NCAA

No. 5 Maryland women stunned by St. Joseph's

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No. 5 Maryland women stunned by St. Joseph's

PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- Saint Joseph's had lost 10 straight against ranked teams and hadn't defeated a top-five opponent in nearly 36 years.

The Hawks changed all that Saturday, stunning No. 5 Maryland 50-49 behind Chatilla van Grinsven's 18 points.

Saint Joseph's (2-1) beat a ranked foe for the first time since a victory over No. 15 Auburn on Dec. 29, 2007. The Terrapins are the highest-ranked team the Hawks have defeated since upsetting No. 3 Montclair State way back on March 11, 1977.

"This win means so much," van Grinsven said. "We've been so close so much, and to come through is a great feeling. We're celebrating this win. We played as hard as we could and made some plays at the end."

Saint Joseph's had dropped 10 straight games to the Terrapins before this one but held Maryland scoreless over the final seven minutes.

Alyssa Thomas had 16 points and 15 rebounds while Laurin Mincy added 14 points for the Terrapins (2-1), who opened the season with a 39-point victory over Mount St. Mary's and a 43-point win over Loyola.

"This has been a great week for this program," said Saint Joseph's coach Cindy Griffin, whose team defeated Drexel on a game-winning 3-pointer at the buzzer Wednesday. "I think we're not perfect, but we're finding ways to win. I think we're tough. I think our players are tough."

Maryland, a regional finalist in last season's NCAA tournament, couldn't shake the Hawks, even after building a 47-38 lead with 9:10 remaining.

"I thought St. Joe's had a terrific game plan and made us work for everything," Maryland coach Brenda Frese said. "They made it difficult for us to get into our offense."

Saint Joseph's went on a 12-2 run to take a 50-49 lead with 4:21 left. The Terrapins committed five of their 19 turnovers during the spurt.

Thomas hit a jumper for a 49-44 lead with seven minutes remaining, but that was all the offense the Terrapins would muster the rest of the game.

Still, Maryland had three chances to win in the final 19 seconds.

Katie Rutan missed a jumper and Thomas had her follow shot blocked by van Grinsven.

The Terrapins had one last chance with less than a second left, but Tianna Hawkins misfired from the baseline and the Saint Joseph's bench erupted in celebration.

"This win is the result of our hard work and preparing," van Grinsven said. "It's a great day for our program here."

Erin Shields added 10 points for the Hawks, who won despite being outrebounded 47-27. Thomas had nine offensive rebounds.

Neither team hit a 3-pointer in the second half. Hawkins managed just two points after scoring 51 in the first two games.

Maryland plays No. 15 Nebraska and No. 2 Connecticut in the next two weeks.

"Obviously, we have a thin margin for error," Frese said. "Obviously, we've got to come ready to play. This will absolutely humble us."

Jackson, Peoples lead No. 13 Hokies past ODU, 38-0

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Jackson, Peoples lead No. 13 Hokies past ODU, 38-0

BLACKSBURG, Va. -- Steven Peoples had scored three career touchdowns for No. 13 Virginia Tech heading into Saturday's game against Old Dominion.

Now he's scored six, including a right-place-at-the-right-time deflection that turned his good day into a career day.

On the play, Peoples ran a wheel route and was a few steps behind Hokies start receiver Cam Phillips. Both were well covered, but quarterback Josh Jackson let fly from near midfield as the four players approached the end zone. The ball went to Phillips, but in the scramble with the defender, it bounced away, right into Peoples' arms for a 43-yard touchdown.

"I sat back and was waiting for Cam to catch it," Peoples said, noting Phillips' reputation for catching the ball in traffic. "As soon as it bounced off him, I caught the ball and I was like, `Man, that was a big-time catch.'"

On the sideline, while teammates celebrated, Jackson got a talking-to from coach Justin Fuente.

"Not for public consumption," Fuente said what asked what he told the redshirt freshman. "Not happy. We got lucky on that one so I made sure he knew about it. He's smart. He's tough. He understands stuff and he's still young."

Said Jackson: "That was the first touchdown I've ever felt bad after throwing."

Jackson threw for two more scores -- a 17-yard screen pass to Peoples and a diving 5-yarder to C.J. Carroll -- as the Hokies (4-0) finished their non-conference schedule unbeaten for the first time since 2011. Peoples also scored on a 1-yard run.

Virginia Tech started slowly for the second consecutive game, leading just 3-0 after the first quarter, but scored on four consecutive drives after getting untracked. The Hokies have scored 95 consecutive points since falling behind 17-7 at East Carolina last week.

The Monarchs (2-2), playing an Atlantic Coast Conference opponent for the second week in a row, fell to 0-9 against Power Five schools.

The game was the first meeting between the schools and featured the first career start for 17-year-old Old Dominion quarterback Steven Williams Jr. He showed a nifty ability to escape the Hokies' pass rush, getting sacked just once, but completed just 8 of 26 for 85 yards. Monarchs receivers didn't help by dropping several balls, including one that Travis Fulgham could have taken 75 yards for a touchdown.

"He didn't get a lot of help out there today," coach Bobby Wilder said after his team barely made it across midfield all game. "There were four of five times where we needed to make a catch, we needed to make a play, and we didn't."

Williams took it in stride.

"It's just part of the game. We know we need to clean that up," he said. "We have to be more aggressive. If we find our run game, we're going to be fine."

Jackson was 20 for 30 for 298 yards and has now thrown for 11 touchdowns. He did throw his first interception of the season against the Monarchs, but the Hokies took the ball away three plays later, leading to their first touchdown midway through the second quarter.

Hypocrisy of NCAA loud and clear with Maryland Football promotion

Hypocrisy of NCAA loud and clear with Maryland Football promotion

The NCAA is a dumb and monumentally stupid organization with rules that often don't make sense for the student-athletes they govern. One of those is paying, or more specifically not paying, athletes.

In an incredible twist of irony, Maryland will give one lucky regular student (that isn't an athlete) $10,000 for something an athlete (not a regular student) could potentially perform on the football field.

This is a highly specific play that will have to happen in order for one lucky student (again, not an athlete) to win the money, but the hypocrisy is incredible and this entire situation is so backward.

A student-athlete could score a touchdown (while not being paid) for the university and while scoring said touchdown will be helping make money for the university (money they will never see a dime from). The university will then turn around and give money to a student who did nothing to earn it, except decide to stay around in the second half for a game that is expected to be lightly attended, thanks to the achievement of a student-athlete who is incapable of receiving said money. 

That makes sense. Totally.

This comes on the heels of a report earlier this week that Division 1 coaches were "spooked" and against new rules that would allow students who met a minimum GPA to transfer and have immediate eligibility.

This is all totally fine.

Anyway, I can't believe someone didn't see the irony here and think "eh, we just had one of the biggest upsets of the weekend and should have a better way to capitalize on our momentum with something cool to entice people to stick around against Towson?"

I guess not.

MORE MARYLAND: TERPS KICKOFF YEAR WITH TEXAS-SIZED UPSET