Tragic end for former Maryland basketball player

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Tragic end for former Maryland basketball player

By JP Finlay
CSNbaltimore.com

Former Maryland basketball player Earl Badu died from an apparent suicide on Sept. 27, Baltimore County Police officials confirmed on Sept. 28.

Badu apparently jumped from an eastern Baltimore County overpass on I-95 and dropped some 50 feet before landing on I-695, according to reports. Medical personnel transported Badu to Johns Hopkins Bayview, where he was pronounced dead.

A fan favorite during his time in College Park, Badu was a walk-on player for the Maryland team that won the national championship in 2002. Badu, a Baltimore native, found himself in legal and financial trouble in the years preceding his death.

At the time of his death, Badu was heavily indebted to Montgomery County, Md., chiropractor Dr. Alan Cornfield. Montgomery County (Md.) Circuit Court documents revealed Badu's debts to be 300,000. Badu and Cornfield met through Cornfield's connections to the Maryland basketball program, according to his lawyer Lewis Silber.

Apparently Mr. Badu and Dr. Cornfield knew each other for a number of years, Silber said. There was something going on where Badu told Cornfield he could make him a lot of money.

Documents show that Cornfield filed a civil complaint against Badu on Dec. 10, 2010, with a litany of charges: breach of contract, fraud, misrepresentation of facts, unjust enrichment and restitution based upon unjust enrichment.

Silber went on to explain that Badu owed a lot of other people money as well, but the attorney said he was not at liberty to discuss those other people at this time.

Throughout the almost 18-month trial, Badu did not retain a lawyer. Silber added that Badu listed himself as self-employed when asked in court.

Silber last saw Badu on Friday, Sept. 21, in a court room. As part of a payment plan to repay the 300,000, Badu wrote a 20,000 check. That check bounced.

Badu pleaded guilty to writing the bad check, and was sentenced last Friday, according to the Montgomery County Circuit Court Criminal Department. The former Maryland player was due to serve a five-year suspended sentence with three years supervised probation for the bad check charge.

Im not sure where the money went, Silber said. We ended up going to court, and he agreed to pay the money back. In the process of doing so he wrote a check that was not good.

Silber said that Badu asked for more time to make things work.

"It seemed like he was trying to figure things out, Silber said. He seemed that he believed it would be taken care of. As long as we kept pushing it off, another week, another week, it would work out.

Despite Badus requests for more time, Cornfield received no money.

We needed to see something. Nothing was going through, Silber said. Dr. Cornfield wanted his money back and this was the way legally we had to do it.

Calls to Cornfield's office were not immediately returned. What happens with Badus debt remains to be seen, Silber said, but the sadness of the situation did not escape the attorney.

I feel very bad for Mr. Badu, Silber said. I know his family.

Badu was 33 years old at the time of his death.

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VIDEO: Nats pull off first ever 3-3-5 triple play

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MLB.com

VIDEO: Nats pull off first ever 3-3-5 triple play

It's not often you see something in a baseball game that has never happened before, as the sport has been played for over 100 years.

On Friday night, however, the Nationals accomplished something that has never been done before.

In the eighth inning of their win over the Giants, the Nats pulled off a 3-3-5 triple play. 

It looked routine, but it was something that no baseball player has ever pulled off before:

That's just crazy.

[RELATED: Nats place C Jose Lobaton on disabled list]

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Triple play helps Nationals hold off Giants 4-1

Triple play helps Nationals hold off Giants 4-1

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The Washington Nationals made history by turning the first 3-3-5 triple play ever in the major leagues then watched as third baseman Anthony Rendon tossed the ball from the milestone moment into the crowd at AT&T Park.

Getting a second straight win over the Giants and securing their hold on the second-best record in baseball was far more important than the souvenir to manager Dusty Baker and his ballclub.

Washington turned the first triple play in its 12-season history, holding on in the eighth inning to help preserve a strong outing by Max Scherzer and beat San Francisco 4-1 on Friday night.

"Crazy," Zimmerman said. "Couldn't have happened at a better time for us. Great job by Sammy (Solis) coming in and getting two pitches and three outs."

The Giants loaded the bases in the eighth with two walks sandwiched around a single. Brandon Crawford then lined an 0-1 pitch from Sammy Solis to first baseman Ryan Zimmerman, who had entered the game moments earlier as a part of a double switch.

Zimmerman quickly stepped on first base for the second out then threw to third baseman Anthony Rendon to catch Denard Span to complete the triple play.

"Once I caught it I knew I had the double play," said Zimmerman, who was moved a few steps back before Crawford swung. "Then Tony was jumping up and down with a smile on his face so I just tossed the ball over to him. Got out of a jam just like that."

It was the first 3-3-5 triple play in history, according to Sabr.org, and alos the first Baker has ever seen as a player or manager.

"There was one other one but I went to the bathroom and missed it," Baker said.

Scherzer (11-6) had lost four of his five career starts against the Giants and a no-decision in Game 4 of the 2012 World Series before holding San Francisco to one run over seven innings.

The four-time All-Star retired 14 of the final 16 batters he faced and finished with six strikeouts and two walks.

Over his last six starts Scherzer has allowed just five earned runs in 41 1/3 innings.

"Once we got that lead he knows how to smell the finish line," Baker said. "Max was awesome."

Four relievers combined to retire eight batters.

Four players had two hits apiece for the Giants. San Francisco fell to 2-11 since the All-Star break.

San Francisco put two runners on base in the ninth but Shawn Kelly struck out Eduardo Nunez -- making his Giants debut -- for his sixth save.

"We're just having a hard time getting runners in," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. "It's a tough go but you have to be big boys and come out here and put your big boy pants on and keep fighting. That's all you can do."

Jayson Werth had two hits for the Nationals to extend his on-base streak to 32 games, tied with Boston's Dustin Pedroia for the longest active streak in the majors, and Ben Revere hit a tiebreaking single in the fifth.

Daniel Murphy added an RBI triple while Wilson Ramos doubled and scored to help the Nationals win their second straight in this four-game series between division leaders.

All of Washington's runs came off Giants starter Jeff Samardzija (9-7).

FAN CHARGES FIELD

The game was interrupted in the top of the seventh inning when a fan ran onto the field. The man avoided security guards for a few moments then dropped to one knee near Giants SS Crawford before being tackled and escorted away.

TRAINER' S ROOM

Nationals: Backup C Jose Lobaton was placed on the 15-day disabled list with left elbow tendinitis. The move is retroactive to July 20. ... Pedro Severino was called up from Triple-A Syracuse.

Giants: Nunez, obtained a day earlier in a trade from Minnesota, was added to the 25-man roster and was in uniform. To make room, OF Jarrett Parker was optioned down to Triple-A Sacramento. ... 3B Matt Duffy (left Achilles strain) took infield and ran the bases before the game in anticipation of beginning a rehab assignment.

UP NEXT

Nationals: RHP Reynaldo Lopez (0-1) will be called up from Syracuse to face San Francisco on Saturday. Lopez lost in his major league debut against the Dodgers on July 19.

Giants: RHP Jake Peavy (5-9) will make his 14th career start against the Nationals franchise. Peavy's first came during his rookie season of 2002 against the then-Montreal Expos.

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Gausman allows three first-inning home runs in 6-5 loss

Gausman allows three first-inning home runs in 6-5 loss

Blue Jays 6, Orioles 5

Winner-Estrada (6-4)
Loser-Gausman (2-8)
Save-Osuna (21)

WHAT WENT RIGHT: The Orioles scored five runs, equaling their most since the All-Star break. They haven’t scored six or more since July 6.

WHAT WENT WRONG: Kevin Gausman allowed three home runs in the first inning to Jose Bautista, Edwin Encarnacion and Troy Tulowitzki. 

The Orioles (58-44) lost for the fourth straight time and have just a half-game lead over Toronto (58-45). 

HUSTLE RUN: Manny Machado scored all the way from first base on an infield out by Chris Davis in the third. Machado, who had taken second, decided to sprint for third, which wasn’t covered. He beat the throw, and Toronto catcher Russell Martin, who was near third, made an error, allowing Machado to score.

NOT KING OF THE ROAD: Not only is Gausman nearing the second anniversary of his last road win, but he had travel issues getting to Toronto. 

Gausman was left back in Baltimore on Wednesday night when the Orioles flew to Minnesota for a one-game makeup. His Thursday flight to Toronto was cancelled, so he flew to Detroit and drove from there. 

UNHAPPY WIETERS: Matt Wieters growled at home plate umpire Manny Gonzalez when he objected to a called strike in the eighth inning. Buck Showalter ran out to intercede. 

Wieters has been ejected twice in his major league career. Both have come in games against Toronto. 

VANIMAL HELPS: Vance Worley allowed just one hit in four scoreless innings following Gausman. 

BUNTING FOR KIM: Hyun Soo Kim bunted for a base hit in the first inning. 

UP NEXT: Yovani Gallardo (3-2, 5.37) faces J.A. Happ (13-3, 3.27) on Saturday at 1:07 p.m. 

The Orioles must win to maintain their AL East lead. 

RELATED: J.J. HARDY HAS BEEN SCORCHING THIS MONTH