N.C. State holds off Maryland on late FG attempt

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N.C. State holds off Maryland on late FG attempt

By DAVID GINSBURG

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) -- Mike Glennon directed a frantic drive to set up a 43-yard field goal by Niklas Sade with 32 seconds left, and North Carolina State overcame a valiant performance by Maryland backup quarterback Devin Burns in a 20-18 victory Saturday.

After Sade's kick, the Terrapins moved 60 yards in five plays behind third-string quarterback Caleb Rowe before a 33-yard field goal try by Brad Craddock hit the left upright with two seconds remaining.

The Wolfpack (5-2, 2-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) trailed 18-17 and had no timeouts left upon getting the ball at their own 20 with 2:17 to go. Glennon completed a 14-yard pass to Quintin Payton on a third-and-10 and pushed N.C. State into field-goal range with a 14-yard completion to Rashard Smith.

Glennon went 23 for 47 for 307 yards and two touchdowns, and Bryan Underwood had six catches for 134 yards and a score. Underwood has caught a TD pass in seven straight games, the longest such streak in school history.

Burns replaced injured Perry Hills late in the second quarter and nearly produced a stunning victory for Maryland (4-3, 2-1) against all odds in the first extensive action of his college career.

Burns, a sophomore, rushed for 50 yards and completed 3 of 4 passes for 47 yards. He wasn't even on the depth chart at quarterback at the beginning of summer practice and ran only two plays this season before being pressed into action after Hills was carted from the field in the second quarter with what appeared to be a serious knee injury.

Maryland trailed 10-3 at halftime and 17-15 in the fourth quarter before rallying behind Burns and true freshman Wes Brown, who ran for 121 yards on 25 carries.

The Terps went up 18-17 on a 48-yard field goal by Craddock with 13:39 left, but the lead wouldn't stand up.

Hills' injury occurred while he was trying to make a tackle after throwing an interception. The quarterback was chasing David Amerson when he was flattened by Rickey Dowdy, who was called for an illegal block to the back.

Hills was thrust into the starting role in August after C.J. Brown tore his ACL. Hill helped Maryland win four of six games and was 12 for 20 for 159 yards in this one before leaving.

Burns, meanwhile, moved from quarterback to wide receiver in the spring of 2011, then switched back to quarterback during preseason camp after Brown's injury.

In spite of his lack of experience, Burns brought the Terrapins back against an N.C. State coming off a bye and two weeks removed from beating Florida State.

Maryland trailed 10-3 before a blocked punt and interference penalty set up a 1-yard touchdown run by Brown midway through the third quarter. The conversion kick failed.

On the first play following the kickoff, Underwood slipped free down the middle and was 10 yards behind the closest Maryland defender when he hauled in a rainbow pass from Glennon for a 68-yard score.

Undaunted, Burns directed a 74-yard drive that got the Terrapins to 17-15. After peeling off runs of 23, 5 and 14 yards in addition to completing a 38-yard pass to Marcus Leak, Burns scored on a bootleg from the 2.

The Wolfpack gained 18 yards on 12 plays in the first quarter while falling behind 3-0. Hills completed a pass to Leak for 47 yards on Maryland's second possession to set up a 36-yard field goal by Brad Craddock.

NC State bounced back with a strong second quarter, extending a season-long trend. Glennon went 3 for 3 for 71 yards in a 75-yard march that ended with the quarterback hitting wide-open fullback Logan Winkles over the middle for a 25-yard touchdown.

After a Maryland punt, Glennon completed a 28-yard pass to Underwood on a third-and-16, which led to a field goal for a 10-3 lead. Late in the half, Amerson picked off a Hills pass and went the distance, but the block-to-the-back penalty nullified the score.

The Wolfpack has outscored the opposition 62-13 in the second quarter this year.

Media picks Virginia Tech, Virginia to finish low in the Coastal Division

Media picks Virginia Tech, Virginia to finish low in the Coastal Division

Expectations in Blacksburg and Charlottesville are high for their new coaches, just not among the media.

With Justin Fuente taking over for Frank Beamer at Virginia Tech and Broncon Mendenhall for Mike London at Virginia, the media is not expecting much from either coach in their first season. Virginia Tech was picked to finish fourth in the Coastal Division in the ACC Media Poll while Virginia was picked dead last.

Here are the full results with first place votes in parentheses:

Coastal Division
1. North Carolina (121) - 1,238
2. Miami (50) - 1,108
3. Pitt (14) - 859
4. Virginia Tech (3) - 697
5. Duke (2) - 597
6. Georgia Tech (1) - 588
7. Virginia - 261

Atlantic Division
1. Clemson (148) - 1,293
2. Florida State (42) - 1,176
3. Lousiville (1) - 961
4. NC State - 704
5. Boston College - 441
6. Syracuse - 426
7. Wake Forest - 347

ACC Championship
1. Clemson - 144
2. Florida State - 39
3. North Carolina - 7
4. Louisville - 1

Fourth is the lowest Virginia Tech has been picked since the ACC split into divisions in 2005. The good news for both Hokies and Cavaliers fans is that the media is almost always wrong when it comes to these polls. Last year's Coastal winner, North Carolina, was picked to finish fifth in last year's poll.

The lowest Virginia Tech has been picked to finish in the ACC was sixth in 2004, the Hokies' first year in the league. Virginia Tech went on to win the conference that year and played in the Sugar Bowl.

RELATED: TMZ RELEASES VIDEO OF MARCUS VICK RUNNING FROM POLICE

TMZ releases video of Marcus Vick running from police

TMZ releases video of Marcus Vick running from police

Marcus Vick has had a tough day.

First, he decided to start a Twitter beef with Buffalo Bills running back LeSean McCoy. Vick insinuated on Twitter that his ex-girlfriend contracted an STD from McCoy. (You can read the Tweets here but please note they contain explicit language).

As if that wasn't dumb enough, TMZ released video of Vick running from police in an April incident that resulted in his arrest.

In the video, three Cops are standing around Vick when he takes off. He makes it outside and down the sidewalk. It looks like he may get away, but then he sits down and gives himself up as a cop approaches with his gun drawn.

Vick was wanted for contempt of court in Montgomery County. As officers attempted to arrest Vick, he instead chose to flee from the police. That's right, Vick fled from police over a contempt of court charge. He ultimately pled guilty to resisting arrest.

RELATED: HALL TO BE INDUCTED INTO VT HALL OF FAME

DeAngelo Hall to be inducted into Virginia Tech Hall of Fame

DeAngelo Hall to be inducted into Virginia Tech Hall of Fame

Former Virginia Tech standout and current Washington Redskins safety DeAngelo Hall will be inducted into the Virginia Tech Sports Hall of Fame, the school has announced.

Hall played for the Hokies from 2001 to 2003, catching an interception as a true freshman in the very first game of his collegiate career. He was a dynamic player for Virginia Tech on defense, offense and special teams, scoring touchdowns in all three phases of the game. Hall remains the only player in school history to return two punts for touchdowns in the same game which he did in 2003 against Syracuse. He also played a major role in one of the biggest wins in program history, a 31-7 win over No. 2 Miami in 2003 in which Hall scored a touchdown on a strip and return.

The Chesapeake, Va. native was named an All-American after the 2003 season. He left Virginia Tech after three years and was selected by the Atlanta Falcons in the 2004 NFL Draft. He is now in his eighth season in Washington.

Kerri Gardin, Kevin Jones, Spyridon Jullien, Ashlee Lee and Jim Weaver will also be inducted with Hall. The ceremony will take place on Sept. 16 and all six will be introduced the following day during halftime of Virginia Tech's game against Boston College.

RELATED: VIRGINIA TECH LANDS FOUR COMMITMENTS SATURDAY