New app designed for sports fans on Twitter

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New app designed for sports fans on Twitter

From Comcast SportsNet
CHICAGO (AP) -- When Philip Sanford goes to his favorite bar to watch his beloved Seton Hall Pirates, he brings along his phone charger so he also can follow the game on Twitter. Heather Carleton looks to the social media website for clarification when there's a disputed call involving the San Francisco 49ers. David Foreman likes to communicate with West Virginia fans across the country. More and more these days, when the game is on, so is the computer. Or tablet. Or cellphone. Sports fans around the world are following along on Twitter while they watch their favorite teams in person or on TV, and a new application from a San Francisco startup is designed to make that experience even easier for them. "Since I can't really listen to it since I'm at a sports bar, I like to read about what's going on from a journalistic point of view," said the 29-year-old Sanford, who lives in Charlotte, N.C. "I can learn about what's going from several different sources." There are signs all over that sports fans are using Twitter even while the game is going on in front of them. Sporting events are responsible for the majority of the top moments measured in tweets per second. The Champions League match between Barcelona and Chelsea on April 24 peaked at 13,684 tweets per second, second only to the 2011 showing of a movie in Japan. According to a study by the Perform sports media group, 26 percent of U.S. fans use social media platforms to follow their favorite sports, up from 15 percent in a similar survey in 2011. One-third of those fans say they use Twitter to follow sports, trailing Facebook (89 percent) and YouTube (65) -- based on 1,002 online interviews of adults conducted during February and March. Colleges and professional sports are paying attention to those numbers. Sunday's Pocono 400 Presented by (hash)NASCAR marked Twitter's first official partnership with a sports league. There are all sorts of official hashtags that allow fans to zero in on everything being said about their hometown teams at key moments. "It's really interesting to get more perspective on the game or whatever, whether it's golf or football, because I get to learn more about the players maybe the announcers aren't talking about," Carleton said. "So I think it's becoming more of a tool or resource than the social media part." Carleton, 34, a stay at home mom in Portland, Ore., goes to Mike Pereira whenever there is a questionable ruling in a 49ers game. Pereira was NFL vice president of officiating from 2001-09 and will weigh in on some controversial whistles on Twitter. "It's kind of nice to have that third party to see if you're being biased or not and then you feel vindicated if he says you're right," she said. Foreman, 40, of Lewisburg, Pa., likes the community aspect found on Twitter during sporting events. "I'm sort of an expatriate so a lot of time as I'm watching the Pirates game I am communicating with people in California and other far-flung locations, especially watching WVU," said Foreman, who works in development at Bucknell University. Will Hunsinger knows exactly what Foreman is talking about. Hunsinger, 42, is a proud Georgetown alum and avid follower of the men's basketball team. He was watching a game with his wife last year while communicating with a friend from Switzerland over Facebook and receiving text messages from his father when he came up with an idea. "I was like God, if I could just have this in my hand, where I was watching the game and do all this and see what people were talking about on Twitter ... it would make the game even more fun because now I'm connected with all the people I care about being connected with while I'm in the moment,'" he said. That was the beginning of SportStream, a free application for the iPad that was just approved by Apple and is expected to go live on Thursday. The new program offers curated Twitter feeds for major games that focus on posts from the most popular users based on an evolving credibility database. Fans also can check into games on Facebook and invite friends, as well as talk trash with others in another area of the app. "The concept is to enhance the live sports viewing experience rather than replace it," Hunsinger said. "Sports are inherently social. We want to connect friends, fans and foes, if you will, around the game action and enhance the viewing experience by allowing people to connect on whatever and socialize and consume the game conversation at whatever level that they're comfortable with." Hunsinger received a big lift from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen right after he came up with the idea for SportService. The billionaire owner of the NBA's Portland Trail Blazers and NFL's Seattle Seahawks funded the new company with a 3.5 million investment through his firm, Vulcan Inc. Hunsinger and Allen are betting on sports becoming even more intertwined with social media in the future. "I think actually we're just on the front edge of a wave," Hunsinger said. "I think that it's going to continue to explode."

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It doesn't sound like the Mavs will let Nerlens Noel hit NBA free agency

It doesn't sound like the Mavs will let Nerlens Noel hit NBA free agency

NBA teams hoping to acquire a power forward in next month's free agency may be left with one less option, as the Dallas Mavericks appear determined to re-sign Nerlens Noel, a restricted free agent.

That's according to Marc Stein of ESPN:

Noel, 23, was traded to Dallas from the Sixers back in February for Justin Anderson, Andrew Bogut and two second round picks. He played 22 games for the Mavs, who did not qualify for the playoffs.

Trading for Noel represented a risk, given he does not have a contract for next season. But Dallas should have the opportunity to match whatever offer he gets in free agency if he indeed makes it that far.

Noel, though, could be expensive. He's very young and holds averages of 10 points, 7.5 rebounds, 1.6 steals and 1.5 blocks per game through three NBA seasons. Durability is a concern, as he only played in 51 games last season due to a surgery he had in October. But he played in 67 games the season before and 71 the year before that.

Noel was the sixth overall pick in 2013, the same year the Wizards took Otto Porter third overall.

[RELATED: Winners, losers, sleepers from 2017 NBA draft]

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Capitals lineup projection: How do the Caps replace Nate Schmidt?

Capitals lineup projection: How do the Caps replace Nate Schmidt?

Both the expansion draft and the entry draft have come and gone as have the flurry of trades that come with them. Through it all, the Caps find themselves short a top-four defenseman with the loss of Nate Schmidt to Vegas. Schmidt’s departure obviously changes the team’s plans for next season.

In May, I gave a projection of what the Caps’ opening night roster may look like next season. Obviously, things have changed, but just how much?

Here's an updated post drafts lineup projection.

Forward lines

Andre Burakovsky – Nicklas Backstrom – T.J. Oshie
Alex Ovechkin – Evgeny Kuznetsov – Marcus Johansson
Jakub Vrana – Lars Eller – Tom Wilson
Riley Barber – Jay Beagle – Brett Connolly
Extra: Chandler Stephenson

RELATED: Caps continue to strengthen defense in draft

Nothing new here. Whether Oshie would return next season was the biggest question mark. The team answered that question with his new contract that will keep him in Washington for the next eight years.

The question now is how to best organize that lineup?

Connolly’s skillset does not suit the fourth line very well, but Wilson’s strong postseason clearly made an impression. The Caps traded for Tyler Graovac in order to protect an extra forward from the expansion draft because they did not want to leave either Wilson or Eller exposed. That likely means they envision a larger role for Wilson going forward.

The big takeaway from this is that the team has more skilled players than spots in the top nine. Someone is going to get pushed down to the fourth line or perhaps be offered as part of a trade to another team.

Defensive pairs

Dmitry Orlov – Matt Niskanen
(Philipp Grubauer trade) – John Carlson
Brooks Orpik – Madison Bowey
Extra: Taylor Chorney

The loss of Schmidt is a significant one as there is no clear replacement for him on the roster. Prospects Bowey and Christian Djoos will get their shots at training camp, but they are both rookies with no NHL experience. To put both in the lineup and one in the top-four would not be an ideal situation for a team still looking to make the playoffs. The team’s cap constraints, as well as a weak free agent market in terms of defensemen, makes it unlikely the team will sign someone this summer. That makes the most likely scenario a trade.

The expansion draft forced teams to evaluate who on their roster was expendable. Grubauer is the current backup and is not considered to be the team's future starter because of prospect Ilya Samsonov. Grubauer is a trade asset the team could afford to trade away for a top-four blue liner.

But this is a deal that the team needs to pull off sooner rather than later as the number of teams in the market for a goalie is quickly dwindling.

Goalies

Braden Holtby
Pheonix Copley

If Grubauer is gone, that would put Copley in line to take over the backup role next season. The clock is ticking for the Caps, however, given that he will soon be an unrestricted free agent and could sign with another team.

MORE CAPITALS: Re-signing Oshie was 'the highest priority' for Caps