking a pair of faceoff penalties Monday night, Trotz said the coaches reviewed some video with the centers. There was also discussion about slashing fouls after the Caps were whistled for three infractions in Newark. “Players are really smart, and they will adjust,” Trotz said.

 

MORE CAPITALS: JAY BEAGLE SEES METHOD TO THE MADNESS OF NHL'S FACEOFF EMPHASIS

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Jay Beagle sees method to the madness of NHL's faceoff emphasis

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USA TODAY Sports

Jay Beagle sees method to the madness of NHL's faceoff emphasis

Monday’s preseason opener was a tough game to watch. With two teams opening their preseason slate, some sloppy hockey was expected. What was not expected, however, was the 20 minor penalties doled out on the night.

Along with slashing, faceoffs is a point of emphasis for the NHL this season. Referees and linesmen will be much stricter when enforcing faceoff rules, specifically where a player positions his stick and skate while taking a faceoff.

That emphasis was on full display in New Jersey as three faceoff violation penalties were issued, one within the game’s first minute.

“Just from what guys had said that played in the game and everything just obviously messing up with the flow and just having all those penalties, it sounded kind of crazy,” Capitals center Jay Beagle told reporters on Tuesday. “It's something to be seen, I guess. I hope they're just trying it out in preseason.”

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Beagle stands to be the most affected by the faceoff crackdown as the team's top faceoff man. He led the team last season with a faceoff win percentage of 56.4-percent, tied for the 12th best in the NHL among players who took 100 faceoffs or more. He was the only center on the team with a positive faceoff percentage in the defensive zone (56.8-percent) and shorthanded (55.7-percent).

Like everyone, Beagle was not a fan of how the referees enforced the faceoff rules on Monday.

“It's a tough rule to enforce because to make it like it was [Monday] with a bunch of penalties and just the first period with no flow, I don't know if you guys enjoyed watching it, but most people did not like it,” he said. “I don't think that's good for the game.”

But that doesn't mean Beagle doesn't agree with it. Whle Monday's game was ugly, to say the least, he does understand where the NHL is coming from and even wondered if stricter enforcement could perhaps be a good thing.

“Little tweaks here and there to the rule that they’re trying to imply, I think it would work,” Beagle said.

By rule, for a faceoff in the defensive zone, the defensive forward must put his stick down first. Technically the offensive player is then supposed to put his stick down before the faceoff, but in practice linesmen frequently will drop the puck once the defensive forward's stick is down. This gives the offensive player an advantage as he is more easily able to get his stick under for the win.

“Say in the D-zone my stick has to come down first and an offensive guy has to bring his stick down first and they pause for a second and then drop the puck,” Beagle said, “It's more even than me putting my stick down first, an offensive guy flying into the dot and snapping it back on me. It might make it more even.”

So there may be a method to the NHL’s madness even if all we saw on Monday was the madness. Both the players and referees will have to adjust throughout the preseason in order to ensure a much cleaner look at the faceoff dot in the regular season.

“It's going to be something that you have to work on quite a bit,” Beagle said. “It'll take a lot adjustment for everyone."

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