Paterno's family to do own investigation

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Paterno's family to do own investigation

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Joe Paterno's family on Monday strongly denied the findings of a special investigator who concluded the late football coach and other top Penn State administrators concealed Jerry Sandusky's sexual abuse of children in order to shield the school from bad publicity.

In a statement, the family said its lawyers will conduct their own investigation of the scandal.

"Our interest has been and remains the uncovering of the truth," the statement read.

The family characterized the 267-page report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, who was hired by the university board of trustees, as "yet another shocking turn of events in this crisis" and said Paterno, who died in January at age 85, did not knowingly protect a pedophile.

"We are dismayed by, and vehemently disagree with, some of the conclusions and assertions and the process by which they were developed," the statement said. "Mr. Freeh presented his opinions and interpretations as if they were absolute facts."

Sandusky is awaiting sentencing after being convicted last month of 45 counts for abusing 10 boys.

Freeh, citing emails and handwritten notes, concluded that Paterno intervened to stop a plan by three top Penn State officials to report a 2001 allegation against Sandusky to child-welfare authorities.

The report also cited two emails that showed that Paterno knew about a 1998 allegation.

Freeh said Paterno and the other three officials, including ousted Penn State President Graham Spanier, exhibited "callous and shocking" disregard for child victims.

The Paterno family statement said the coach reported the 2001 allegation from graduate assistant Mike McQueary to his superiors.

"It can certainly be asserted that Joe Paterno could have done more. He acknowledged this himself last fall," the family statement said. "But to claim that he knowingly, intentionally protected a pedophile is false."

Monday's statement was issued amid calls for the removal of the famed statue of Paterno outside Beaver Stadium. A university spokesman said Sunday there's been no decision on the sculpture's fate.

Rayshad Lewis, son of Ray Lewis, to transfer and play football at Maryland

Rayshad Lewis, son of Ray Lewis, to transfer and play football at Maryland

For almost two decades, Ray Lewis was one of the main attractions when it came to football in Maryland. Now, another Lewis will have the chance to make a name for himself in the Old Line State.

Rayshad Lewis, Ray's son, announced Monday on his Twitter that he'll be transferring to College Park to play for the Terps. He'll be able to debut for DJ Durkin's team in 2018 after sitting out next season.

As a true freshman at Utah State last year, Lewis had nearly 500 receiving yards on 40 catches. Eight of those grabs went for 20-plus yards, and he found the end zone twice for the Aggies. 

RELATED: JUAN DIXON IS NOW A HEAD COACH

Maryland basketball legend to become Coppin State basketball coach

Maryland basketball legend to become Coppin State basketball coach

According to Don Markus of the Baltimore Sun, Maryland basketball legend Juan Dixon will be named the head coach at Coppin State, his first men's head coaching job.

After his playing career wound down after stints in the NBA and Europe, Dixon joined Mark Turgeon's staff in College Park but was not retained after the 2015-16 season. 

For 2016-17, Dixon took over the UDC women's basketball coaching job finishing with a 3-25 record, but only had nine scholarship athletes. 

Dixon will take over a struggling Coppin State program that has only won 25 games in the past three seasons and hasn't finished with a winning record in the MEAC since 2011-12.

Coppin State became only the third No. 15 seed to top a No. 2 seed in 1997, but have only made the NCAA tournament one time since then (2008). Dixon will look to return Coppin State to the success it had during the 1990's. 

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