Miss out on MCM registration? You can still sign up...


Miss out on MCM registration? You can still sign up...

Want to run the 37th Marine Corps Marathon but unable to secure your bib in the ridiculously fast 2 hour and 41 minute sellout that occurred on registration day? Well you're in luck...

You still have two options to run in this year's race: sign up for the MCM Transfer Program or register as a MCM Charity Partner.

On Wednesday, June 20 unregistered runners will be able to sign up for the MCM Transfer Program, which will allow registered runners to transfer their 2012 MCM bibs to those on the list.

Registered participants will be able to transfer their entries to unregistered runners anytime between June 20 and August 31. After completing a transfer form, the registered participant will receive a unique code, link and password via email to send to the runner of their choice. Runners then registered through the MCM Transfer Program must pay a 30 transfer fee before September 7.

Want to connect with someone looking to transfer? Visit the MCM Facebook page or MCM Message Board.

Registered runners for the 2012 MCM will also be able to transfer from the full marathon to the MCM10K at no cost. Interested runners can do so now but must complete the process by September 7.

Want to run for a cause? Check out the MCM's Charity Partners and their MCM programs at www.marinemarathon.com. Many of them have entries available for those who want to help support their very worthy causes.

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Evaluating what Wizards need from reserves to succeed in 2016-17

Evaluating what Wizards need from reserves to succeed in 2016-17

The new season begins for the Wizards on Thursdsay at the Atlanta Hawks (CSN, 6:30 p.m.). While coach Scott Brooks hasn't made his starters official, the likely five are John Wall, Bradley Beal, Otto Porter, Markieff Morris and Marcin Gortat. 

But what about the rest? Without a balanced bench, it won't matter how good those starters are if the Wizards are going to turn last year's .500 record into their third playoff berth in four seasons. No official declaration has been made by Brooks about how he'll use his reserves, but based on recent comments and how he used players to end the preseason, these are the primary candidates (Note: Ian Mahinmi isn't listed because he's out with left knee surgery.)

PG Trey Burke: The assumption is that he’ll be Wall’s primary backup, and given his three years NBA experience, that seems to be the short-term plan. But Burke will be pushed. He averages 12.1 points which is good for a backup, but that’s hardly the only thing that matters. 1.) Ball pressure to set up the defense. Brooks is putting a lot of responsibility on all of his backcourt players to be more engaged. Burke didn't do that consistently in the preseason. Allowing the other team to walk the ball up and get into their offensive sets is a sure way to spend more time on the bench under Brooks. 2.) Running half-court offense more efficiently. In the preseason, Burke was indecisive with the ball and the Wizards were disjointed when the pace slowed. They couldn’t get into their offense and took low-percentage shots late in the shot clock.   

PG Tomas Satoransky: With four years under his belt as a pro in Europe, he’s not a typical rookie. At 6-7, he’s significantly bigger than Burke and has more of the edge that Brooks likes to see on defense. He has the chance to overtake Burke as the primary backup for Wall or give Brooks the option of a three-guard lineup. 1.) Develop a jumper. The Wizards realize he needs time but the easiest thing to improve is a stroke. If he puts in the work, it’ll come. Defenders will go under on pick-and-rolls when Satoransky has the ball and play the passing lanes. He can pick a team a part with his vision. 2.) Use length to slow down the ball. The downside of no Wall last season was Ramon Sessions was the fill-in, and he was a defensive liability. Satoransky has better size and there shouldn't be a major drop off whenever he comes in, especially against second-tier players for the opposing team.  

SG Marcus Thornton: His primary job will be shooting and scoring. Is he Beal's primary backup or will he be used in spot minutes when the Wizards require an offensive spark? Some nights, Thornton can score in bunches. 1.) An instant-offense option, Thornton is more of a scorer than a pure shooter. Some nights he has it and he can score in bunches. Other times he doesn’t. 2.) Efficient shooting. Thornton has been in the low 30s from three-point range since shooting about 42 percent from there during a 39-game stretch with the Celtics a few years ago. 3.) Movement. Thornton will have better results and higher-percentage shots if he doesn't stand and wait for the ball to shoot.

SF Kelly Oubre: He pushed Porter for the starting job but is still a year away from having a real shot at being a starter. The effort already is there. He just needs to polish. When he was drafted, the projection from president Ernie Grunfeld was two to three years. 1.) Control. Whenever Oubre gets into trouble, he’s too hyper. On offense, he will try to force the ball to the basket when the driving lane has been closed off and will result in a turnover or an awkward-looking blocked attempt. He has to realize there’s nothing wrong with being calm, kicking the ball back out and resetting. Defensively, he gambles a lot. There’s nothing wrong with containment. Every play doesn’t have to result in a steal. 2.) Diversify his game off the bounce. Oubre has to come up with counter moves to get to the rim. He can't go in straight lines, exclusively to his preferred left hand to dunk on everybody at will. 

PF/C Andrew Nicholson: At $26 million, he might prove to be a bargain acquisition considering the deals that were handed out this summer. Nicholson could end up like a lot of other players who step on the floor with Wall, who have their three-point accuracy skyrocket. He can play on the low block and doesn't shy from contact. 1.) Stretch four. He shot a career-high 36 percent from three-point range last season. His stroke looks better. When Nicholson was brought in, the question about whether he could be a legitimate three-point shooting, power forward was the first thing that came to mind. He only attempted 114 with the Magic. 2.) Spread five. The knee injury to Mahinmi means Brooks has to use Nicholson behind Gortat, too, and though he's just 6-foot-9, his 250-pound frame can handle it. When they go really small with Nicholson here, they can look like the Hawks did the last few years with Pero Antic and Al Horford spreading from the five spot. It can pose major matchup problems.

PF/C Jason Smith: Despite his jolly disposition, Smith can get nasty down low which is a quality the Wizards could use inside. How much he plays when Mahinmi comes back isn't clear. Though Smith isn't a three-point shooter, he has a solid face-up game that can draw his man from the rim. 1.) Focus on mid-range. Smith took his share of threes in the preseason, but that's still out of his comfort zone. He only attempted 16 threes in 76 appearances with the Magic. 2.) Hustle hard. The most surprising aspect of Smith's game is his ability to recover on defense and his help to close out runs at the rim. That kind of effort forces Brooks to find minutes for you.  

RELATED: Southeast Division Preview - Can the Wizards break the division title drought?

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Redskins injury report: Status on Norman, Reed unknown

Redskins injury report: Status on Norman, Reed unknown

At least 51 Redskins will be making the trip to London on Thursday night, including some who are pretty banged up. And there is hope that the other two will be able to make it across the pond.

“We're taking everybody, which is a good thing,” said coach Jay Gruden. “If something happens on Friday or Saturday, we can make adjustments if needed.”

He later clarified the statuses of tight end Jordan Reed and cornerback Josh Norman. Both of them are in the NFL’s concussion protocol, at least partially.

“I’m not too sure about this — Thursday they are going to the independent doctor and if they’re cleared they’ll go on the trip,” said Gruden. “If not, if we’re still having some pain and setbacks, at that point we’ll make that decision to probably leave them back.”

In other words, stay tuned on those two key players.

Two players were out of practice on Wednesday. Reserve linebacker Terrance Garvin was out with a hip injury, and starting running back Matt Jones missed with a knee problem.

The injury was as much a surprise to Gruden as it was to reporters when they saw that Jones was not participating in practice.

“He just came in, I guess, today, had some soreness laterally,” said Gruden. “Had some pain cutting, has to problem running straight ahead so we kept him out today.”

Limited in practice were wide receivers Jamison Crowder (groin) and DeSean Jackson (hamstring/shoulder); guard Brandon Scherff (shoulder), offensive tackle Trent Williams (knee), Reed, Norman, offensive lineman Spencer Long (chest), cornerback Bashaud Breeland (ankle) and tight end Vernon Davis (groin).

With six offensive starters limited and Jones out, Gruden had to alter practice somewhat.

“We had to do kind of a slower tempo on the offensive side of the ball because of the amount of injuries we had,” said Gruden.

MORE REDSKINS: Crowder explains dropped pass against Lions