NFC East: What you need to know

NFC East: What you need to know

New York Giants (9-7, 394 Points For, won Super Bowl): Eli Manning's pass attempts have risen for three straight years and he's coming off an 8.4 YPA, best of his career. Forget balance in New York, this is Manning's team now, a pass-first scheme. Hakeem Nicks is recovering quickly from his foot injury - don't worry about picking him in the Top 3-4 rounds - and Victor Cruz looks capable of playing outside the formation as well as he does in the slot. Running back Ahmad Bradshaw is one of the toughest backs in the league, but the laundry list of injuries will take a tax eventually. The Giants selected RB David Wilson in the first round, looking to give Bradshaw a caddy. Holdover D.J. Ware has some skills, too. Bottom line, when you look at Big Blue for fantasy purposes, focus on the passing game. Manning, Nicks and Cruz have been surprisingly affordable in most standard leagues this month.

Philadelphia Eagles (8-8, 396 PF): The Eagles looked like a sneaky breakout pick a couple of months ago, given that they won their last four games last year and don't have gigantic public pressure entering 2012. But if Michael Vick's thumb and rib injuries aren't fully healed by opening day, all bets are off. Vick only scored one rushing touchdown last year after nine the previous campaign; split the difference and you still get a nice fantasy kickback. But expecting a full season from him is a fool's errand; he's done it once in nine pro seasons. LeSean McCoy is an elite running back and worthy of a Top 3 overall pick, though his best game comes as a counter-punch to Vick (scrambling quarterbacks create wide defenses and rushing lanes). Jeremy Maclin is the receiver you want in Philly, more reliable than explosive-but-combustible DeSean Jackson.

Dallas Cowboys (8-8, 369 PF): Under most circumstances we'd be on board with Tony Romo, but everything on this offense seems to be crumbling around him. Jason Witten has a spleen injury (push him out of the Top 10 at tight end), Miles Austin's hamstrings are barking, and Dez Bryant has been a high-maintenance act his entire career. The Dallas offensive line also looks like a hot mess, which limits the buzz for second-year back DeMarco Murray. The Pokes have finally moved on from Felix Jones; he's a secondary piece at most, and isn't even guaranteed to make the team. The Cowboys fantasy defense has some sleeper value, given the presence of sack-master DeMarco Ware.

Washington Redskins (5-11, 288 PF): Ah, the poor Redskins. Even when they do something right, it turns into a rocky road. Rookie quarterback Robert Griffin certainly appears ready to play right away, though Kirk Cousins is also showing a strong camp and has his supporters as well. The money invested in Griffin will secure him the gig, and it's the right choice; don't look for a Cam Newton breakout, but he can be a Top 12-15 fantasy QB right away. The receiving group is surprisingly deep, with Pierre Garcon coming over to team with experienced Santana Moss and intriguing Leonard Hankerson. Tight end Fred Davis is an intermediate threat as well. But forget the backfield, where Mike Shanahan can't be trusted (and several options loom). Roy Helu still looks like the best talent of the lot, but the club seems taken by Evan Royster right now, and Alfred Morris and Tim Hightower complicate the situation.

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Will the Shattenkirk trade force the Caps into another deadline deal?

Will the Shattenkirk trade force the Caps into another deadline deal?

With the NHL trade deadline on Wednesday, the question surrounding the Capitals was whether the team would make a move or stand pat. On Monday we got our answer as the team acquired defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk and prospect goalie Pheonix Copley from the St. Louis Blue in exchange for forwards Zach Sanford, Brad Malone and a first and a conditional draft pick(s).

But by addressing the only real weaknesses on the roster, the Caps may have exposed another flaw they could potentially try to address before Wednesday's trade deadline.

With only two right-shooting defensemen in Matt Niskanen and John Carlson, this was a clear area of need for the team. Because of the struggles of the team's two netminders in the AHL, Washington was also in need of a third goalie in case of an injury to Braden Holtby and Philipp Grubauer. You can read more on the team's needs heading into the trade deadline here.

RELATED: Capitals land defenseman Kevn Shattenkirk

The team addressed both of those needs Monday with Shattenkirk and Copley, but it came at a price. Losing draft picks will have future implications, but the loss of Sanford weakens the team in the present.

Heading into the postseason, if healthy, it's not hard to guess what the Caps' forward lines would be:

Alex Ovechkin - Nicklas Backstrom - T.J. Oshie
Marcus Johansson - Evgeny Kuznetsov - Justin Williams
Brett Connolly - Lars Eller - Andre Burakovsky
Daniel Winnik - Jay Beagle - Tom Wilson

But what if there was an injury? Prior to the hand injury suffered by Andre Burakovsky, the Caps were using the minimum number of forwards and cycling through players from Hershey for road games. That's not an ideal setup for the playoffs.

The plan was thought to be for the team to carry Sanford and Jakub Vrana as the two depth forwards for the postseason. Pinning your hopes on two rookies to step into a playoff situation when called upon is not without risk. Now, however, the Caps don't even have that.

There's a difference between plugging a player in the lineup in the regular season and in the playoffs. The regular season offers an opportunity to give players like Riley Barber and Chandler Stephenson valuable experience. The team can feel comfortable plugging in Zach Sill or Liam O'Brien for a few games. But when it comes to the playoffs in which every game counts, every win brings you one step closer to the Stanley Cup and every loss brings the season closer to an end, the team needs more options than a handful of green prospects and veteran AHLers.

Vrana is projected to be a top-six talent and is starting to hit his NHL potential. He also, however, is prone to turnovers and needs to work on how he plays without the puck. He is a good option for Washington in the playoffs, but for him to be the only option is an enormous risk.

The Shattenkirk deal shows the Caps are all-in this year, but there's one more move they may need to make. With Sanford now gone, the Caps will need to act fast to bring in more forward depth because, besides Vrana, there's not a whole lot of options within the organization.

MORE CAPITALS: Trotz admits Ovechkin was "off" during Saturday's game

Behind Ty Outlaws eight three pointers, the Hokies knock off No. 25 Miami

Behind Ty Outlaws eight three pointers, the Hokies knock off No. 25 Miami

BLACKSBURG, Va. -- Ty Outlaw scored a career-high 24 points to lead Virginia Tech to a 66-61 victory over No. 25 Miami on Monday night.

Outlaw, who was averaging 5.0 points per game, set a school record with eight 3-pointers for the Hokies (21-8, 10-7 Atlantic Coast Conference), who won their third straight game and fifth in the last six. Virginia Tech also moved to 15-1 at home this season.

Miami (20-9, 10-7), which moved into The Associated Press top-25 for the first time this season earlier in the day, led 50-48 with just under seven minutes to go.

However, the Hokies went on a 12-4 run to take the lead for good. Virginia Tech scored on five straight possessions, with the final five points coming on a 3-pointer by Outlaw and a dunk by Zach LeDay for a 60-54 lead with 2:11 remaining.

Anthony Lawrence led Miami with 18 points.