Strange reason why pitcher was ejected in DC

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Strange reason why pitcher was ejected in DC

From Comcast SportsNet
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Even without throwing a pitch, Tampa Bay's Joel Peralta left his mark on the game. The reliever was ejected in the Rays' 5-4 victory Tuesday night when Washington manager Davey Johnson asked the umpires to check Peralta's glove while the pitcher was warming up in the eighth inning. The check found "a significant amount of pine tar," according to crew chief Tim Tschida. The umpires carried the glove off the field and tossed Peralta. As the reliever walked off the field, he tipped his cap to the Nationals dugout. "Good for them," Peralta said. "They still lose the game." Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon was clearly upset with the umpires on the field, and afterward he called Johnson "cowardly" for requesting the check of the reliever who pitched for the Nationals in 2010. "Insider trading, man. It's bush," Maddon said. "It's bogus. That's way too easy, right there." Peralta did not directly answer when asked if he intentionally added pine tar to the glove. "That's a glove that I use for batting practice every day," he said. "I'm every day playing catch with it, it's hot here -- that's all I'm going to say about it." Jake McGee filled in and pitched a perfect eighth for the Rays, and Fernando Rodney pitched the ninth inning for his 20th save. "If somebody has been known to use a foreign substance on their glove or their hat, a nice hot night is the time to use it, so I asked them to check and obviously he had it," Johnson said. "It was a rumor that he liked a little pine tar." Maddon didn't deny there was pine tar on Peralta's glove, but he termed it a "common practice." "Joel is using pine tar and had pine tar in his glove," Maddon said. "I'm saying to suggest he's the only one that's doing it is inappropriate." After Peralta's ejection, Tschida told Maddon he could request a check of one Nationals player in reponse. In the top of the ninth, Maddon asked the umpires to check Nationals reliever Ryan Mattheus, but no foreign substance was found. The ejection took the spotlight from David Price (9-4), who bounced back from his worst start of the season. He gave up four runs on six hits, struck out four and walked one. His last time out against the Mets, Price gave up seven runs in five innings. "It was big for me," Price said. "It was good for our confidence and it was good for my confidence as well." The only real blemish on Price's night were a pair of home runs. Ian Desmond hit his career-best 11th in the third and Michael Morse hit his first homer of the season -- a two-run shot in the sixth. It wasn't enough for the Nationals, who lost their fourth in a row, one shy of their season-long slide. Washington starter Chien-Ming Wang (2-3) struggled from the start. He gave up singles to the game's first three batters, with the third by B.J. Upton scoring the Rays' first run. The Nationals tied the game in the bottom of the inning. Morse grounded to third with two outs, but Carlos Pena at first base couldn't handle the bounced throw from Will Ryhmes and Ryan Zimmerman scored on the error. Tampa Bay broke the game open with four runs in the third, kicked off by Pena's two-run homer to center. With two outs and two on Elliot Johnson nearly outdid Pena, missing a homer to the left-center gap by about a foot. Instead, he ended up with a two-run triple. Wang was pulled in the fourth inning after giving up five runs on seven hits. Reliever Ross Detwiler -- who opened the year as the Nationals' fifth starter -- came on and retired the first nine batters he faced before hitting Pena on the elbow in the seventh. That was the only baserunner Detwiler allowed in 3 2-3 innings, striking out three. Tampa Bay hung on to win for the third time in four games, but after the game Maddon was more concerned about a possible stain on Peralta's reputation, and he believed the ejection would cause players on other teams to change their practices. "I promise you one thing," Maddon said, "you're going to see brand-new gloves throughout the major leagues starting tomorrow, with pitchers on every major league ball club." NOTES: Rays OF Matt Joyce left the game in the fifth inning with back tightness. ... Tampa Bay will place RHP Jeremy Hellickson on the 15-day DL and recall RHP Chris Archer from Triple-A Durham to start his major league debut Wednesday. ... The Rays recalled OF Rich Thompson from Durham. ... Nationals RHPs Henry Rodriguez (right index finger) and Cole Kimball (right shoulder) started rehab assignments Tuesday. Rodriguez pitched for Triple-A Syracuse, and Kimball's assignment was with the rookie-level Gulf Coast League affiliate. ... The Nationals will make up their postponed June 1 rainout with the Braves as part of a day-night doubleheader on July 21.

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Caps hold players-only meeting after Game 2 loss to say things 'that some people need to hear'

Caps hold players-only meeting after Game 2 loss to say things 'that some people need to hear'

As the media gathered outside the locker room of the Washington Capitals on Saturday night, they were met with closed doors and a lengthy wait. After a devastating 6-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game 2 of their second round series, clearly there were things that needed to be said, points that needed to be made behind closed doors.

The Caps gathered for a players-only meeting following the loss on Saturday. When the doors finally opened and the players did finally speak to reporters, clearly the emotions were raw and lips were sealed.

“None of your business,” Matt Niskanen said when asked what the message in the locker room was after the game.

“That stay between us,” Alex Ovechkin said.

RELATED: Holtby critical of his performance Saturday night

Some of the players were a bit more forthcoming, but details were still scarce. T.J. Oshie revealed that the overall message was “Things that people need to say and things that some people need to hear.”

“We were very together with what we said,” Oshie continued. “I don’t really need to go into details, but sometimes in our games and I’m sure in other sports as well, sometimes you need to hear from your teammates more than you need to hear from your coach.”

As the team was coming off the ice, Barry Trotz said that leaders on the team approached him about letting them speak to the team themselves.

“I think that's great,” Trotz said. “That's great leadership. That's ownership when your players are in the room talking about stuff because that's galvanizing. I think that's a huge step for us.”

The results will need to be seen soon, however, as the Caps are quickly running out of time with which to battle back in this series.

Washington jumped out to a strong start on Saturday, but was unable to capitalize in a scoreless first period. Things derailed after the opening frame as Pittsburgh took a 3-1 lead in the second and finished the Caps off with a strong third period to win the game 6-2.

Now the Caps face a daunting task of having to battle back from a 2-0 series deficit against their archrivals and defending Stanley Cup champions with the next two games in Pittsburgh. They will need to win both of those games to have a realistic chance of coming back in the series.

 “No one in here needs a lesson about how to go home early,” Oshie said. “We’ve done that. It’s well known, the fans know it, so we need to man up here and go into Game 3, change our attitude and have some fun while we do it.”

MORE CAPITALS: 3 observations: Missed opportunity leads to tough questions

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Morning tip: Wizards skip 'rivalry' chatter about Celtics, offer praise before Game 1

Morning tip: Wizards skip 'rivalry' chatter about Celtics, offer praise before Game 1

BOSTON -- Maybe it was because the Wizards just didn't have the energy after a grueling six-game series with the Atlanta Hawks, but all were measured and respectful in their words about their heated rival Boston Celtics before Game 1 tips today.

They had a light walkthrough on Saturday, less than 24 hours after a 115-99 road victory expelled the Atlanta Hawks from the postseason. 

"People want to call it a rivalry, whatever they want, it's not a rivalry," said John Wall, who got into a confrontation with Jae Crowder at TD Garden in January that led to both players being fined by the league office. "This is the first time we've played them in the playoffs."

They tied the season series at 2, with each team winning comfortably on their home floor but falling on the road. 

Wall was ejected from the first meeting at Verizon Center after a flagrant foul on Marcus Smart. Last season, Smart broke Bradley Beal's nose and gave him a concussion with a blow to the face.

"It's basketball," Beal said. "We're not fighting out here. I don't think that's either team's intention to. We both play hard. We both are competitive. We both want to win.  That's all it is. It's no dirty play out here from us and it's not going to be from them. We're going to keep it clean."

[RELATED: Keys to look for in Wizards-Celtics semifinal series]

The Hawks series got more testy than expected as Markieff Morris and Paul Millsap clashed after Game 1 won by the Wizards. In Friday's closeout game, Kent Bazemore shoved Beal after he had a transition dunk and was prone in the air that led to three technicals being issued.

"No," Morris said when asked if there was ill feelings between the Wizards and Celtics. "Teams argue all the time. I wouldn't say there's bad blood. I'm good friends with Gerald Green."

Brooks was visibly upset after a 117-108 loss here on Jan. 18, when Crowder poked Wall in the nose with his index finger only to get slapped on the chin. The Celtics were only called for 10 total team fouls in a game that was loosely officiated. The Wizards only were called for 13. 

Two weeks later, the Wizards wore all black in a Funeral Game to bury the Celitcs. They routed them 123-108 in D.C. 

Brooks is past that blip on the radar of a 49-win season that has put the Wizards in the conference semifinals for the third time in four years. It's Brooks first season in Washington. 

"I think both teams play hard. I have no problem playing hard," he said. "The rivalry, I don't know if it's a rivalry. When is the last time the teams played in the playoffs?"

[RELATED: A rundown of the history between Wizards and Celtics]