Dos Santos stops Mir at UFC 146

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Dos Santos stops Mir at UFC 146

By GREG BEACHAM
, AP Sports Writer LAS VEGAS (AP) -- When a state athletic commission official asked Frank Mir where he was between rounds, he named the wrong casino. That's a pretty good indication Junior Dos Santos' punches already were doing their job. The UFC's heavyweight champion knew exactly where he was and what he was doing -- and Dos Santos swiftly showed Mir the door. Dos Santos flattened Mir with a huge right hand and finished him on the ground at 3:04 of the second round Saturday night, emphatically defending his belt at UFC 146 on Saturday night. Dos Santos (15-1) picked apart the two-time ex-champion with superior boxing throughout the fight, eventually sending Mir stumbling onto his back before finishing him with one last blow to the head. Dos Santos then wrapped himself in the Brazilian flag while celebrating his first title defense since taking the belt from Cain Velasquez last fall.

"I'm feeling awesome!" the ever-smiling Dos Santos shouted to the pro-Brazilian crowd. "It's not bad for a nice guy, huh? ... Frank Mir is a really good fighter, too. I came here to defend my belt, and I did it." Mir was staggered by multiple blows, including a big body shot, late in the first round, and he barely made it to the bell. After declaring he was at the Mandalay Bay instead of the MGM Grand Garden, Mir was allowed to keep fighting -- but the beating didn't go on much longer. "My game plan is always to keep the fight on my feet and go for the knockout," Dos Santos said. "I tried to get him a little tired in the first round, and then go for it. When you believe so much in your performance and yourself, it happens." Velasquez stopped Antonio "Bigfoot" Silva late in the first round after administering a bloody beating that both thrilled and horrified fans. Roy Nelson, Stipe Miocic and Stefan Struve also won on a pay-per-view card topped with five heavyweight fights, a first in UFC history. Dos Santos never faced trouble in the fight's eight minutes after easily avoiding an opening-minute takedown attempt by Mir, who hoped his superior jiu-jitsu skills would allow him to avoid Dos Santos' unparalleled striking ability. Mir, who turned 33 on Thursday, has the most heavyweight victories in UFC history, but he couldn't match Dos Santos' skills. "He's a champ," Mir said. "He's fast. I couldn't get out of the way. He hit me hard. There were just too many of them, and they were hard shots. I couldn't do anything about it." Mir stumbled back several steps after Dos Santos' decisive right hand. Dos Santos followed him and added one last head shot before referee Herb Dean saved Mir. "That surprised me a lot," Dos Santos said. "Man, this guy can take a punch. My hand is hurt." Dos Santos downplayed the revenge element of beating Mir, who broke the arm of Dos Santos' mentor, Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira, in a fight last December. Mir (16-6) had won three straight fights since losing a title shot to Shane Carwin in March 2010, but couldn't reclaim the belt he held in 2004 before getting into a serious motorcycle accident and again in early 2009 before losing to Brock Lesnar. Velasquez (10-1) finished Silva at 3:36 of the first round, but only after pulverizing the 6-foot-4 Brazilian with a relentless series of blows after an early takedown. Silva (16-4) was cut on his face early in the beating, sending streams of blood down his face and onto the canvas, eventually coating both fighters' torsos. "I knew he was going to be a tough guy to finish, and he posed certain threats," Velasquez said. "But I'm happy I was able to go in there and perform. I took my time and waited to get good position to turn it on and finish the fight." The fight was stopped once to allow Silva's corner to clear the blood from his eyes, but Velasquez promptly resumed the beating until the fight was finished. The former Arizona State wrestler was ferociously impressive in his first bout since losing the belt to Dos Santos in just 64 seconds during the UFC's first prime-time Fox show. "What you've done in the past, you've got to get over that," Velasquez said. "This is a step in the right direction." The 32-year-old Silva appeared to be outmatched in his UFC debut after a lengthy MMA career highlighted by his dominant Strikeforce victory over Fedor Emelianenko in February 2011. Nelson (18-7) added another impressive stoppage victory to his list, catching Dave Herman (21-4) with an overhand right that sent him sprawling backward onto the canvas. Nelson landed one more shot before the fight was stopped, and then climbed onto the cage to rub his ample belly while his hometown crowd cheered. "My plan was to wrestle, (but) my coaches had a different game plan, which was, Hit him in the face,'" Nelson said. "Guess it worked. Clearly my hands have dynamite in them, or small rocks or whatever." Nelson had lost three of his previous four fights, including decisions to Dos Santos and Mir. But the portly, heavily bearded heavyweight -- who bills himself as a kung fu fighter -- is consistently popular and entertaining. Miocic (9-0), a firefighter and EMT from Cleveland, remained unbeaten after surviving a back-and-forth first round with fellow heralded prospect Shane Del Rosario. He took control in the second, taking down the previously unbeaten Del Rosario and finishing him off with ground-and-pound elbows. Del Rosario (11-1) had a severe cut over his right eye and a bloody face after his UFC debut and his first fight in 15 months. The Orange County fighter recovered from a back injury sustained when his car was hit by a drunk driver last year. Struve finished Lavar Johnson with an armbar just 1:05 into their bout. The 6-foot-11 Dutchman who has lost to Dos Santos and Nelson celebrated his third straight win, while Johnson, the veteran Strikeforce fighter who beat Pat Barry just three weeks earlier, struggled after stepping in as an injury replacement for Australia's Mark Hunt. Earlier, veteran lightweight Jamie Varner upset previously unbeaten Edson Barboza, stopping the touted Brazilian prospect with a long series of blows to the head. Varner, the former WEC lightweight champion who was released from that promotion after an 0-3-1 skid, made the most of his chance to be an injury replacement for Evan Dunham in his first UFC fight since March 2007. Jason "Mayhem" Miller lost a lackluster decision to middleweight C.B. Dollaway, possibly ending the television host's MMA career. Miller (24-10), who has won just three of his last eight fights, previously said he would retire if he didn't beat Dollaway. Dan Hardy, the popular English welterweight, also ended a four-fight skid, stopping Duane Ludwig in the first round. A collection of celebrities including Charlize Theron, MC Hammer and many NFL players, including Cardinals receiver Larry Fitzgerald, attended the show in the UFC's hometown.

NL East: For one day, Harvey silences critics with dominant outing

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NL East: For one day, Harvey silences critics with dominant outing

In New York, where your every move is dissected to a T by fans and media, achieving and maintaining sports stardom can be difficult to do. Just ask Matt Harvey, who went from being the toast of the town while helping the Mets to the World Series last October to having his ability (and character) roundly criticized after his rough start to the 2016 season. And after he lost back-to-back outings against the Nationals recently, it seemed like he had reached rock bottom. 

But for one outing, the man known as "The Dark Knight" managed to silence his critics with a vintage performance against the Chicago White Sox on Memorial Day. He allowed just two hits over seven shutout frames, striking out six and issuing just one walk in the Mets' 1-0 win. The victory raised his record to 4-7 and lowered his ERA to 5.37. 

And unlike his previous start, he addressed the media after the game. Per MLB.com: 

"There's a lot of emotion....It's been a while.…The idea is to do everything you can to help the team, and I felt like I wasn't doing that very well. Today, to be able to go out in a one-run ballgame like that and be able to put up zeros, was very exciting."

The difference for Harvey on Monday was establishing his dominant fastball that had been missing for most of the first two months of the season. His heater was clocked as high as 98 mph, a marked improvement over his previous starts. 

Harvey was considered a hero in 2015, his first full campaign post-Tommy John surgery, as he pitched a total of 216 innings between the regular season and the playoffs. No pitcher had ever thrown that many innings in the first season following the procedure. And it's precisely that fact that many have pointed to when discussing whether or not the 27-year-old right hander is still feeling the effects from last year's overuse. 

So will Harvey return to form? Can he reclaim his status at the Mets ace? It's too early to tell, but Monday's outing was the first that provided a light at the end of the tunnel. Just don't expect the circus to end anytime soon.  

"I think it's a first step," Harvey said. "Obviously, this isn't going to mean anything unless I continue to do this and stay with what we've been working on. It's a work in progress, but I'm happy that I was able to go out there, feel comfortable in my mechanics and get the job done."

Bryce Harper out of Nats lineup day after getting hit vs. Phillies

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Bryce Harper out of Nats lineup day after getting hit vs. Phillies

Nats (31-21) vs. Phillies (26-25) at Citizens Bank Park

Fresh off their comeback victory on Monday night, the Nationals will look to make it three straight wins overall as the continue their series against the Philadelphia Phillies.

Bryce Harper is out of the Nationals' lineup on Tuesday after he took a pitch off his right leg on Monday night. Harper was diagnosed with a contusion on his right leg and, as of last night, was considered day-to-day according to what manager Dusty Baker told reporters in Philly.

Pitching for the Nats will be Joe Ross (4-4, 2.52) in his 10th start of the season. He's coming off a strong performance of seven innings and just one earned run against the Cardinals. Ross saw the Phillies back on April 15 and tossed 7 2/3 scoreless frames in a Nationals win.

Former seventh overall pick Aaron Nola (4-3, 2.86) will take the mound for Philly. He's faced the Nats twice this season, once allowing seven earned runs in five innings on April 16 and then the other time going seven shutout frames in a Phillies win on April 28.

First pitch: 7:05 p.m.
TV: MASN2
Radio: 106.7 The Fan, XM 869
Starting pitchers: Nats - Joe Ross vs. Phillies - Aaron Nola

NATS

CF Ben Revere
RF Jayson Werth
2B Daniel Murphy
1B Ryan Zimmerman
LF Clint Robinson
3B Anthony Rendon
C Wilson Ramos
SS Danny Espinosa
RHP Joe Ross

PHILLIES

CF Odubel Herrera
SS Freddy Galvis
3B Maikel Franco
C Cameron Rupp
1B Ryan Howard
LF Tyler Goeddel
RF David Lough
2B Cesar Hernandez
RHP Aaron Nola

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2015-16 Capitals in Review: Jason Chimera

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2015-16 Capitals in Review: Jason Chimera

With the Capitals’ 2015-16 season now in the rearview mirror, we continue with our numerical player-by-player roster analysis.

No. 25 Jason Chimera

Age: 37 (turns 38 on May 2, 2017)

Games: 82

Goals: 20

Assists: 20

Points: 40

Plus-minus: Even

Penalty minutes: 22

Time on ice: 14:03

Playoff stats: 12 games, 1 goal, 1 assist, minus-1, 12 PIM, 13:00

Contract status: Unrestricted free agent (2015-16 salary: $2 million)

If Jason Chimera set out this season to prove his age is just a number, he accomplished his goal by matching his career high in goals (20) and maintaining his reputation as the faster skater on the Capitals.

The question facing general manager Brian MacLellan is whether the Caps can afford to bring the 37-year-old left wing back to Washington for an eighth season.

If it was up to his teammates, they should.

RELATED: PRESSING OFFSEASON QUESTIONS FACING THE CAPITALS

“He’s great,” Caps center Nicklas Backstrom said. “He’s great to have in the locker room, as well. He’s just an all-around great guy. He’s a funny guy, he jokes around and stuff like that. You need that in the locker room.”

Chimera is a bundle of energy on and off the ice, cracking jokes, singing songs and screaming over interviews in the Caps’ locker room. He’s also a physical anomaly, possessing the kind of speed and physicality that defines third-line wingers in today’s NHL.

“He's a freak,” said Caps center Jay Beagle, who played alongside Chimera much of this season. “He's going to play for, I think, a lot more years. He's still one of the fastest guys in the league. He's got those young legs that never seem to slow down and he’s a great guy in the locker room, a great guy to be around.

“He's going to play a lot of years. It's up to management and him, but I would love to see him back and I would love to play with him again.”

Chimera came into this season with a lot to prove. He was coming off a seven-goal, 12-assist season and had committed 51 minutes in penalties in Barry Trotz’s first year behind the bench, many of them due to a lack of discipline. Chimera cut his penalties in half (22) and more than doubled his offensive output with 40 points.

“I think the understanding with Trotzy was a little better this year,” Chimera said. “I played some power play with Kuzy (Evgeny Kuznetsov) and that didn’t hurt, for sure (4 power-play goals, 5 power-play assists). He’s one of the most skilled guys in the league and I got some easy tap-in goals with him. I played with Beags most of the year and you play with (Tom Wilson) and (Marcus Johansson) came in and played and we had a really good, solid third line all year. It was a fun year. Our team probably had the most fun I’ve ever had in my whole life of playing. It was a fun year to be a part of, right from the coaches all out. It was a good year in that aspect, for sure.”

On the ice, Chimera possesses many of the qualities the Caps seem to be seeking this offseason. Thanks to a grueling offseason workout program, his speed has remained intact and his durability is nearly unmatched. He’s missed just seven games in his last six seasons with the Caps. And he believes he has many more.   

“I’m not putting a number on it,” Chimera said. “I think you’ll know the writing’s on the wall when you’re kind of walking out the door. I haven’t seen any writing yet, so hopefully I don’t see any in the near future. I want to play as long as I can. I won’t put a number on it. I know a lot of players in the past I’ve talked to said, ‘Don’t let go unless you’re ready to let go’ because a lot of guys said there’s nothing like it other than playing.

“I’ll play as long as I can, whatever role I have to. It’s one of those things, I might not score as much as a (Jaromir) Jagr at his age (44), but you hopefully keep going to his age. This game’s treated me really well. Hopefully, it treats me really well moving forward. You don’t see stopping anytime soon.”

After the season MacLellan identified improving the Capitals’ bottom six forwards as his top priority in the off-season, adding that he will see how much money is needed to re-sign his restricted free agents before deciding on whether to re-sign Chimera.

Right now, the Caps have roughly $58.5 million committed to next year’s salary cap, which MacLellan expects to be around $73 million.

If $9 million is needed to re-sign RFAs Marcus Johansson, Tom Wilson, Michael Latta and Dmitry Orlov, the Caps would have roughly $5.5 million in cap space for two players.

Chimera likely will be seeking a deal no less than two years and $4 million. Despite seeing good friends Joel Ward, Mike Green and Eric Fehr depart for greener pastures last summer (Ward and Fehr are playing for the Stanley Cup), Chimera believes he’ll be back in a Caps jersey next season.

“I still think I’m going to be back,” Chimera said. “I’m not confident in anything. In this game, I think you’re not guaranteed anything to be back. I want to be back. You don’t think of playing anywhere else. You know the business side of it, but I still don’t think I’m going to play anywhere else, but we’ll see what happens, right?”

It is that uncertainty that made the Caps’ first-round playoff loss to the Penguins that much more painful for Chimera, who has seen the Caps get to the playoffs in six of the last seven seasons, only to be knocked out in the first or second round.

Last year, Chimera continued his reputation as a playoff performer with three goals and four assists in 14 playoff games. This year he struggled, netting one goal and one assist and taking 12 minutes in penalties in 12 games.   

“This loss was maybe a little more, not taxing, but I guess you don’t know what’s going to go on next year,” Chimera said. “You don’t know if you’re going to be with these guys. You want to be with the guys, but you understand the business side of it, too. That’s why I was disappointed the way it ended, for sure, because you want to win with these guys and you don’t know if you’ll have that chance. Maybe it’ll all work out, but it’s one of those things that it’s a business, and I realize that, too.

“You always leave with that sting in your mouth that you didn’t win. And I think the disappointment of that overshadows a good season sometimes. You overlook a lot of things in this game because a lot of times you end on a bad note. Twenty-nine teams end on a bad note. It was tough to take, for sure, the playoffs. I’m proud of the season I had for sure, but you want to get more out of the playoffs. That was our goal, and that’s what’s disappointing out of it.”