Orioles hire Dickerson as 3B coach, sign McLouth

Orioles hire Dickerson as 3B coach, sign McLouth

BALTIMORE (AP) The Baltimore Orioles have selected Bobby Dickerson to be their third base coach.

The 47-year-old Dickerson spent the last three seasons as the team's minor league infield coordinator. He has been a minor league coach or manager for the last 20 years with the Orioles, Arizona and Chicago Cubs.

Orioles manager Buck Showalter says Dickerson ``is regarded as one of the best infield instructors in the game.''

He replaces DeMarlo Hales, who left to be bench coach with Toronto.

In other news, the Orioles on Thursday finalized a $2 million, one-year contract with outfielder Nate McLouth, a deal agreed to Dec. 5. The 31-year-old hit .268 with seven homers and 18 RBIs last season.

Jimenez's future is cloudy after brief, ineffective start

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Jimenez's future is cloudy after brief, ineffective start

CLEVELAND—How much longer can the Orioles stay with Ubaldo Jimenez in the starting rotation? 

In Jimenez’s last four starts, he’s allowed 23 runs, 19 earned on 27 hits in 16 2/3 innings. 

Saturday’s start was his shortest with the Orioles and one of his worst. 

Jimenez lasted just 1 2/3 innings, and gave up six runs, three earned in a 11-4 loss to the Cleveland Indians before 21,110 at Progressive Field. 

He was nearly done in the first inning, but Rajai Davis struck out with two outs to end an inning he’d already given up four runs in. 

Vance Worley, who was warming in the first inning, came in to relieve Jimenez after two runners reached after two were out. 

Manager Buck Showalter won’t make a decision now on the next step with Jimenez, but he’s been through ups and downs with him.

“He’s not able to get the ball where he needs to get it. You saw it. Walks and deep counts, kind of taking away the possibility of something other than a fastball, and that’s been a challenge for him,” Showalter said. 

In 2014, Jimenez’s first year with the Orioles, he was sent to the bullpen late in the season, but he doesn’t want to contemplate a return there.
 
“I don’t think about that. It’s not my job to think about that. The only thing I worry about is getting ready every day. Whatever it is, I take it. It’s not my job,” Jimenez said. 
Jimenez (2-6) was in trouble instantly. Carlos Santana singled. Jason Kipnis walked, and after an infield out, Mike Napoli grounded to third baseman Pedro Alvarez, who muffed the ball for an error, scoring Santana and Kipnis. 

After Jose Ramirez walked, Napoli and Ramirez pulled off a double steal, and both scored on Yan Gomes’ single. 

Lonnie Chisenhill singled Gomes to third, and Chisenhall stole second, the third steal of the inning. 

Davis thought he walked on a full count, but was called out on strikes, temporarily saving Jimenez. 

With two outs in the second, Francisco LIndor singled and stole second. Lindor scored on Napoli’s single, and after Ramirez walked, Jimenez was finished. 

His failure to hold runners on badly hurt.

“It’s been a challenge for him. Sometimes, he’s really engaged in it and quick to the plate and sometimes he’s not. We’ve harped on it since he’s been here and it’s been a challenge for him throughout his career,” Showalter said.

“It’s tough on the catchers because our guys are really good at it if they get a chance. We did some things that didn’t help him, too. We had some throwing errors, but when you’re so deep in the counts and 30-some pitches in the first inning, that’s got everybody kind of on their heels there.”

Matt Wieters, who had allowed only four runners to steal on him in the first 29 games he caught, allowed five, four by Jimenez. 

“They’ve got guys who have a lot of tools. The best way to keep them from running is to keep them from getting on base, and they were able to get on. I made a couple throws that didn’t quite carry for me like I wanted to today, but that’s OK. We’ll get back at it tomorrow and try to get a win,” Wieters said. 

The Orioles (27-20) scored against Danny Salazar (5-3) in the fifth when Jonathan Schoop singled, Alvarez doubled and Joey Rickard walked to load the bases with two outs. 

Adam Jones’ fly ball to center scored Schoop.

RELATED: KIM STARTS FOURTH STRAIGHT GAME FOR ORIOLES

With Cleveland (25-22) leading 8-1, Mark Trumbo and Wieters hit back-to-back doubles, and the Orioles were down by six. 

Tommy Hunter, in his first outing against the Orioles since his trade last July allowed two runs in the seventh on an RBI double by Jones, and a double play. 

Jimenez’s next outing would be scheduled for Thursday, the day that Yovani Gallardo throws his first rehab start. But, in the interim Wieters will attempt to boost Jimenez. 

“We have seen where Ubaldo can come back and he has the sort of mental fortitude to kind of rebound and in this clubhouse, we know how much pride he takes in going out there, so we’re going to try and help any way we can and try to get him back where he needs to be. We’re confident he’ll get there,” Wieters said. 

NOTES: The Orioles made four errors for the second time this season, and allowed a season high 11 runs for the third time. Six of the 11 runs were unearned.  … There was a 22 minute rain delay in the eighth. … Chris Tillman (6-1, 2.61) faces Mike Clevinger (0-1, 8.71) on Sunday. … Worley pitched 4 1/3 innings in relief, equaling the longest in his career. 

MORE ORIOLES: GALLARDO'S SIMULATED GAME GOES WELL, REHAB START SET

Kim starts fourth straight game for Orioles

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Kim starts fourth straight game for Orioles

CLEVELAND—This week, Hyun Soo Kim reached a mini milestone. He played in consecutive games for the first time, and on Saturday started his fourth straight game. 

He entered Saturday’s game with a .410 average in 39 at-bats  before grounding out in the first inning. 

Though Kim’s English is improving, and he can understand some of what’s said, he still relies heavily on interpreter Danny Lee. 

“I was talking to Danny yesterday. I said, ‘How’s he doing?’ I always ask what’s going on. He said, ‘Oh, he’s playing with me, acting like he’s tired and doesn’t know if he can play again.’ I kid him,” manager Buck Showalter said. 

“I just think he kind of brings some things we kind of need, some selectivity and kind of slow things down here and there. First of all, the guy’s going to have to get below .400 before you take him out.”

NOTE: Longtime Orioles infielder Melvin Mora hit two home runs in the Hall of Fame Classic in Cooperstown, N.Y. 

RELATED: GALLARDO'S SIMULATED GAME GOES WELL, REHAB START SET

Gallardo's simulated game goes well, rehab start set

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Gallardo's simulated game goes well, rehab start set

CLEVELAND—A little more than two hours after Yovani Gallardo completed a simulated game, manager Buck Showalter announced that he would make a rehab start at Frederick against Potomac on Thursday night.

Showalter hopes that Gallardo, who threw 45 pitches on Saturday will be able to throw four innings or 60 pitches in the rehab start. Assuming Gallardo feels strong on Sunday and has a work day early next week, the rehab assignment is on. 

“It’s encouraging. We’re trying not to get too far ahead of ourselves. That’s about as far as I’m going to go, but we’ve got a plan if everything goes well,” Showalter said. 

Gallardo, who has been on the disabled list since Apr. 23 with tendinitis in his  was satisfied by the simulated game. He faced one major league hitter, Paul Janish, and two coaches, Einar Diaz and Wayne Kirby. 

“I felt pretty good. The curveball was coming out like the previous two bullpens. Offspeed pitches were sharp. I’m pretty excited about how it all went today,” Gallardo said. 

“I think it’s a matter of getting that pitch count up, to be honest. It’s one of those things. It’s going to be key and it’s all going to depend on how I’m able to recover each and every time that I throw.” 

Janish has hit against Gallardo in the past, and was happy to help out. 

“I think I stood in for four simulated at-bats, so I saw all of his pitches. He threw his changeup, his cutter, his curveball and his regular fastball. Everything was crisp and he seemed to have good control of everything, which I think is another indication that he’s not having any kind of tweaks or discomfort. I think control would be the first thing to go, so he looked good. Best way to say it is he looked good.”

Showalter was upbeat about Gallardo’s simulated game. 

“He got a little tired at the end, which you can expect. The arm swing was good. You can tell by the smile on his face that he felt good about it,” Showalter said.