Washington Redskins

One of the NFL's best runners charged with DUI

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One of the NFL's best runners charged with DUI

From Comcast SportsNet
Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch was charged Wednesday with driving under the influence in Northern California. Lynch was charged by the Alameda County district attorney with driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol and driving while having a blood-alcohol level of .08 or higher. Lynch has a court date on Aug. 14, which is in the middle of Seahawks training camp. But Lynch's attorney, Ivan Golde, told The Associated Press that he feels the case could get thrown out or reduced because of discrepancies in blood-alcohol tests. Golde's contention is that Lynch was not at the California legal limit of .08 when he was pulled over in Emeryville, Calif., on Saturday and tested at the scene. Golde noted that Lynch's level was higher when he was tested on a calibrated breathalyzer later at the jail. "We think we have a really strong case," Golde said. Teresa Drenick, director of communications for the Alameda County district attorney, could not confirm Golde's claim about Lynch's blood-alcohol content and said she could not discuss the details of the case. Lynch was seen weaving on Interstate 880 in the Oakland, Calif., area on Saturday morning, leading to his arrest for investigation of DUI. An incident report released by the California Highway Patrol described Lynch driving a Ford Econoline van and having two near collisions with two other vehicles driving in adjacent lanes. This is Lynch's first off-field problem since coming over to Seattle from Buffalo during the 2010 season. Lynch's career stalled with the Bills and was highlighted by two off-field brushes with the law, one of which resulted in a three-game suspension. He pleaded guilty in March 2009 to a misdemeanor gun charge in Los Angeles. He was sentenced to 80 hours of community service and three years' probation, and was suspended three games by the league for violating the NFL personal conduct policy. That was Lynch's second run-in with the law with the Bills. He was also involved in a hit-and-run accident in Buffalo in May 2008. In the earlier incident, he pleaded guilty to a traffic violation and admitted to driving away after striking a woman with his car near Buffalo's downtown bar district. The league is aware of Lynch's latest legal trouble, but it's unclear whether his past transgressions could get lumped together with his current DUI arrest and lead to yet another suspension. Lynch signed a four-year contract in March that will keep him in a Seattle uniform for the prime of his NFL career. The contract is worth 31 million, including a guaranteed 18 million. Lynch rushed for 1,204 yards and 12 touchdowns last season.

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Redskins' Gruden will readjust to calling plays by going off script

Redskins' Gruden will readjust to calling plays by going off script

RICHMOND—The Redskins offense is dealing with some challenges on the field. Their top two wide receivers from last year left as free agents and replacements Terrelle Pryor and Josh Doctson have little game experience with quarterback Kirk Cousins. Tight end Jordan Reed (toe) was a surprise entry on the PUP list. Running back Rob Kelley needs to prepare to get ready to carry the load for 16 games.

There is one other change the team must deal with. Sean McVay, the team’s offensive coordinator, left in January to become the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams. He had been calling the plays for the past two years. That duty will now fall on head coach Jay Gruden.

RELATED: Reed one of four to start camp on PUP

Play calling is not new to Gruden. He did it from 2011-2013 for the Bengals when he was the offensive coordinator in Cincinnati. Gruden also made the play calls in 2014, his first season as the Redskins head coach.

Still, he wants to make sure that he’s ready to retake the play caller’s headset. The method he will use is to throw away the script.

“I think early on we’re going to have scripted practices, and once we get going, get our main core of plays in there, I think we’ll have a lot of unscripted practices where I can call plays,” he said. “So I think that’s the most important thing, the unscripted practice. Whether it’s two -minute, whether it’s drives down the field, whether it’s third downs, all that good stuff, do a lot of unscripted work, red zone and go from there, but I feel pretty comfortable already.”

That certainly makes sense. Games are not scripted and the successful play callers who can adjust to the ebb and flow of the game. You can’t duplicate the dynamic but you can come close in 11 on 11 work on the practice field.

MORE REDSKINS: Ranking the Redskins roster, the final update

Another key to making this work will be trusting his defensive and special teams coaches. If Gruden can’t delegate to them he will be getting pulled in too many directions on game days.

“How well I handle that will be how successful I will probably be as a coordinator calling plays and as a coach,” he said. “I feel good about the staff that I have around me. Coach [Greg] Manusky and Jim Tomsula and Torrian Gray on the defensive side of the ball, I don’t think I have to worry so much about that, Ben Kotwica, Bret Munsey on the special teams. The big thing is I have got to be involved in the football game, make sure I’m ready for the red flag tosses and all that good stuff, but for the most part I have confidence in the defense and special team coaches and players.”

We will see how well it works out. As a rookie coach he occasionally seemed to be overwhelmed by all that he had piled on his plate (the situation was complicated by his curious decision not to hire a quarterbacks coach). But now, with three years under his belt and an exponentially better understanding of what is involved in coaching an NFL game, there should be more confidence that he can handle it.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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John Urschel retires from the NFL

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John Urschel retires from the NFL

After three years in the NFL, Ravens offensive lineman John Urschel has decided he's had enough, informing the Ravens on Thursday he's retiring from football.

Only 26 and expected to compete for a starting job, this decision certainly came as a surprise.

Urschel was expected to be in the conversation to start at center in Baltimore, who traded last year’s starter Jeremy Zuttah to the 49ers during the offseason. 

Matt Skura and Ryan Jensen are the other candidates for the Ravens.

The announcement also comes just two days after a study about the prevalence of CTE in NFL players was released.

RELATED: JOHN URSCHEL REMAINS MATH'S NO. 1 FAN 

His head coach, John Harbaugh released a statement after he was told of Urschel's retirement plans.

A Ph.D. candidate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Urschel suffered a concussion in 2015, and Harbaugh told a story that shouldn’t surprise anyone about the Ravens’ brilliant mathematician.

“You’re told when you get a concussion not to listen to certain things, not to read certain things, not to study certain things, not to do some certain things that might hurt the concussion part of the brain there,” Harbaugh is quoted in the Baltimore Sun as saying. “So, my man goes out the second day afterwards and does high-level math problems just to see where he’s at.

Urschel clearly has plans for his life after football, but it also leaves the Ravens in a situation where they may have to look for another offensive lineman to fill his spot.

Center Nick Mangold is a candidate, still on the market, and could be a possibility. 

 

RELATED: THINK YOU CAN BEAT JOHN URSCHEL IN CHESS?