Tom Coughlin is not happy with Pierre-Paul video

848989.jpg

Tom Coughlin is not happy with Pierre-Paul video

From Comcast SportsNet
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) -- Tom Coughlin talked about the usual pros and cons after watching the video of the Giants' preseason win over the Jets, and the report on injuries to running back Ahmad Bradshaw and rookie cornerback Jayron Hosley seemed OK. What the Giants coach had a problem with Sunday was a video of Pro Bowl defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul throwing second-year cornerback Prince Amukamara into an ice bath at training camp at the University at Albany. It was tweeted by punter Steve Weatherford before Saturday's 26-3 win over the Jets, and it contains some inappropriate language. The incident also could be considered either hazing -- although that's odd for a second-year player -- or even bullying. Some might explain it as camp bonding, but Amukamara doesn't look amused. Neither was Coughlin. "I'm learning about that today," Coughlin said. "I really didn't have any information about that until maybe an hour ago, an hour before this conference call. I'm going to look into it; I'm going to talk to the parties involved." It was not clear whether Coughlin had seen the video of Pierre-Paul carrying a non-resistant Amukamara through a hallway as teammates followed, some shouting inappropriate comments. Once Pierre-Paul reaches the ice tubs he seems to fling Amukamara into the water. The cornerback gets out of the water quickly but the look on his face suggests he is upset. "Anything that occurs within this family or within our group should not be a part of any social media aspect," Coughlin said. "I'm going to address that strongly, and I've spent a little time on that this preseason, but I'll look into it further." Giants players were off Sunday. Amukamara told the Star-Ledger of Newark after the game that he was confused getting thrown into the bath since he was no longer a rookie, but he said: "I know it's all love. Yeah, no one ever likes it, especially when it's you vs. eight and no one's helping you. But it doesn't mess up our team morale or anything." While the video attracted the most attention Sunday, the good news for the Super Bowl champions (No. 3 in the AP Pro32) was that Bradshaw seemingly has only a bruised right hand after it hit a helmet and popped a cyst on his hand in the process. Hosley, who made the biggest play of the game returning a second-quarter interception 77 yards for a touchdown, has a case of turf toe on his right foot. It was in a cast after the game. "Hopefully nothing will turn up in terms of all the tests, and then it's going to be something that is going to be very sore," Coughlin said. "There's no doubt. How he is able to deal with it will indicate how fast he can get back on the practice field." Hosley was on the field for only seven plays. The third-round draft pick out of Virginia Tech did not know on which play he was hurt. If there was an area of concern for the Giants, it was their running game, which finished last in the league in 2011. They gained 58 yards on 32 carries, a horrible 1.8-yard average. Coughlin said the Jets used a lot of fronts, more than he expected for a preseason game. "That's going to be very helpful," Coughlin said. "I didn't like it, a lot of it, and we certainly had our share of mistakes, and our second and third guys were kind of swimming a little bit. But I don't think there's any question about the value of it. Having experienced it this early in the season, the benefit will be going forward." Coughlin was not sure how long linebacker Mark Herzlich (hip pointer) and defensive end Adrian Tracy (minor hamstring) would be sidelined.

Quick Links

Pressure Points: New position should lead to more playmaking from Su'a Cravens

Pressure Points: New position should lead to more playmaking from Su'a Cravens

In the weeks leading up to training camp, Redskins Insider JP Finlay will look at specific people facing increased pressure for the 2017 season. 

Pressure Point: Strong safety Su'a Cravens

Cravens flashed his playmaking ability in spots during 2016, but finding the right position and injuries stunted his impact as a rookie. He lost time early in the year to a concussion against the Browns and then saw his season cut short after an arm injury in December in Philadelphia. 

Injuries can't be planned on, but in 2017, the position issue should be solved.

Cravens looks poised to open the season starting alongside D.J. Swearinger in the Redskins secondary. The rebuilt safety duo could go a long way towards an improved Redskins defense.

Swearinger established himself as a quality starter last year playing with the Cardinals. Pro Football Focus rated him the No. 8 safety in the NFL. For Cravens, however, this is the year to establish himself.

ROSTER BATTLES: Left guard | Tight end Nickel cornerback  | Inside linebacker | Running back

So far, Redskins coach Jay Gruden likes Cravens' developement.

"He’s doing a great job. We’re happy with his progress," Gruden said in June. "I think just the more he plays, the better he’s going to get. The more he can just go practice and watch himself on tape and watch his eye progression and his angles, that’s just going to be huge for him because he continues to develop."

One of the reasons he slipped out of the first round in the 2016 Draft was because of speed. At his USC Pro Day, he ran a 4.69. Is Cravens fast enough to play safety in the NFL? 

His 40 time might not suggest it, but the Washington secondary is not full of burners anyway. In fact, linebacker Zach Brown's 4.50 40 time at the NFL Combine was faster than any of the Redskins projected secondary (Cravens, Swearinger, Josh Norman or Bashaud Breeand). The Redskins coaches think proper positioning and communication will account for any lack of speed in their defensive backfield. 

In college at USC, Cravens played mostly safety but showed he could line up all over the field. In Washington last season, he played almost exclusively interior linebacker, mostly in dime and nickel situations.

He produced, 23 tackles and an interception in 11 games, but it seemed clear to all parties he was better suited for the secondary. Asked about Cravens late last season, one Redskins player said simply, "Su'a is a safety."

This year, Su'a is a safety.

Week 3 as a rookie, Cravens made arguably the most important play of the Redskins season, intercepting Eli Manning to secure the team's first win of the year. That pick showed exactly why the Redskins drafted Cravens. He was tight in coverage and made a leaping, athletic play on the ball to force the turnover.

As a strong safety, Cravens will inch up towards the box on plenty of snaps and will rarely, if ever, be wholly responsible for deep middle coverage. That should mean plenty more opportunities to make plays like he did in Giants Stadium. The pressure is on.

<<<NFL POWER RANKINGS: WHO GOT BETTER AFTER THE DRAFT>>>

Want more Redskins? Click here to follow JP on Facebook and check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates via Twitter! Click here for the #RedskinsTalk on Apple Podcasts, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

Quick Links

NFL Shop sold license plate with Redskins logo over outline of Washington ... state

NFL Shop sold license plate with Redskins logo over outline of Washington ... state

Let's just get this out of the way: The Washington Redskins represent Washington, D.C., not Washington state. 

Duh, everyone knows that, you might think. But you'd be wrong. 

Wrong like this "state pride" license plate sold on NFLShop.com until this morning. 

The plates are manufactured by a company called Stockdale Technologies and feature team logos over outlines of their home states. 

The Ravens plate, for example, is on a purple background with the state of Maryland outlined in gold behind the logo.

The Redskins version, however, places the team's logo over the state of Washington ... on the other side of the country from Washington, D.C. 

MORE REDSKINS: Would Cousins give the Redskins a discount like Oshie gave the Caps?

The embarrassing error was first reported by The Washington Post's Dan Steinberg, who ordered the license plate before the NFL Shop removed the product from its online store.

The worst part of the whole episode was Steinberg's discovery that the Washington state confusion was hardly an isolated incident. 

In fact, Steinberg dug up a number of recent tweets from people who thought the Redskins represented Washington state. Some even thought that about other D.C. teams. 

How many of these people actually know that Washington, D.C. is not in Washington state? Or that it's not technically a state?