Star defenseman signs huge offer sheet with Flyers

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Star defenseman signs huge offer sheet with Flyers

From Comcast SportsNet
PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- A person with knowledge of the decision says the Philadelphia Flyers have signed Nashville star defenseman Shea Weber to a 14-year offer sheet worth more than 100 million. The Sports Network in Canada first reported the offer. The person spoke to The Associated Press on Thursday on condition of anonymity because the Flyers hadn't announced the offer. Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren confirmed early Thursday that the Flyers did sign Weber to an offer sheet. He gave no further details. Predators part owner W. Brett Wilson posted on Twitter, "Am aware of Philly offer." Weber, 26, is the Predators' captain and played on a 7.5 million arbitrator's award last season. He had 19 goals and 49 points along the way. The team has seven days to match the offer. Nashville already lost free-agent defenseman Ryan Suter to Minnesota this summer, and losing Weber would be an unexpected blow to a defense-first team that had 104 points last season, took the No. 4 seed in the Western Conference and advanced to the second round of the playoffs. Meanwhile, Weber would fill the void left by Philadelphia defenseman Chris Pronger's absence. Pronger -- a key cog in the Flyers' run to the 2010 Stanley Cup finals -- has been battling concussion problems and missed most of last season. He finished with one goal in 13 games as the Flyers bowed out in the second round to New Jersey after a promising, 103-point regular season. The Flyers were exposed on defense in a five-game, Round 2 loss to New Jersey, and since have lost defenseman Matt Carle, who snared a six-year, 33 million deal with Tampa Bay. Weber would fix a lot of those problems.

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Kevin Durant says don't blame him for lopsided NBA Playoffs

Kevin Durant says don't blame him for lopsided NBA Playoffs

Basketball fans got what they wanted with an NBA Finals rematch between LeBron James' Cleveland Cavaliers and the Golden State Warriors, but the road to get there was mostly a snore. As Dan Feldman of ProBasketballTalk broke down on Friday, the NBA Playoffs so far have been historically lopsided.

Cavs-Warriors was not only a foregone conclusion, but their dominance through the first three rounds contributed to the fewest pre-Finals games since the NBA expanded the first round to seven games. And by average win margin, it also ranked among the least competitive playoffs ever.

Part of that, one could argue, is due to Kevin Durant joining the Warriors. In doing so, he depleted the Oklahoma City Thunder, who were one of the league's best teams, and consolidated power on the Warriors. They have four stars between Durant, Steph Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green when a lot of teams around the NBA have zero.

Durant shouldn't be blamed for all of it, of course. James joining the Cavs and teaming up with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love had its domino effect. And a lot of teams just plain stink.

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Durant issued a strong defense of himself in that regard. He thinks it's unwarranted to say he's the biggest reason. Here is what he told USA Today Sports:

“Like I'm the reason why (expletive) Orlando couldn't make the playoffs for five, six years in a row?” he said. “Am I the reason that Brooklyn gave all their picks to Boston? Like, am I the reason that they're not that good (laughs)? I can't play for every team, so the truth of the matter is I left one team. It's one more team that you probably would've thought would've been a contender. One more team. I couldn't have made the (entire) East better. I couldn't have made everybody (else) in the West better.”

He's right about the Magic and Nets. Yikes, are they terrible. But him leaving OKC did remove one of the best potential matchups in the NBA Playoffs. Their seven-game series against the Warriors last summer was a memorable one and we'll never see it again.

Whether Durant is to blame or not, the playoffs have been anything but great. Ironically, the Wizards' two series against the Hawks and Celtics were probably the best, or at least the most eventful.

[RELATED: JaVale McGee and his cat have a funny story to tell]

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Dmitry Orlov in talks with KHL team, why it doesn't mean anything

Dmitry Orlov in talks with KHL team, why it doesn't mean anything

Dmitry Orlov was given a prove it contract heading into the 2016-17 season and he did just that, providing the best season of his NHL career. It looks like the Capitals were not the only ones to take notice.

Orlov is in talks with KHL team CSKA, as Igor Eronko reports and the president of CSKA announced Friday. The Russian defenseman played in the KHL for Metallurg Novokuznetsk from 2008 to 2011 before heading to North America. His rights were traded to CSKA in 2013.

So what does this mean for the Caps? Absolutely nothing.

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These types of talks happen frequently between players and the KHL in the offseason and rarely does anything come of it.

The NHL and KHL have an agreement saying the leagues must honor each other’s contracts. As a restricted free agent, the Caps still own Orlov’s rights in the NHL, but that does not mean anything to CSKA. That makes this the perfect time for the team to try to convince Orlov to jump ship and return to Russia.

As far as the player is concerned, talking with the KHL is a bargaining chip to use when it comes time to negotiate a new contract in the NHL. Orlov does not have many cards to play as an RFA. Talking to CSKA is about the only leverage he has short of signing an offer sheet – which is considered taboo – and demanding a trade.

What also doesn’t help is the fact that the KHL is dealing with serious financial issues.

Remember Orlov’s first KHL team, Metallurg Novokuznetsk? Well, it is not in the KHL anymore. It was one of two teams removed from the league this offseason and KHL president Dmitry Chernyshenko has announced the league will remove another three teams after next season. He also revealed the league is dealing with over $17 million worth of wage delays to its players, some of whom have not been paid in over six months.

Orlov is poised to play on a top pair on a team in the best hockey league in the world. It seems unlikely he would abandon that opportunity after climbing the ranks from Hershey to the top of the Caps’ depth chart to go back home to a league dealing with financial delays and an uncertain future.

But if everyone knows these talks are for show, then why bother?

Two reasons. First, Orlov’s past two contracts were for two years and one year respectively. Negotiating his last deal dragged on throughout the summer until right before training camp was set to start. He will likely be looking for something a bit more long-term this go around. The second issue is the Olympics.

The NHL has announced that it will not be participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, something the players, especially the European ones, have taken issue with. Barring a reversal by the NHL, leaving for the KHL is about the only avenue Orlov would have to represent his native Russia.

But would that be enough to entice him to ignore the glaring problems with the KHL? That seems pretty doubtful.

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