Rolen's error gives Game 3 to the Giants

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Rolen's error gives Game 3 to the Giants

From Comcast SportsNetCINCINNATI (AP) -- Joaquin Arias hit a grounder toward third base and took off, covering those 90 feet in a blink as a full-to-capacity ballpark went silent with angst.Which would get there first, the infielder or the ball? Who would win the decisive playoff dash?"That's the fastest I've ever run to first," Arias said.Fast enough to extend the San Francisco Giants' season one more day.Reds third baseman Scott Rolen bobbled the short-hop, giving Arias enough time to beat the throw as the go-ahead run scored for a 2-1 victory Tuesday night that avoided an NL division series sweep.Hardly able to get a hit the last two games, the Giants turned a passed ball and a misplayed grounder into a win that cut their series deficit to 2-1 and extended Cincinnati's 17 years of home postseason futility."These are the type of games we've played all season long," said Sergio Romo, who pitched the last two innings for the win. "We are a gritty and grinding team."And, with their season on the line, a little lucky, too."We got a break there at the end," manager Bruce Bochy said.Left-hander Barry Zito will pitch Game 4 on Wednesday for the Giants, who have won the last 11 times he started. The Reds have to decide whether to try ace Johnny Cueto, forced out of the opener in San Francisco on Saturday with spasms in his back and side.Manager Dusty Baker said after the game that they hadn't decided whether to let Cueto try it, bring back Mat Latos on short rest again, or replace Cueto with Mike Leake, who wasn't on the division series roster.Switching out Cueto would leave the Reds ace ineligible to pitch in the championship series should the Reds get that far."It's very difficult, but it all depends on if your ace can't go or whatever it is," Baker said. "That's part of the conversation -- us going without him. We realize what's at stake."They were hoping to avoid having to make that choice. One grounder forced the issue.The Giants managed only three hits against Homer Bailey and the Reds bullpen, but got two of them in the 10th -- along with a passed ball by Ryan Hanigan -- to pull it out. San Francisco won despite striking out 16 times.Rolen, an eight-time Gold Glove winner, couldn't cleanly come up with Arias' grounder, which put him in a tough position."I've gone through the play many times in my mind between then and now, and I think I would play it the same way," Rolen said. "It hit my glove. I just couldn't get it to stick."The Reds haven't won a home playoff game since 1995, the last time they reached the NL championship series. One win away from making it back there, they couldn't beat a Giants team that has barely been able to get a hit.San Francisco got only two hits while losing 9-0 on Sunday night, setting up that 2-0 deficit in the series. The Giants had only one single in seven innings off Homer Bailey, making his first start at Great American Ball Park since his Sept. 28 no-hitter in Pittsburgh.Fortunately for the Giants, Bailey's one lapse led to a run. He hit a batter, walked another and gave up a sacrifice fly by Angel Pagan in the third inning.That was it until the 10th, with the Giants going down swinging -- the Reds set a season high with 16 strikeouts. Closer Aroldis Chapman got a pair of strikeouts on 100 mph fastballs during a perfect ninth inning, keeping it tied at 1.San Francisco's one-hit wonders finally got it going against Jonathan Broxton, who gave up leadoff singles by Buster Posey -- the NL batting champion -- and Hunter Pence, who pulled his left calf on a wild swing before getting his hit.With two outs, Hanigan couldn't come up with a pitch, letting the runners advance. Moments later, Cincinnati's chance for a sweep was over.Instead, a Reds team that lost a lot -- closer Ryan Madson in spring training, top hitter Joey Votto for six weeks at midseason, Baker for the NL Central clincher, Cueto in the first inning of the first playoff game -- ended up with another playoff loss at home.Baker was back in the home dugout at Great American for the first time in nearly a month, recovered from an irregular heartbeat and a mini-stroke. After a pregame ovation, he settled in his red folding chair with a toothpick on his lips.The 63-year-old manager watched his pitching staff dominate again, but fail to get that breakthrough win. This time, the offense came up short, getting only four hits.Cincinnati hasn't won a home playoff game since beating the Dodgers 10-1 at Riverfront Stadium for a three-game division sweep in the 1995 NLDS. They then got swept by Atlanta.They didn't get back to the playoffs again until 2010, when they got no-hit by Roy Halladay and swept by the Phillies in the opening round.The second-largest crowd in Great American history was still getting the hang of playoff rooting. A video board message instructed the 44,501 fans not to wave white rally towels while the Reds were in the field -- could be distracting.Didn't take long to get those towels twirling. Brandon Phillips led off with a single, but was thrown out at third when he tried to advance on a ball that got away from Posey. It was costly -- the Reds went on to score on a walk and a pair of singles, including Jay Bruce's RBI hit to right.The Reds got only one more hit the rest of the way.NOTES:The game started 3 minutes late because a sign-waving fan ran onto the field. He was tackled by police in center field. ... Giants avoided their third playoff sweep in franchise history. ... The Giants haven't lost three in a row since they dropped five straight from July 25-30. ... Tom Browning, who pitched the Reds' previous no-hitter -- a perfect game against the Dodgers in 1988 -- threw the ceremonial pitch. ... Bailey fanned six in a row, matching the Reds' postseason record. ... The only larger crowd at GABP was for the 2010 playoff game against Philadelphia.

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Carmelo Anthony on Knicks, Phil Jackson: 'I trust the process'

Carmelo Anthony on Knicks, Phil Jackson: 'I trust the process'

NEW YORK (AP) -- Carmelo Anthony had a half-season of clues about what Phil Jackson thought of him, and now it was his turn to evaluate his boss.

Anthony had trumpeted his trust in Jackson when he re-signed in 2014 and reaffirmed it months later, even as Jackson continued trading away key players from the best team Anthony ever played on in New York.

Reminded of that recently and asked if he still trusted Jackson, Anthony stopped well short.

"I trust the process," he said, mimicking Joel Embiid of the Philadelphia 76ers.

The process isn't going well for Jackson in New York.

The Knicks are 23-34, 12th in the Eastern Conference and on pace to miss the playoffs for the third time in Jackson's three full seasons as president of basketball operations. He's made his relationship with Anthony worse and hasn't made the Knicks better, and a guy who could do little wrong as a coach just can't get it right as an executive.

Maybe Jackson can swing a trade to fix things before Thursday's deadline.

Or maybe he'll just never fix the Knicks.

[RELATED: Report: Wizards interested in T'Wolves' forward]

If Jackson is planning anything, it remains a mystery. He hasn't spoken to reporters covering the Knicks since his preseason press conference in September -- backtracking from his vow to be accessible when he took the job -- and isn't expected to before the deadline. He has made only three postings on Twitter all season.

Yet he's still made plenty of noise.

He angered LeBron James by referring to his friends and business partners as a "posse" in an ESPN story . And he upset some of the league's other power players with his actions toward Anthony -- which could prove damaging when trying to lure free agents. Jackson has either appeared to endorse or refused to distance himself from articles criticizing his best player and has largely cut off communication between them -- after saying when he was hired that he planned to focus on "how players are treated" and "the kind of culture that's built."

Hall of Fame finalist Tracy McGrady told reporters this weekend he couldn't remain quiet the way Anthony has.

"I'm not going to let you disrespect (me) in the public's eye like that," McGrady said. "You're not going to be sending subliminal messages about me like that and I don't respond to that. I don't operate like that. I'm just not going to do it. And then you hide and don't do any media? You leave everything for me to talk about? Nah, that's not cool."

Jackson retains the support of Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan, who said in a recent ESPN Radio interview that he would not fire Jackson during the two-plus years that remain on his contract. (Both sides have an option to terminate the deal after this season).

Dolan didn't even express much disappointment in the results, even though the Knicks had their worst season ever in Jackson's first season and are 72-149 since the start of 2014-15.

"He was the best guy we thought we could find to run the New York Knicks," Dolan said.

Maybe if he'd been hiring Jackson to coach, as Jackson's 11 championships are a record for coaches. But there were questions about how he would do as an executive with no experience, and the answers haven't been good.

[RELATED: Porter isn't, and never has been, available for a trade]

He fired Mike Woodson and replaced him with first-time coach Derek Fisher, who lasted just 1 years. Starters Tyson Chandler and Raymond Felton were traded in one deal, and J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert left in another early the next season. They were all mainstays on the Knicks team that won 54 games and reached the second round of the playoffs not even two years before Jackson was hired in March 2014.

Now all that's left is Anthony, and it certainly seems Jackson wants him gone, too. He would have to find a workable deal, hard enough given the 32-year-old Anthony's salary and age, then get him to waive the no-trade clause he gave Anthony when he re-signed him.

If not, maybe Jackson himself would leave this summer -- though Dolan said he had no indication that was the 71-year-old Jackson's plan. But he insists he can't coach for health reasons and doesn't appear to enjoy scouting and dealing with agents, essential parts of his job.

He must be disheartened that the work he put into this team hasn't paid off. Jackson hired Jeff Hornacek to open up the offense after two years of his favored triangle, traded for Derrick Rose and signed free agents Joakim Noah, Courtney Lee and Brandon Jennings. None has sparked a turnaround, and drafting Kristaps Porzingis remains Jackson's only inarguable success.

Jackson played on the last championship Knicks team in 1973 and said when he was hired what it would mean to build another winner here.

"It would be a capstone on the remarkable career that I've had," Jackson said.

There's still time for that.

But these days, Anthony probably isn't the only one who no longer trusts in Jackson.

[RELATED: Lou Williams no longer a trade option for Wizards]

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Redskins offseason questions: Will they stick with Shawn Lauvao at left guard?

Redskins offseason questions: Will they stick with Shawn Lauvao at left guard?

The good news for the 2016 Redskins was that they didn’t collapse after winning the division the previous season as has been their pattern in the past. The bad news was that they didn’t take the next step and improve from a franchise that can compete to make the playoffs into one that is playing multiple postseason games year in and year out.

That work begins right now for Jay Gruden, Scot McCloughan and the players. In the coming weeks, Redskins reporters Rich Tandler and JP Finlay will examine the biggest questions facing the Redskins as another offseason gets rolling.

RELATED: #RedskinsTalk podcast: Is Kirk too nice?

Will the Redskins make a change at left guard?

Tandler: When looking at the key plays that were responsible for the Redskins missing the playoffs you don’t have to go too far down the list to find the one in Arizona when Calais Campbell blew over left guard Shawn Lauvao and hit Kirk Cousins for a sack-fumble that was critical in Washington’s loss.

You don’t replace a starter based on one play but Lauvao did not have a good year. The sack was one of three allowed by Lauvao, the most in the interior line, and the 32 QB hurries he allowed were the most on the entire team. His run blocking was inconsistent. It’s clear that the position could use an upgrade.

Lauvao missed two games due to injuries and Arie Kouandjio filled in for him. Kouandjio was better in his second start than he was in his first, but he showed that he still has work to do. He is going into his third season and he has some room to improve but it remains to be seen if he can reach the point where he is a viable option as a 16-game starter.

The crop of free agent guards looks spotty (Chris Chester, anyone?) and there isn’t a guard worth of a first-round pick (for which Jay Gruden probably is grateful). Perhaps a second-round guard like Dan Feeney of Indiana or Taylor Moton of Western Michigan could start right away but other draft needs may have higher priorities.

It looks to me like they may get through 2017 with Lauvao and Kouandjio and perhaps find a mid-round pick who can develop into the 2018 starter.

Finlay: Points to Tandler for the guard jab. He likes that one. As for Lauvao, he drew the ire of many fans last season. Some of it was deserved, though he was playing with a variety of injuries in the second half of the season, but most of the offensive line was. It gets largely forgotten that he played very well early in the year. 

If the 'Skins, and namely Bill Callahan, determine Kouandjio is ready to start, Lauvao could be in trouble. Cutting him would save $4 million against the salary cap. That will certainly be considered in this equation. That will take a big leap from Kouandjio this offseason though, as he needs to significantly increase his upper body strength and footwork. 

More offseason questions: 

What are reasonable expectations for Josh Doctson?

— Will there be a surprise salary cap cut?

— Should the Redskins defense switch to the 4-3?

— Is Spencer Long the answer at center?

— How many D-linemen do the Redskins need?

— Should the Redskins draft another QB? 

— With Sean McVay gone, will the Redskins run the ball more?

— Can Cravens handle the transition to safety? 

— Will the Redskins re-sign Pierre Garçon? 

— Will Rob Kelley be the lead running back in 2017?

— Defense in the first round?

<<<LOOKING AT REDSKINS DRAFT PROSPECTS>>>

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN and @Rich_TandlerCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!