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We asked AP pro football writer Barry Wilner to pick five key players for each team in this Super Bowl. You'll want to pay attention to these guys on Sunday.

First, for the Baltimore Ravens:

-JOE FLACCO (QB, JERSEY NO. 5): Flacco is on a personal streak this postseason with eight touchdowns and no interceptions in three games. He outplayed top draftee Andrew Luck, then Peyton Manning, then Tom Brady in leading the Ravens to the Super Bowl. And he's been successful in the playoffs over his five-year career - he has an 8-4 playoff record and an NFL record by leading his team to playoff wins in each of his first five seasons.

-RAY RICE (RB, JERSEY NO. 27): Rice has been the hub of the Ravens' offense throughout his career - a threat to break long gains on runs or screen passes. This season, he rushed for 1,143 yards and nine TDs, caught 61 passes for 478 yards. He has two touchdowns in the postseason.

-RAY LEWIS (ILB, JERSEY NO. 52): Lewis has been the emotional engine for Baltimore his entire career, and retires after this game. Teammate Bernard Pollard calls him ``The Raven.'' Lewis missed 10 games this year with a torn right triceps, but has been sensational in playoffs with 44 tackles. He was the MVP of the 2001 Super Bowl, the Ravens' only championship, and Defensive Player of Year in 2000 and 2003.

-PAUL KRUGER (DE, JERSEY NO. 99): Kruger had a breakout season and has been among the best defenders in playoffs. He led Baltimore with nine sacks and has 2 1/2 in the postseason. He's very disruptive and also can drop into coverage, though that's not his strength. He doesn't get double-teamed as much with Terrell Suggs getting healthier.

-CARY WILLIAMS (CB, JERSEY No. 29): Williams is a very up-and-down defender who has two picks in postseason, including one in the end zone in the AFC championship. A so-so tackler, better as coverage man, yet made 75 tackles during the season. Williams joined the Ravens in 2009 after Tennessee cut him.

- Barry Wilner


EDITOR'S NOTE - ``Super Bowl Watch'' shows you the Super Bowl and the events surrounding the game through the eyes of Associated Press journalists across New Orleans and around the world. Follow them on Twitter where available with the handles listed after each item.

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Injury Geno Smith suffered vs. Ravens thought to be torn ACL

Injury Geno Smith suffered vs. Ravens thought to be torn ACL

The New York Jets' quarterback controversy appears to have taken another turn.

The team believes the injury Geno Smith suffered against the Ravens is a torn ACL, according to multiple reports.

The Jets decided to bench Ryan Fitzpatrick and go with Smith against the Ravens after a 26-3 Week 6 loss to the Cardinals. Fitzpatrick was leading the NFL in interceptions through Week 6 with 11.

But when the injury forced Smith out of the game late in the second quarter, Fitzpatrick came in and went 9-of-14 for 120 yards and a touchdown, leading the Jets to a 24-16 win. Smith was 4-of-8 for 95 yards and one touchdown before sustaining the injury.

He now has the chance to regain his starting spot.

RELATED: Fitzpatrick critical of Jets organization following win over Ravens

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Former Raven Vonta Leach critical of NFL's double-standard in regards to Josh Brown, Ray Rice

Former Raven Vonta Leach critical of NFL's double-standard in regards to Josh Brown, Ray Rice

Former Ravens' fullback Vonta Leach wants to why.

Leach, who paved the way for the Ravens run game from 2011 to 2013, wants to know why Giants kicker Josh Brown remains in the NFL while Ray Rice still struggles to find work.

Brown did not travel with the Giants to England for their Week 7 game against the Rams due after new information related to domestic violence against his then-wife came to light this week. Brown was placed on the commissioner's exempt list, and according to an ESPN source, the Giants are all but done with him.

Rice, who was teammates with Leach for three seasons, was essentially excommunicated from the Ravens and the NFL after a 2014 video tape was leaked showing Rice strike then-fiancee Janay Palmer in an Atlantic City casino elevator.

Leach wants to know why Brown, who admitted to numerous incidences of domestic violence, has yet to be given the same sort of punishment Rice received.

Rice has made every effort possible to atone for his sin. He has spoken to numerous youth, high school and college teams about the treatment of women, and has shown great sorrow and remorse in the wake of his actions. One would think Rice has done enough to deserve a second chance.

But the issue here is two-fold.

First, Rice is a 5-8 running back who was already nearing a decline at the time of his suspension. Teams don't rely on running backs in the same regard as a few years ago, and while Rice deserves a second chance, he just simple isn't a desired commodity.

Secondly, the video evidence changed the entire perspective. The initial video of Rice dragging his unconscious fiancee out of the elevator was leaked on February 19. Rice was issued a two-game suspension by the NFL four months later. On September 8, video of Rice striking Palmer was leaked. On the very same day, Rice was released by the Ravens and issued an indefinite suspension by the NFL.

There is no tangible evidence against Brown, although it should not make a difference.

Domestic violence is domestic violence regardless of video evidence. But the swift handling of Rice in wake of the second video set a dangerous precedent.

Leach is right. Brown admitted to abusing his wife several times. The discrepancy between the handling of Rice and the handling of Brown should not be this vast. 

While the NFL is attempting to do due diligence, the precedent they set with Rice has made it nearly impossible for them to do the right thing, and they have only themselves to blame.

They also owe Leach — and all of us — an answer.