NCAA

Hoyas survive with ugly 37-36 win over Vols

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Hoyas survive with ugly 37-36 win over Vols

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but nobody that witnessed Georgetown's 37-36 win over Tennessee on Friday night could romanticize the game itself as a many-splendored thing. Not when the game-winning basket and the final points came with 4:10 remaining or when not a single player scored in double figures or when both teams shot less than 30 percent from the field before halftime. You agree, right John Thompson III?

"That wasn't nice to watch? Some people would look at that as a thing of beauty," the Georgetown coach cracked after the offensively challenged, but defensively imposing contest. "I don't know that I've been a part of a game like that."

Nobody else participating in a Georgetown game over the last 30 years has either. The scoring total represented the team's lowest since the Patrick Ewing led Hoyas defeated SMU by the same 37-36 score in the second round of the 1984 NCAA Tournament before going on to win the National Championship.

Of course, that game had the excuse of not being played in the shot clock era. There were no four corners or other antiquated tactics in the Big East-SEC matchup between the No. 20 Hoyas (5-1) and Volunteers (4-2). Just plenty of misfiring and miscues, especially after a Markel Starks jumper before the final media timeout capped the scoring and gave Georgetown that insurmountable one-point lead.

With the final six baskets came six lead changes. With the final four minutes came seven field goal attempts - all without success including three by Georgetown - plus six turnovers before the Verizon Center crowd of 13,656.

"The shots just didn’t fall, it’s not like we weren’t taking good shots for the most part," said Otto Porter, whose eight points matched Greg Whittington and Mikael Hopkins for team-high honors. "We just had to continue to play."

Georgetown did not even attempt a shot over the final 2:20. Porter's mishandling of a Whittington pass sent the ball out of bounds with 22.6 seconds remaining, setting Tennessee up with a final possession.

Yet as was the case throughout, the Hoyas defense rose up. The Volunteers struggled against Georgetown's schemes, especially with its lengthy zone defenders. The final five seconds was no different as Skylar McBee missed from beyond the arc and after Tennessee maintained possession, Jordan McRae the same at the buzzer.

McBee and Trae Golden each scored eight points for the Volunteers, who finished with more rebounds (37) than points, but never trailed by more than eight. Tennessee missed 8 of 11 free throws and shot 18.8 percent (3 of 16) from 3-point range, all leading to its fewest point total since scoring 35 against Auburn in 1997.

"If we win 10-9, I wouldn’t call it a frustrating game, if we get a chance to win it at the end," McBee said. "We didn’t shoot as well as we thought we could. Credit is due to Georgetown, they did a good job on that zone and they are a lengthy team and they make it tough out there."

Georgetown held power forward Jarnell Stokes to four points and only three field goal attempts. Porter was asked how the Hoyas were able to take Tennessee's leading scorer out of the game when Thompson jumped in and whispered, "Everybody was out of the game offensively."

Certainly, that was the case during the first half. Both teams were inaccurate whether from deep (combined 2 of 13) close - Hopkins alone missed at least three open layups - or at the free throw line (6 of 14).

Despite Nate Lubick going in and out of the lineup with a left elbow injury and Starks saddled with two early fouls, the Hoyas cobbled together enough points for a 12-4 midway through the first half. After a Hopkins free throw put Georgetown up 16-11 with 2:08 remaining, Tennessee closed the half with a 7-0 run for 18-16 halftime lead.

"We were getting easy shots that we were missing," Thompson said. "We were getting the ball right at the rim and the ball just wasn't going in."

Georgetown jumped ahead 31-23 with 12:10 remaining, but Tennessee countered with a 9-0 run, setting up the back and forth - and unsightly - finish.

Thompson: "I don't think we need to make that many adjustments offensively in the second half and then we came out and did the exact same thing."

The Hoyas coach acknowledged it "difficult to find too many positives" even after the win before coming up with an upside takeaway for his young squad.

"A lot of times it's easy, particularly for a young team that when you're not scoring to not play defense," Thompson remarked. "When you're not scoring to focus and not get stops. As frustrating as an offensive day that I can remember being a part of, we still got stops."

As for not recalling being part of a game so offensively suspect, Thompson's memory improved by the end of the press conference.

"Actually, I have been part of a game like this. I think I was eight...Game ended 13-11. I had 10 - and we won that game too."

At least that game had a double figure scorer.

Notes...Injured early in the game, Lubick played only eight minutes, none in the second half and will undergo X-rays, Thompson said. According to the coach, his junior forward "hit his elbow" and described a "tingling sensation in his fingers."...Georgetown has won 39 non-conference games at the Verizon Center dating back to the 2006-07 season...The Hoyas play Texas at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday in the Jimmy V Classic.

Unique skillset benefits George Mason's Marquise Moore in NBA aspirations

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USA TODAY Sports

Unique skillset benefits George Mason's Marquise Moore in NBA aspirations

Marquise Moore is not your prototypical college basketball star. But as the 2016-17 season prooved, he is one of the most intriguing and interesting players. 

Standing at just 6-2, the George Mason guard averaged a double-double, and the second category wasn't assists.

The lightly recruited Queens, N.Y. native averaged 16.9 points and 10.9 rebounds, while being the eighth best rebounder in the country. Of the top 50 rebounders last season, Moore was the only one under 6-5 and was the best rebounder among guards. 

Entering college as a two-star recruit with just three offers, Moore's collegiate career ended as a all-conference performer at a traditional mid-major power.

This past season the Patriots finished 20-14, the best mark in Moore's four years with the team. It was also Moore's coming out party, Moore flourished on court and garnered attention from several national outlets due to his unique and unlikely skillset.

Outlets like the Washington Post and Bleacher Report were baffled on how a 6-2 guard could be so good at rebounding. His opponents were baffled too.

"Marquise could not be guarded and kept out of the paint one-on-one in the Atlantic 10," George Mason coach Dave Paulsen told CSN Mid-Atlantic. "I gotta believe he'd have the ability to get into the lane, to attack at the highest of levels."

Now, the Atlantic 10 is nothing compared to the level of play in the NBA, but his skills can transfer across all levels. In the association, teams cannot collapse on a small guard driving down the lane, otherwise sharp shooters will be left open. If his college game can translate, he could be the perfect bench point guard to at least get starters rest and generate scoring opportunities. Already his workouts with the Houston Rockets and Philadelphia 76ers prepared him for the higher level of play. 

"You want it more when you are playing against those type of guys," Moore told CSN in Early July. "I've never been highly ranked, highly recruited or anything. Definitely felt overlooked so I'm glad I proved I'm just as good or better than them." 

Getting some pre-draft workouts with both the Rockets and 76ers, there was optimism that Moore could get pulled for a summer league roster.

Unfortunately for the George Mason grad, an ankle tweak in early May served as a major setback for a player that has a lot to prove with opportunities few and far between.

"I think he'd have four or five more workouts if he hadn't had the ankle sprain," Paulsen said. "Had he had a few more workouts, that would have gotten him more exposure to get in for a summer league thing. He's a few weeks behind because of the ankle sprain and its going to take him a little longer to get where he wants to go."

With the summer league now gone without Moore on any roster, he is now in a limbo like many other talented stars who did not benefit from the high-major spotlight. Of course for all basketball prospects, the ultimate dream is to play in the NBA, but the best path to get there is not always clear.

The two primary options for Moore is to play overseas or continue to get workouts with the NBA and G-League teams domestically. 

Currently, Moore is still battling for his NBA path. He is set up to participate in the G-League Player Invitational Aug. 13 in Chicago, an event he can earn eligibility for the G-League draft in October. 

"I feel like I have interest from NBA teams," Moore said. "Going to the G-league will be a more foreseeable option, but I'm not sure if I want to enter the G-league blindly without hearing from any NBA teams becuase its really hard to move up that way."

As a guard with incredible physicality, the unknown is actually what could bring Moore to an NBA team.

Will there be a team willing to bite?

The G-League Player Invitational will be the next measuring stick on how NBA coaches and scouts feel about Moore a month removed from summer league. Admitting his weaknesses in the workouts, Moore thrives during live-ball action, which is a huge part of the invitational. 

Look out for teams that need rebounding and thrive off of physical play. Teams that come to mind instantly are the Atlanta Hawks, Washington Wizards, Dallas Mavericks, Los Angeles Clippers; two teams that had pre-draft interest, the Chicago Bulls and Rockets; and the team who followed him thoughout his senior season, the Brooklyn Nets.

Its too bad that Washington's G-League team will not be formed until next season, otherwise there would be a perfect backup guard that could work right into Washington's system. 

"Mason fans know what I can do but I feel like most people still don't know. Just trying to show people what I can do one person at a time, you know, get a shot."

University of Virginia cornerback wins $100k in Virginia lottery

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Virginia Lottery

University of Virginia cornerback wins $100k in Virginia lottery

Virginia cornerback Chuck Davis hit all five numbers recently on Cash Five game from the Virginia Lottery to take home $100,000.

He went on a coffee run one morning for his mom and decided to play the numbers his gradmother gave him and now he's $100k richer and looks like the happiest person on the planet.

God first last and always 🙌🏽

A post shared by Charles Davis (@forevergone6) on

Davis is a redshirt freshman after sitting out a year after a transfer from Nebraska. As for his plans for the money?

Here's hoping he gets to enjoy all the money and doesn't get a call from the NCAA.