Michael Jordan makes odd hire for Bobcats coach

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Michael Jordan makes odd hire for Bobcats coach

From Comcast SportsNet
The Charlotte Bobcats have hired St. John's assistant Mike Dunlap to be their new head coach, two people familiar with the decision said. The people spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because an official announcement was still being planned for the next two days. The Charlotte Observer first reported the news. The choice comes as a bit of a surprise because Dunlap was not one of the team's three finalists and rejoined the picture late. He was originally one of the 10 candidates to interview for the job, but the team trimmed the list to former Utah coach Jerry Sloan, Indiana assistant coach Brian Shaw and Los Angeles Lakers assistant coach Quin Snyder last week. At some point Dunlap re-entered the picture and was offered and accepted the job Monday night. A text message sent to Dunlap was not immediately returned. Dunlap, 54, will replace Paul Silas, whose contract was not renewed after Charlotte finished with the worst winning percentage in NBA history this past season. The Bobcats were 7-59. A former assistant coach with the Denver Nuggets, Dunlap assumed all duties with the St. John's program after head coach Steve Lavin took a leave of absence to deal with prostate cancer. "The Johnnies basketball family is ecstatic for Coach Dunlap's opportunity," Lavin said in a statement. "Mike's selection as the Charlotte Bobcats' head coach is a well-deserved honor. To make the unprecedented jump from college assistant to NBA head coach is testament to both Mike's abilities as a teacher and our basketball program's marked improvement over the past 27 months." Dunlap has spent most of his career at the college level and has worked under Lute Olson in Arizona. He joined St. John's after serving as the associate head coach on Pac-10 staffs at Arizona and Oregon. Arizona went 21-14 in 2008-09, advancing to the NCAA Tournament's Sweet 16 before ending the season with a loss to top-seeded Louisville in the NCAA Midwest Regional Semifinal game. Dunlap joined Oregon's staff in 2009-10 and the Ducks posted a 16-16 record. Prior to working at Arizona and Oregon, Dunlap spent two seasons in the NBA with the Nuggets working under head coach George Karl. The Nuggets compiled a 95-69 (.579) record during his tenure and made two playoff appearances, including a 50-win season for the 2007-08 Denver squad, a first for the organization in 23 seasons. Early in his career, Dunlap also served as an assistant coach at Southern California under George Raveling, and as an assistant coach at Iowa. He also spent five years as an assistant at his alma mater, Loyola Marymount University. In between he spent 10 years at Metropolitan State College of Denver.

No. 20 Creighton gets revenge on Georgetown at home

No. 20 Creighton gets revenge on Georgetown at home

OMAHA, Neb. -- Marcus Foster scored a career-high 35 points and No. 20 Creighton broke open the game early in the second half in an 87-70 victory over Georgetown on Sunday.

Creighton (22-5, 9-5 Big East) shot 53 percent while avenging a 20-point road loss to the Hoyas on Jan 25. Georgetown (14-13, 5-9) shot just 38.5 percent in its first game since Feb. 11 and was 3 of 22 from 3-point range.

Isaiah Zierden added 13 points and Justin Patton and Cole Huff had 10 apiece for the Bluejays.

L.J. Peak, held to two points over the first 16 minutes, finished with 23 to lead Georgetown.

Khyri Thomas, scoreless in the first half, blocked Peak's shot from under the basket and then hit a 3-pointer during a 19-6 run that gave Creighton a 60-44 lead. The spurt also featured two 3s by Foster and a couple of dunks by Patton, who was on the bench for the last 8 minutes of the first half with two fouls.

The Hoyas looked to be gaining momentum as they pulled within 66-55, but then they went scoreless for nearly 4 1/2 minutes.

Rodney Pryor added 16 points and Jessie Govan had 12 for the Hoyas.

Foster was 13 of 19 from the field and finished his big game with a 3-pointer in the final minute.

The Bluejays rode the shooting of Foster and Huff to a 41-33 halftime lead. Foster and Huff combined for 25 first-half points on 11-of-16 shooting. The Hoyas were 1 for 8 from 3-point range and committed 10 turnovers in the first half.

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Although the Caps lost, it's apparent that they're starting to find their game

Although the Caps lost, it's apparent that they're starting to find their game

NEW YORK—As disappointing as Sunday’s 2-1 loss at Madison Square Garden was for the Caps, Coach Barry Trotz and his players emerged from the visitors’ dressing room heartened by how the team played over the final two periods.

Indeed, there was a distinct difference between the first 20 minutes, during which the Caps were outscored 1-0 and outshot 19-10, and the final 40 minutes, which saw the visitors battle back and threaten to steal a point on the road from a good, well-rested rested opponent.

“We were atrocious in the first,” Trotz said. “We played poorly and [backup goalie Philipp Grubauer] was outstanding. It could have been 5-0 in the first, not 1-0. But we were able to get through that. In the second and third, we had the better chances and [carried] the majority of the play.”

Sunday marked the Caps’ second game back from their six-day bye week. On Saturday, they started slowly and lost to the Red Wings in a shootout. Including that defeat, teams are 3-12-4 in their first game after the mandatory hiatus.

“For us, it was hard to come back after [the] break, have one practice and [then] play,” said Alex Ovechkin, who scored Washington’s lone goal against the Rangers. Saturday’s game in Detroit started at 2 p.m. “and today we played at 12:30. It was kinda tough with no morning skates.”

RELATED: Prediction recap: Caps can't solve Henrik Lundqvist

Prior to the bye, the Caps had won six games in a row, rolling up five or more goals in all but one of those contests.

It’s too early to say definitely whether Ovechkin and Co. are back. They are, after all, 0-1-1 since returning. But they certainly looked a lot more like their previously dominant selves after doubling the Rangers up in shots, 22-11, over the second and third periods in an entertaining matinee on Broadway.

So what was the difference between the first period and the rest of the game? Trotz didn’t mince his words.    

“We were engaged in the second and third,” he said. “We were winning our battles. We were managing the puck much better. And we really didn’t give up much. Grubi really got all of his work for the most part in the first period and then after that he didn’t have much.”

From where he was standing, Grubauer said he could see the timing and cohesiveness slowly returning to his teammates’ collective game.

“The break was long,” Grubauer said. “Sometimes you have to find that chemistry.”

He added: “That’s not how we wanted to start, giving up those many scoring chances. But we did a pretty good job coming back [and] dominated the second and third periods.”

Defenseman Matt Niskanen agreed with Grubauer’s assessment.

“The second two periods were a lot better than the first [period], and a lot better than yesterday,” Niskanen said. “So it’s a step in the right direction.”

The Caps will take Monday off and then return to practice Tuesday morning in Arlington before heading to Philadelphia for a Wednesday night showdown with the Flyers.

“It was a lot better, that’s for sure,” Nicklas Backstrom said of the final 40 minutes at the Garden. “I thought the first period was not how we play. But we’ve lost two in a row. We’ve got to get back to the way we played before. We’ll have another practice before the next game, so we’ve just got to get back at it.”

MORE CAPITALS: Grubauer not enough as Caps drop goalie duel to Rangers