Caldwell relishes chances to run Ravens offense

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Caldwell relishes chances to run Ravens offense

OWINGS MILLS, Md. (AP) Don't expect Jim Caldwell to incorporate the triple-option or a variety of trick plays in his first NFL game as an offensive coordinator.

Caldwell grabbed the reins of the Baltimore Ravens' offense on Monday after head coach John Harbaugh fired Cam Cameron. Caldwell was in his first year as Baltimore's quarterbacks coach, a job he will retain moving forward.

For his first assignment as an offensive coordinator, the 57-year-old Caldwell will be asked to oversee and direct an attack that must outdo Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, whom Caldwell coached in Indianapolis.

``It may seem like a bit of a novelty, but it isn't.,'' Caldwell said Thursday. ``We both have a job to do.''

Caldwell takes over a unit that has is ranked 18th in total yardage and has been inconsistent throughout the season. With only three weeks to go, he intends to tweak the offense rather than overhaul it.

``Obviously there's not going to be a system change of any sort,'' he said. ``I'll add a few wrinkles here and there. For the most part, I think the guys are comfortable with what we do. I've got to find what best suits our personnel and utilize that. Do the things that we do best.''

Cameron was criticized for not using running back Ray Rice enough, and others questioned whether quarterback Joe Flacco showed improvement from a year ago. Caldwell wouldn't tip his hand on how he intends to utilize either player, but it appears as if he can't wait to put his stamp on a unit with plenty of weapons.

``The reason why I coach is that I have a great passion for the game,'' he said. ``I love a challenge. There is nothing about professional football that's easy. So it's going to require everything you have and just a little bit more. That's what makes me excited about what we're doing.''

His only wish was that this opportunity came under different circumstances.

``The situation is tough. I hate to see a colleague lose his job,'' Caldwell said. ``I've been fired a few times as well. That's the tough part of it. But nevertheless I certainly am excited about having the opportunity to work with some outstanding men in a great organization with outstanding people surrounding me. Let's see what we can do.''

Flacco, like many players on the team, was stunned to see Cameron dismissed - especially at a time when the Ravens needed only one more win to clinch a fifth consecutive playoff berth. But Baltimore (9-4) has lost two in a row, and with a defense depleted by injury, it was time for the offense to take charge and make things happen.

``I think as an offense, we have to look at ourselves and see what we can do to be better,'' Flacco said. ``Obviously, we weren't good enough.''

With Caldwell at the helm, things won't be much different - although he intends to work in the booth rather than on the sideline, as Cameron did.

``Anytime you've been coaching quarterbacks, the offense runs through you,'' Caldwell said. ``That's what I've always been excited about.''

Quite a change for a guy who was a four-year starter at defensive back for Iowa from 1973-76 and began his coaching career working with the defense.

``I went to the offensive side of the ball to get a good sense of balance and things of that nature,'' Caldwell said. ``I wanted to really know offensive football. So the great majority of the latter part of my career has been on offense. There's not anything that you should not know if you're coaching the quarterbacks because you're involved in every situation.''

Now, though, he will be responsible for calling the plays. Whether he maintains the job after this season remains to be seen.

``You know what? I don't look any further than the next day,'' he said. ``Nothing's promised to you. In the Bible it tells you that. What I do is do my job. We'll worry about the other things down the road.''

Caldwell was head coach at Indianapolis from 2009-11. He was fired after the team went 2-14 in 2011, but still harbors hopes of getting another chance.

``I think if you're in this business that should always be your goal. Right?'' he said. ``I don't think I'll ever lose that particular desire until the point in time when they run me out of this business.''

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Mike Tomlin, Antonio Brown go to Penguins playoff game

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Mike Tomlin, Antonio Brown go to Penguins playoff game

If you didn't the the Pittsburgh Steelers enough already, this ought to help. Steelers coach Mike Tomlin and receiver Antonio Brown decided to take in some hockey on Thursday and unfortunately, they were cheering for the local team.

On the one hand, what do you expect? They play for the Pittsburgh Steelers so it's no surprise to see them cheering for the hometown team. On the other hand, the Steelers are the team Ravens fans all love to hate so to see them supporting the chief rivals of the Washington Capitals, that stings.

Just one more reason to hate the Steelers this football season.

RELATED: SEAN PAYTON SAYS RAVENS LOSING WEEK OF OTAS ISN'T THAT BIG OF A DEAL

Sean Payton says Ravens losing week of OTAs isn't that big of a deal

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Sean Payton says Ravens losing week of OTAs isn't that big of a deal

The Ravens forfeited one week of OTAs as part of their punishment for breaking offseason workout rules (the team dressed players in full pads during rookie minicamp, which is a no-go). But don't worry guys, Saints head coach Sean Payton says that's no biggie. 

Of course a few OTA days seem like peanuts to a guy who was suspended for all of 2012, you may be thinking. But hear the man out.  

During a radio interview with PFT Live, Payton was asked about the impact of losing those sessions. 

I don’t think it’s a big deal. The reason I say that is, look, it doesn’t keep the players from lifting and running and so a week of OTAs would be three on-the-field sessions. You don’t want to lose those opportunities and, shoot, one of those opportunities you might have some type of team building experience set up. I think each team does similar things during the OTAs. There’s a lot of offense versus defense. There’s some restrictions regarding one-on-ones but the players are out there in their element, and they’re going though a little bit of a practice format for two hours. So really that equates to about six hours on the field.

Payton explained that the offseason's first phases are valuable because players return to the facility to work out and build camaraderie.

The Ravens may miss out on practice elements, but they're still getting to do what's most important at this early juncture. 

Ravens receiver Breshad Perriman hopes for better health for ailing father and himself

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Ravens receiver Breshad Perriman hopes for better health for ailing father and himself

As Ravens wide receiver Breshad Perriman looks forward to a healthier season, he is also dealing with his father’s health concerns.

Brett Perriman, who suffered a stroke May 3, has been transferred from a Miami area hospital to Atlanta for rehabilitation, according to The Miami Herald. The 50-year-old Perriman played for the Saints, Lions, Chiefs, and Dolphins during his 10-year NFL career.

On his Twitter account, Breshad Perriman offered encouragement for his father.

Perriman talked about his father’s health issues briefly following the Ravens’ first OTA session. This has been a difficult offseason for Perriman, who was very close to former Ravens cornerback Tray Walker, who died in a dirt bike accident in March.

“It’s been crazy,” Perriman said. “I’ve been through a lot this offseason, but it’s just making me stronger again and just learning to keep faith and pray a lot more. It’s been rough. It still is rough from time to time, but I’m steady getting through it, pushing through it and keeping faith.”

Perriman missed his entire rookie season with a knee injury, but looked 100 percent at OTA’s running pass routes.

“I don’t even think about it (knee injury) anymore,” Perriman said. “I feel great.

“Not being able to play, that was a hard thing … I feel much stronger. I feel like I went through a lot last year and it made me a better player and a better person.”

Perriman will continue to hope that better times are ahead, both for himself and for his father.