NCAA

No. 15 Georgetown seeks rebounding effort against Texas

NateLubick

No. 15 Georgetown seeks rebounding effort against Texas

Georgetown's 37-36 scoring-challenged win over Tennessee proved the Hoyas could triumph with minimal, truly minimal offense - at least when paired with a tenacious defensive effort. Considering the number of good looks generated against the Volunteers that went astray, Friday's performance does not have the look of a concerning trend - at least if the starry forward combo of Otto Porter and Greg Whittington stay on the court.

One dynamic that has stuck around longer than desired for the 15th ranked Hoyas involves the rebounding battle. Despite good length across the starting lineup, Georgetown has rarely had a comfortable edge on the glass this season and against its three recent power conference opponents, none at all.

The Hoyas (5-1) finished victorious in two of those three games with the only blemish an overtime-loss against top-ranked Indiana. However, a similar rebounding scenario could prove problematic Tuesday night (7:00 p.m.) against a burly Texas squad at Madison Square Garden in the Jimmy V Classic.

Tennessee finished with a 37-29 rebounding advantage, including 10 offensive boards. Indiana ended up 33-28, UCLA 40-31. Even against overmatched an undersized Liberty in the season's second game, Georgetown's final margin was just two, 29-27.

"We just have to be better at rebounding," junior forward Nate Lubick said following Monday's practice. "People can say it's our lack of depth inside, but we're over 6-foot-8 across the [starting lineup] so there is no excuse not to rebound. That's going to be a big key to [Tuesday's] game against Texas. They are very big and rebound the ball very well."

Indeed they do. The Longhorns (5-2) stand as one of the nation's better rebounding teams. Six players average at least four rebounds per game including 6-foot-4 guard and leading scorer Sheldon McClellan (17.0 ppg). Paced by wide-bodied big men Jonathan Holmes and Cameron Ridley, Texas is averaging 40.7 per contest or seven more than the Hoyas.

"They have a big team," Thompson stated. Asked how his team can reverse its recent rebounding deficiencies against a formidable Texas lineup, the coach bluntly stated, "Box out and go get the ball. It's not rocket science."

Simple enough, as is the importance of corralling those misses.

"Rebounding is the most important thing," said the stretchy Whittington, Georgetown's leading rebounder (8.7) and scorer (12.7). "If you rebound, you limit [other] team's second chances. If you rebound, everything flows."

The Hoyas imposing zone defense certainly prevented Tennessee's offense from flowing. The Volunteers rarely found opportunities inside and missed 13 of 16 three-point attempts. This scheme is largely responsible for holding opponents to 39 percent field goal shooting on the season. However, the yang to the zone defense's yin comes with rebounding assignments. Guarding an area rather than a single player makes impeding progress toward the basket of a would-be rebounder more challenging.

"It's definitely hard to rebound out of a zone, not having one [player] be responsible for boxing out," said Lubick who will play against Texas despite missing the entire second half against Tennessee after suffering an elbow injury. "That's going to be something we have to figure out because we're a team that plays a lot of zone during crunch time."

As for his injury, which limited him to only eight minutes on Friday, Lubick said, "I kind of ripped a rebound down and I kind of slammed my elbow on [Tennessee forward Jarnell Stokes'] head. My arm just went totally numb. My hand went totally numb. I gave it a go, but couldn't keep going."

Thompson said Lubick, who has played in 71 straight games at Georgetown, was limited during Monday's practice, but both player and coach said the rugged forward would be ready for Texas. "100% percent better," Lubick stated.

Asked if his team's offense would be better following Friday's horror show, Thompson said, "I hope so. We've got to put the ball in the basket. I think we missed 17, 18 3-foot shots."

Georgetown finished 36.4 percent from the field, did not score a point over the final 4:10 and lacked a single double figure scorer for the first time since January 11, 1952. Of course, in those scoring and accuracy areas, Tennessee fared worse.

Notes... Despite the offensive struggles against Tennessee, Georgetown's 48.4 field goal percentage ranks 22nd nationally. ...The Longhorns continue playing without point guard Myck Kabongo. The star sophomore has yet to play this season over eligibility concerns stemming from potential improper benefits. ...The matchup against Texas represents Georgetown's final major non-conference opponent and away game until the Hoyas open Big East play Jan. 5 at Marquette. Starting Saturday against Towson, Georgetown closes 2012 with four straight home games. ...The 1952 game, a 55-40 loss to Maryland played in College Park at the Ritchie Coliseum.

Jackson, Peoples lead No. 13 Hokies past ODU, 38-0

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Jackson, Peoples lead No. 13 Hokies past ODU, 38-0

BLACKSBURG, Va. -- Steven Peoples had scored three career touchdowns for No. 13 Virginia Tech heading into Saturday's game against Old Dominion.

Now he's scored six, including a right-place-at-the-right-time deflection that turned his good day into a career day.

On the play, Peoples ran a wheel route and was a few steps behind Hokies start receiver Cam Phillips. Both were well covered, but quarterback Josh Jackson let fly from near midfield as the four players approached the end zone. The ball went to Phillips, but in the scramble with the defender, it bounced away, right into Peoples' arms for a 43-yard touchdown.

"I sat back and was waiting for Cam to catch it," Peoples said, noting Phillips' reputation for catching the ball in traffic. "As soon as it bounced off him, I caught the ball and I was like, `Man, that was a big-time catch.'"

On the sideline, while teammates celebrated, Jackson got a talking-to from coach Justin Fuente.

"Not for public consumption," Fuente said what asked what he told the redshirt freshman. "Not happy. We got lucky on that one so I made sure he knew about it. He's smart. He's tough. He understands stuff and he's still young."

Said Jackson: "That was the first touchdown I've ever felt bad after throwing."

Jackson threw for two more scores -- a 17-yard screen pass to Peoples and a diving 5-yarder to C.J. Carroll -- as the Hokies (4-0) finished their non-conference schedule unbeaten for the first time since 2011. Peoples also scored on a 1-yard run.

Virginia Tech started slowly for the second consecutive game, leading just 3-0 after the first quarter, but scored on four consecutive drives after getting untracked. The Hokies have scored 95 consecutive points since falling behind 17-7 at East Carolina last week.

The Monarchs (2-2), playing an Atlantic Coast Conference opponent for the second week in a row, fell to 0-9 against Power Five schools.

The game was the first meeting between the schools and featured the first career start for 17-year-old Old Dominion quarterback Steven Williams Jr. He showed a nifty ability to escape the Hokies' pass rush, getting sacked just once, but completed just 8 of 26 for 85 yards. Monarchs receivers didn't help by dropping several balls, including one that Travis Fulgham could have taken 75 yards for a touchdown.

"He didn't get a lot of help out there today," coach Bobby Wilder said after his team barely made it across midfield all game. "There were four of five times where we needed to make a catch, we needed to make a play, and we didn't."

Williams took it in stride.

"It's just part of the game. We know we need to clean that up," he said. "We have to be more aggressive. If we find our run game, we're going to be fine."

Jackson was 20 for 30 for 298 yards and has now thrown for 11 touchdowns. He did throw his first interception of the season against the Monarchs, but the Hokies took the ball away three plays later, leading to their first touchdown midway through the second quarter.

Hypocrisy of NCAA loud and clear with Maryland Football promotion

Hypocrisy of NCAA loud and clear with Maryland Football promotion

The NCAA is a dumb and monumentally stupid organization with rules that often don't make sense for the student-athletes they govern. One of those is paying, or more specifically not paying, athletes.

In an incredible twist of irony, Maryland will give one lucky regular student (that isn't an athlete) $10,000 for something an athlete (not a regular student) could potentially perform on the football field.

This is a highly specific play that will have to happen in order for one lucky student (again, not an athlete) to win the money, but the hypocrisy is incredible and this entire situation is so backward.

A student-athlete could score a touchdown (while not being paid) for the university and while scoring said touchdown will be helping make money for the university (money they will never see a dime from). The university will then turn around and give money to a student who did nothing to earn it, except decide to stay around in the second half for a game that is expected to be lightly attended, thanks to the achievement of a student-athlete who is incapable of receiving said money. 

That makes sense. Totally.

This comes on the heels of a report earlier this week that Division 1 coaches were "spooked" and against new rules that would allow students who met a minimum GPA to transfer and have immediate eligibility.

This is all totally fine.

Anyway, I can't believe someone didn't see the irony here and think "eh, we just had one of the biggest upsets of the weekend and should have a better way to capitalize on our momentum with something cool to entice people to stick around against Towson?"

I guess not.

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