Tragic end for former Maryland basketball player


Tragic end for former Maryland basketball player

By JP Finlay

Former Maryland basketball player Earl Badu died from an apparent suicide on Sept. 27, Baltimore County Police officials confirmed on Sept. 28.

Badu apparently jumped from an eastern Baltimore County overpass on I-95 and dropped some 50 feet before landing on I-695, according to reports. Medical personnel transported Badu to Johns Hopkins Bayview, where he was pronounced dead.

A fan favorite during his time in College Park, Badu was a walk-on player for the Maryland team that won the national championship in 2002. Badu, a Baltimore native, found himself in legal and financial trouble in the years preceding his death.

At the time of his death, Badu was heavily indebted to Montgomery County, Md., chiropractor Dr. Alan Cornfield. Montgomery County (Md.) Circuit Court documents revealed Badu's debts to be 300,000. Badu and Cornfield met through Cornfield's connections to the Maryland basketball program, according to his lawyer Lewis Silber.

Apparently Mr. Badu and Dr. Cornfield knew each other for a number of years, Silber said. There was something going on where Badu told Cornfield he could make him a lot of money.

Documents show that Cornfield filed a civil complaint against Badu on Dec. 10, 2010, with a litany of charges: breach of contract, fraud, misrepresentation of facts, unjust enrichment and restitution based upon unjust enrichment.

Silber went on to explain that Badu owed a lot of other people money as well, but the attorney said he was not at liberty to discuss those other people at this time.

Throughout the almost 18-month trial, Badu did not retain a lawyer. Silber added that Badu listed himself as self-employed when asked in court.

Silber last saw Badu on Friday, Sept. 21, in a court room. As part of a payment plan to repay the 300,000, Badu wrote a 20,000 check. That check bounced.

Badu pleaded guilty to writing the bad check, and was sentenced last Friday, according to the Montgomery County Circuit Court Criminal Department. The former Maryland player was due to serve a five-year suspended sentence with three years supervised probation for the bad check charge.

Im not sure where the money went, Silber said. We ended up going to court, and he agreed to pay the money back. In the process of doing so he wrote a check that was not good.

Silber said that Badu asked for more time to make things work.

"It seemed like he was trying to figure things out, Silber said. He seemed that he believed it would be taken care of. As long as we kept pushing it off, another week, another week, it would work out.

Despite Badus requests for more time, Cornfield received no money.

We needed to see something. Nothing was going through, Silber said. Dr. Cornfield wanted his money back and this was the way legally we had to do it.

Calls to Cornfield's office were not immediately returned. What happens with Badus debt remains to be seen, Silber said, but the sadness of the situation did not escape the attorney.

I feel very bad for Mr. Badu, Silber said. I know his family.

Badu was 33 years old at the time of his death.

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Daniel Winnik loses part of his ear after taking puck to the head

Daniel Winnik loses part of his ear after taking puck to the head

There was a scary moment for Daniel Winnik in the Caps' 4-2 win over the Florida Panthers on Thursday.

With the Caps clinging to a one-goal lead in the third period, Winnik went for the shot block but mistimed his dive. As his momentum carried his body, the shot ended up hitting him in the side of the head as he turned to try and protect his face.

Winnik stayed down for several seconds but was able to skate off under his own power. He even returned to the ice several minutes later and finished the game.

Following the game, head coach Barry Trotz provided an update.

"Trainers looked at him, he was just fine, he's missing a piece of his ear."

Trotz followed that by saying, "It's just a small piece."

Oh, well that's no big deal then. You can see Trotz's full comments in the video above.

There are moments in hockey that always make you realize how tough these guys are. Losing a part of your ear after taking a puck to the head? Yeah, that qualifies.

RELATED: Caps earn first road win of the season with victory over Panthers

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New #RedskinsTalk Podcast - Duke Ihenacho opens up about playing time and Mexican food

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New #RedskinsTalk Podcast - Duke Ihenacho opens up about playing time and Mexican food

On the latest episode of #RedskinsTalk The Podcast, safety Duke Ihenacho opens up about injuries and playing time - and his love of Mexican food. 

Click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes or press play below.

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