Quick Links

Daniel Winnik calls current playoff format 'the stupidest thing ever'

Daniel Winnik calls current playoff format 'the stupidest thing ever'

If you’re frustrated by the NHL’s current playoff format, Daniel Winnik feels your pain.

The playoff format has become a topic of conversation around the NHL recently as the top three teams in the NHL and four of the top five all hail from the Metropolitan Division. Because of the league’s divisional playoff format, the first place team will play a wild-card team in the first round, while the second and third place team will have to play each other with the winner of each series squaring off in the second round.

That guarantees that two of the top three teams in the NHL will be eliminated by the second round and that just doesn’t make much sense to Winnik.

“It's stupid,” he said. “It's the stupidest thing ever. I don't know why it's not 1 to 8, I don't know why we got away from that.”

RELATED: Orpik misses practice Monday

The obvious flaw of the news system is that, by restricting the top three teams to play within one division, in years like this where there is one super conference, it means an unfavorable first-round matchup for a team that is one of the best in the entire league. As of Monday, Columbus and Pittsburgh are second and third in the entire NHL standings and their reward would be the chance to play one another in the very first round. Also, by adding a wild card that does not stay within the division, there is an obvious benefit for a team like the New York Rangers to finish fourth and switch to the Atlantic side of the bracket.

There is also a potential for the third place team in one division to actually finish lower in the standings than a wild card team, but not have to play the best team in the conference. We saw that in 2016. The Detroit Red Wings had the eighth-best record in the Eastern Conference, but the third best in the Atlantic. Instead of having to play the top-seeded Capitals in the first round, they played the Tampa Bay Lightning who finished second in the Atlantic, but sixth overall in the conference.

What makes things worse, as Winnik points out, is that the current playoff system isn’t even that good and doing what is was originally set up to accomplish.

“Part of the point of it was to reduce travel, but it only reduces travel if you finish in your division, if you finish second and third,” he said.

In theory, having teams play within the division should cut down on travel, but as wild card teams can come from either division, it fails to accomplish that. Last season featured a first-round matchup between the Anaheim Ducks, winners of the Pacific, and a wild card Nashville Predators team. And, since the Predators switched into the Pacific bracket, once they beat the Ducks they had to play the San Jose Sharks in the second round.

If geography isn't your thing, let's just say Nashville is nowhere close to either Anaheim or San Jose.

Most damning, however, is the fact that the divisonal foramt undercuts rivalries by making it more likely that rivals play in the earlier rounds.

First and foremost, the divisional format was created to develop rivalries. By pitting divisional teams against one another, that means teams that play one another frequently in the regular season are more likely to play in the playoffs every year. But, to use the Caps as an example, unless Pittsburgh makes it into the playoffs as a wild card team and play in the Atlantic, they will always play Washington in the first or second round, never in the conference final.

“You can't manufacture a rivalry,” Winnik said. “There's already rivalries between us and Pittsburgh, us and the Rangers. The way I see it now, I'm sure the fans are getting sick of seeing the same two teams play each other in the first round, second round.”

In the previous format, the winner of each division was one of the top three seeds in each conference and then the remaining five teams were seeded according to the standings regardless of division. No. 1 would play No. 8, No. 2 would play No. 7, etc. and each team was re-seeded at the end of each round. So instead of a set bracket, the highest seed was guaranteed to play the lowest seed in each round.

As an illustration, and bearing in mind that the NHL has gone from six divisions to four, here is what the first-round playoff matchups in the east would look like as of Monday:

1. Washington Capitals (Metropolitan winner)
8. Toronto Maple Leafs

2. Montreal Canadiens (Atlantic winner)
7. Boston Bruins

3. Columbus Blue Jackets
6. Ottawa Senators

4. Pittsburgh Penguins
5. New York Rangers

This format, however, is not without its faults.

“The other way wasn't perfect,” Winnik said. “For years this division, the southeast, the winner of that division should have been out of the playoffs, but at least that made a little more sense.”

It should also be noted that if there were no upsets in the first round, the above projection would still give a second-round matchup between Washington and Pittsburgh. But it does seem fairer than a format that moves New York down to seventh simply because of their division and forces the second and third best teams in the NHL to play one another in the first round.

That's a concept that clearly has Winnik a bit…befuddled.

“I don't understand it and I think everyone hopes it gets fixed after this season.”

MORE CAPITALS: Oshie tries to remain 'extremley present' even in a contract year

Quick Links

The Capitals were not pleased with the officiating in Game 1

The Capitals were not pleased with the officiating in Game 1

They did not want to talk about it, but it was clear after Game 1 that the Caps were not pleased about how Game 1 was officiated.

In a tense postseason matchup between two rivals that featured several scrums and dustups, Washington was not given a single power play and was shorthanded twice after what looked like soft calls.

RELATED: Prediction recap: Sidney Crosby ruins everything

Alex Ovechkin took an interference penalty in the first period for a weak hit on Patric Hornqvist and Matt Niskanen was given a slashing penalty for swiping at a puck just as Marc-Andre Fleury tried to freeze it.

“For all the stuff that was going on, I'm not going to criticize the referees,” Trotz said when asked about Niskanen’s penalty. “They do an outstanding job, but at the same time, I thought with all the stuff that was going on, it was a pretty light one.”

Pittsburgh, meanwhile, was given only one penalty on the night, a matching minor between Scott Wilson and Kevin Shattenkirk.

Considering how good the Caps are on the power play, it was frustrating for the team to not get that unit on the ice. That frustration was compounded by what looked like two rather soft calls against Washington.

Following the game, the players would not criticize the referees, but they still made their displeasure known.

“No comment,” Niskanen said when asked about the officiating.

“It was kind of weird game,” Ovechkin said. “No penalties on their side. Sometimes those kind of [expletive] happen and you just have to fight through it and just put the puck in.”

MORE CAPITALS: 3 key observations: Pittsburgh capitalizes

Quick Links

Prediction recap: Sidney Crosby ruins everything

Prediction recap: Sidney Crosby ruins everything

The Caps battled back from a 2-0 deficit but ultimately fell 3-2 to the Pittsburgh Penguins on Thursday.

Here’s a recap of the three bold predictions for Game 1.

1. Washington will score first - Wrong

Neither team was able to score in the first period, but Sidney Crosby made short work of this prediction in the second period with a goal just 12 seconds in. He then added a second for good measure at the 1:04 mark to put the Penguins up 2-0.

RELATED: 3 key observations: Pittsburgh capitalizes

2. Patric Hornqvist will draw a penalty - Correct

It was a softy and it wasn’t for the reason I thought it would be, but it counts. Alex Ovechkin knocked into Hornqvist as the Penguins rushed the Caps’ offensive zone early in the first period. When I wrote this prediction, I expected him to get knocked around a bit in front of the net, not in the neutral zone. Considering I got the other two predictions wrong, however, yeah, I’m taking the point.

3. Sidney Crosby will not get a point – Very Wrong

Not only did Crosby get a point, he got two to match his total from all six games in last season’s series. And not only did he get two points, they were both goals.

2017 Results: Crosby ruined the Caps' night and my predictions. The man must be stopped!

Correct: 9
Wrong: 11
Push: 1

MORE CAPITALS: David Letterman shows up at Game 1 of Caps-Penguins