Top ten women's majors

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Top ten women's majors

By Leonard Shapiro
CSNwashington.com

With Na Yeon Choi prevailing in the U.S. Womens Open by fourshots Sunday in Kohler, Wisc., it marked the fourth time in the last five years a South Korean has won Americas national championship of golf. The LPGA almost always has taken a backseat to the PGA Tour in terms of crowds, purses and television ratings. But the women definitely have produced more than their share of bright and shining stars as well as some of the more riveting moments in golf history, particularly in the major championships. Heres a list of our all-time top ten performances.

10. Rocky Mountain High. She gave herself the nickname Birdie to distinguish herself from all the other South Korean Kims on the LPGA Tour, and the 23-year-old certainly lived up to her name in the 2005 U.S. Womens Open. At Cherry Hills in the Denver suburbs, Kim holed out from a bunker 30 yards from the cup for one last birdie, just enough to hold off two teenage amateurs, 17-year-old Morgan Pressel and 19-year-old Brittany Lang, by two shots.

9. Jewel for Julie. In suffocating Mississippi summer heat and humidity, 38-year-old Julie Inkster, who had been contemplating giving up the tour, blossomed into a dominating champion of the 1999 U.S. Womens Open at Old Waverly Country Club. She ended five shots ahead of runner-up Sherri Turner, and her 16-under par total of 272 shattered the tournament record for lowest score relative to par by six shots. So much for early retirement.

8. Slam Dunk. Karrie Webb holed out from 116 yards for an improbable eagle on the 72nd hole at the 2006 Kraft-Nabisco Championship, a stroke of genius that got her into a playoff against Lorena Ochoa, who also eagled the final hole with a clutch 12-foot putt. Webb wasted no time in the playoff, draining a six-footer for birdie at the 18th to claim her seventh major title with a final round 65. Of course she took the traditional dive into the pond near the final green shortly thereafter, no doubt employing the Australian crawl.

7. Viva Lorena. Frustrated by constantly being asked when she was going to win her first major championship, Lorena Ochoa went to St. Andrews, the home of golf, to do something about it in the summer of 2007. With an opening round 67, the then No. 1 ranked player in the world took the lead after nine holes and never looked back, winning by four shots in a week of typical Scottish wind and spitting rain. This is the most special round of golf I have ever played, said the native of Mexico after her final day 74 in atrocious conditions.

6. Major Breakthrough. With three straight birdies in the middle of her final round, Annika Sorenstam opened a three-shot lead in the 1995 U.S. Womens Open and held on for the first professional victory of her Hall of Fame career. She had to hold off a couple of fast-closing Hall of FamersPat Bradley and Betsy Kingand won by a stroke over Meg Mallon, who missed a 20-foot birdie putt at the 18th. It was clearly the start of something very big for Sorenstam, who posted a final round 68 that day at the Broadmoor East course in Colorado Springs.

5. Rookie on a Roll. It was never really close at the 1978 LPGA Championship contested at the Jack Nicklaus Golf Club in Kings Island, Ohio. Nancy Lopez, in her rookie season, won by six shots over her closest pursuer, Amy Alcott, for the first of her three LPGA major championships, and her only major victories. Lopez, only 21, won nine times that season, including five in a row and earned Player of The Year honors. Said Hall of Famer Mickey Wright that week, Never in my life have I seen such control in someone so young.

4. Korean Invasion. Playing in her first major championship in her first season on the LPGA Tour, unknown 20-year-old South Korean Se Ri Pak went wire-to-wire to capture the McDonalds LPGA Championship at DuPont Country Club in Wilmington, Delaware. Pak won by three shots, but far more significant, her victories there and at the U.S. Womens Open a month later helped ignite an explosion back home in womens golf that has resulted in more than 40 Korean players now competing on the LPGA Tour, and more than 40 on the Futures circuit, as well. Ask any of the young Korean players, including Choi, to name their hero growing up, and most will say Hall of Famer Se Ri Pak.

3. Little Patty. Itty-bitty Patty Berg was a giant in womens golf in the 1940s and 50s, winning a record 15 major championships, including the 1946 U.S. Womens Open conducted by the short-lived Womens Professional Golf Association. That was replaced in 1950 by the LPGA, and in 1953, the U.S. Golf Association began running the Open. That first Open in 46 at the Spokane Country Club was decided in a 36-hole match-play format after 36 holes of qualifying by stroke play. Berg won the qualifying medal with rounds of 72 and 73 and beat Betty Jamison, 5 and 4, in the 36-hole final. She collected 19,700 for her efforts.

2. The Wright Stuff. In the 1954 Womens Open, 19-year-old amateur Mickey Wright was paired with the great Babe Zaharias and made a huge splash by finishing fourth. Four years later at Forest Lake Country Club in Detroit, she prevailed over another LPGA founder, Louise Suggs, by five shots to win the first of her record four Open titles among her 13 major championships, second only to Berg. Her 82 career victories trail only the 88 posted by Kathy Whitworth. She earned 7,200 from the Scrooges at the USGA, who sliced Open purses dramatically when they took over the event in 53.

1. What a Babe. Perhaps the greatest female athlete of all time, Babe Didrikson Zaharias came to golf later in an athletic life dominated mostly by basketball and track and field. At the suggestion of famed sportswriter Grantland Rice, Zaharias decided to focus on the sport, and was a quick study. Her victory in the 1954 U.S. Womens Open at Salem Country Club in Peabody, Massachusetts was among the most inspirational triumphs in sports history. Only months after her first surgery for cancer, Zaharias won the Open by an astounding 12 shots over Betty Hicks, the second greatest margin of victory in tournament annals. Two years later, she died from cancer at the age of 45, with ten career major titles (four as an amateur) and 41 career wins. Her career winnings: 66,237.

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5 must-see moments from Wizards' win over Atlanta Hawks

5 must-see moments from Wizards' win over Atlanta Hawks

Here are five plays or moments from the Washington Wizards' 104-100 win over the Atlanta Hawks at the Verizon Center on Wednesday night that are worth revisiting...

1. The first half of this game was hideous on all accounts. The Wizards scored just 16 points in the first quarter and had 40 at halftime. John Wall went scoreless and the Wizards shot 34 percet as a team.

Basically, there wasn't much to highlight through the first two quarters. But there was this three by Bojan Bogdanovic to beat the shot clock buzzer:

Bogdanovic ended up with just five points in 15 minutes.

2. The second half is where all the fun started and the Wizards had some life breathed into them by their bench. In this sequence Kelly Oubre, Jr. and Brandon Jennings combined to key a 5-point rally and give the Wizards a lead:

Oubre was solid with five points and five rebounds in 18 minutes. Jennings got it done again with six assists.

3. The fourth quarter was all Wall and Bradley Beal, who combined for 18 points in the frame. On this play Wall found Beal for a three and used a nifty dribble fake to set up the assist, one of 10 for him on the night:

Did you notice Oubre on the bench? Take another look:

4. On this play Wall found himself wide open on the fastbreak. He threw it down with emphasis:

Wall had 22 points on the night after putting up a zero in the first.

5. Beal helped put the finishing touches on this win with a huge defensive play. He stole a pass and flushed it on the other end:

Beal led the Wizards with 28 points, including four threes, and added nine rebounds. It was a strong night for Big Panda and afterwards he caught up with CSN's Chris Miller, only to have Jason Smith then mess with him during the interview:

As Beal said afterwards, the Wizards have their swag back.

[RELATED: Wizards' Brooks has little sympathy in NBA rest debate]

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Game 73: Capitals vs. Blue Jackets date, time, how to watch, game thread

Game 73: Capitals vs. Blue Jackets date, time, how to watch, game thread

Washington defeated the hottest team in the NHL on Tuesday with a win over the Calgary Flames, but the Capitals face an even bigger matchup on Thursday as they host the Columbus Blue Jackets. Columbus and the Caps are fighting for the top of the division to avoid a tougher first-round matchup in the playoffs. Kevin Shattenkirk will enter Thursday's game looking for his first goal as a Cap after his goal on Tuesday was reviewed and given to Nicklas Backstrom. Alex Ovechkin, meanwhile, will be sporting some special skates in honor of Russian Heritage Night.

What: Washington Capitals vs. Columbus Blue Jackets

Where: Verizon Center, Washington, D.C.

When: 7:00 p.m. ET. (Capitals GameTime gets things started at 6:30 p.m. ET)

How to Watch: Capitals vs. Blue Jackets will be broadcast on CSN. (Channel Finder)

Live Stream: You can watch the Capitals vs. Blue Jackets game on CSN's live stream page.

WHEN IS THE CAPITALS-BLUE JACKETS GAME?

The Capitals (47-17-8) take on the Blue Jackets (47-19-6) Thursday, March 23 at 7:00 p.m. ET at Verizon Center.

WHAT CHANNEL IS THE CAPITALS-BLUES JACKETS GAME ON?

The Capitals-Blue Jackets game will be broadcast on CSN. Capitals GameTime gets things started at 6:30 p.m. ET with Capitals Extra recapping the all the action following the game and Caps in 30 at 11 p.m. (CSN channel Finder)

WHERE CAN I STREAM THE CAPITALS-BLUE JACKETS GAME?

The Capitals-Blue Jackets game, as well as the pre and postgame shows, is available to stream live here through CSN's live stream page and is available to authenticated CSN Mid-Atlantic subscribers on desktops, tablets, mobile devices and connected TVs anywhere in the United States.

WHAT ARE THE LINES FOR THE CAPITALS-BLUE JACKETS GAME?

Here are the projected lines based on Tuesday's game:

Forwards
Alex Ovechkin - Nicklas Backstrom - T.J. Oshie
Marcus Johansson - Evgeny Kuznetsov - Justin Williams
Brett Connolly - Lars Eller - Andre Burakovsky
Daniel Winnik - Jay Beagle - Tom Wilson

Defense

Karl Alzner - John Carlson
Dmitry Orlov - Matt Niskanen
Brooks Orpik - Kevin Shattenkirk

Goalies
Braden Holtby starts with Philipp Grubauer as backup

Scratches
Nate Schmidt, Taylor Chorney

CAPITALS-BLUE JACKETS OPEN THREAD

Use the comment section below to discuss the game action with other Capitals fans. 

For all the latest Caps coverage, follow Capitals Insider Tarik El-Bashir, Capitals Digital Producer JJ Regan and the CSN Capitals account on Twitter. Be sure check out our Capitals page and CSN's Facebook page.

Keep up with all the action here with Capitals GameZone and join in on the conversation here with Capitals Pulse.